Author Topic: Last Movie You Watched  (Read 1735822 times)

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Online drogulus

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26260 on: July 23, 2017, 06:45:28 AM »


If Nolan wanted to convey "the fog of war" those nebulous glimpses of German military power would fit in. 

     Now that I've seen the film I can say the WSJ review is worthless. She implies a familiarity with Stuka dive bombers yet fails to recognize the horrific screaming sound they made, one of the most impressive points of accuracy in the film. She didn't mention Spitfires and Me-109s dogfighting above the sea. She didn't mention them, or that the Spitfires were trying to get to the Heinkel bomber and the 109s were escorting the bomber to protect it from the Spitfires. Did she need a scene at RAF headquarters where an officer points to a map and explains the mission? Nolan made it clear what was happening and why to anyone, whatever level of historical or technical knowledge they might have.

     
« Last Edit: July 23, 2017, 06:51:37 AM by drogulus »
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Offline aligreto

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26261 on: July 23, 2017, 06:52:15 AM »
Beauty and the Beast....





The original animation version was a big favourite of my daughter when she was growing up. She constantly watched it. It was interesting to see this version a number of years later.
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Offline Bogey

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26262 on: July 23, 2017, 07:11:22 AM »
Well, and I cringe, I heard that they announced Tim Burton was to redo Dumbo.  Seeing I loved the original and that I do not care for his work, I just cannot see it.  Maybe he will surprise me, but until then I will continue to breathe normally.  As for Beauty and the Beast I thought the animated version and the Broadway play were both superior to this installment.
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Offline André

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26263 on: July 23, 2017, 09:02:06 AM »


Good subject. Will Smith "acts nigerian" a wee bit too much. Not entirely convincing.

And:

.

Excellent. First viewing, I had not managed to see it when it came out.

And, later this afternoon, with my son at the nearby plex Theatre:



Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26264 on: July 23, 2017, 10:32:19 AM »
Well, and I cringe, I heard that they announced Tim Burton was to redo Dumbo.

I was going to ask, Whatever for?  But I suppose the answer is, plain old lucre.
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Offline Cato

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26265 on: July 23, 2017, 11:01:58 AM »
Concerning Dunkirk...

     Now that I've seen the film I can say the WSJ review is worthless. She implies a familiarity with Stuka dive bombers yet fails to recognize the horrific screaming sound they made, one of the most impressive points of accuracy in the film. She didn't mention Spitfires and Me-109s dogfighting above the sea. She didn't mention them, or that the Spitfires were trying to get to the Heinkel bomber and the 109s were escorting the bomber to protect it from the Spitfires. Did she need a scene at RAF headquarters where an officer points to a map and explains the mission? Nolan made it clear what was happening and why to anyone, whatever level of historical or technical knowledge they might have.
   

Many thanks for the comments!  Mrs. Cato and I will probably see it this week, so I will be able to decide if the absence of specific historical figures makes a difference.




The music did not bother me (i.e., I did not feel otherwise than that it belonged) when I first watched the two movies, which would have been while I was at Wooster, the time of their initial release.  The source of my recent problem, as it were, is that I am finally watching the series itself, and the show’s atmosphere is very well enhanced by Alexander Courage’s score;  in contrast, Horner served up (understand that I am in something of the position of a hostile witness ;) ) what strikes me as boilerplate space-swashbuckling music.

The discussion is apt to veer towards ethics when the subject is Horner’s work
8)


I still recall being quite shocked - so much so that it took me away from the story on the screen - when I heard Horner recycling music from Braveheart for a movie called For Greater Glory (with Andy Garcia ) about anti-Catholicism in Mexico and a revolt against the government there in the 1920's. 

Given that the Braveheart score is excellent, and fairly well-known, it was just jarring to hear parts of it appear more than once!  Did the producers not pay Horner enough, so he cut some corners and just plugged in his music for  Mel Gibson's epic?

Concerning remaking Dumbo, undoubtedly not as a cartoon, all I can say is: Hollywood right now loves old ideas!  Anything original...try crowd-funding!
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Offline Ken B

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26266 on: July 23, 2017, 01:05:18 PM »
I was going to ask, Whatever for?  But I suppose the answer is, plain old lucre.

*cough* To Be or Not To Be *cough*
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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26267 on: July 23, 2017, 01:08:07 PM »

Offline André

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26268 on: July 23, 2017, 04:54:48 PM »
In Dunkirk, the music is by Hans Zimmer, with a good helping of Elgar (Nimrod) in the closing scenes.

I enjoyed the movie. Great direction and photo. As usual with movies based on history there are shortcuts and some glaring omissions. But that's ok. It's a POV, not a documentary. Unusually in a WWII movie, there is not a single american character to be seen (or heard).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26269 on: July 24, 2017, 12:44:30 AM »
I partly dislike that 1946 version of Great Expectations. The actor of Jaggers, my favorite character in the book, was not good.
Oh, I really like that version of Jaggers - always washing his hands. Arguably the best film adaption of a Dickens book. The opening scenes on the marshes are especially impressive I think.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26270 on: July 24, 2017, 01:01:23 AM »
I hope to see Dunkirk soon. Most of the reviews here in the UK are very positive but I've read a couple of very negative ones. There have been criticisms from France as the heroic French defence at Lille which helped allow the BEF to escape is hardly mentioned, if at all. Max Hastings the historian said that the French should make their own film about it. Most films about WW2 come from the USA. Usually they depict the USA winning the war on their own with the British getting in the way ( 8)). Even 'The a Great Escape' which, in reality featured no U.S. Escapees has Steve McQueen in his 1960 sweatshirt and motorbike. However, he is one of the best things in the film and it would not be nearly so enjoyable without him. Much of the financing of war films comes from the USA so it is totally understandable that their participation is highlighted for American audiences. Some annoyance here was caused by the movie about the capturing of the Enigma Code machine which showed it as a totally American operation whereas in fact it was a totally British operation. Therefore some of the critics here have said, of Dunkirk, that it's good to have an epic type war film which focuses almost exclusively on the British. Let me conclude by saying that I generally love American war movies - Saving Private Ryan, for example, (which ignores any British or Canadian contribution to D-Day) with its bleached out American flag blowing in the wind, maybe implying that the democratic and liberal values which we share are just about surviving and worth fighting for.

 Also, the real hero of Dunkirk was Admiral Ramsay at Dover Castle who organised the whole evacuation and is, as far as I'm aware, not mentioned in the film. Also most of the troops were taken home in the Royal Navy ships - the film, understandably, has been accused of over-emphasising the role of the small boats. They were, however, essential for getting the troops off the beaches and out to the destroyers etc.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2017, 01:12:20 AM by vandermolen »
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Offline James

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26271 on: July 24, 2017, 01:18:45 AM »
Dawn of the Dead
1978 ‧ Thriller/Action ‧ 2h 7m

As hordes of zombies swarm over the U.S., the terrified populace tries everything in their power to escape the attack of the undead, but neither cities nor the countryside prove safe. In Pennsylvania, radio-station employee Stephen (David Emge) and his girlfriend, Francine (Gaylen Ross), escape in the station helicopter, accompanied by two renegade SWAT members, Roger and Pete. The group retreats to the haven of an enclosed shopping center to make what could be humanity's last stand.


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Offline Cato

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26272 on: July 24, 2017, 03:04:37 AM »
I hope to see Dunkirk soon. Most of the reviews here in the UK are very positive but I've read a couple of very negative ones. There have been criticisms from France as the heroic French defence at Lille which helped allow the BEF to escape is hardly mentioned, if at all. Max Hastings the historian said that the French should make their own film about it. Most films about WW2 come from the USA. Usually they depict the USA winning the war on their own with the British getting in the way ( 8)). Even 'The a Great Escape' which, in reality featured no U.S. Escapees has Steve McQueen in his 1960 sweatshirt and motorbike. However, he is one of the best things in the film and it would not be nearly so enjoyable without him. Much of the financing of war films comes from the USA so it is totally understandable that their participation is highlighted for American audiences. Some annoyance here was caused by the movie about the capturing of the Enigma Code machine which showed it as a totally American operation whereas in fact it was a totally British operation. Therefore some of the critics here have said, of Dunkirk, that it's good to have an epic type war film which focuses almost exclusively on the British. Let me conclude by saying that I generally love American war movies - Saving Private Ryan, for example, (which ignores any British or Canadian contribution to D-Day) with its bleached out American flag blowing in the wind, maybe implying that the democratic and liberal values which we share are just about surviving and worth fighting for.


 Also, the real hero of Dunkirk was Admiral Ramsay at Dover Castle who organised the whole evacuation and is, as far as I'm aware, not mentioned in the film.
Also most of the troops were taken home in the Royal Navy ships - the film, understandably, has been accused of over-emphasising the role of the small boats. They were, however, essential for getting the troops off the beaches and out to the destroyers etc.

Many thanks for the comments!  Do you know the 1960's epic The Longest Day, about the D-Day invasion?  It does show the British, the French, and the German aspects of D-Day.

Agreed that very few war movies are meant to be documentaries, and so facts are ignored are or completely changed for whatever purpose, dramatic or otherwise, e.g. Steve McQueen doing his own stunts on the cross-country motorcycle.  Sure, why not?!  8)
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26273 on: July 24, 2017, 03:23:35 AM »
Many thanks for the comments!  Do you know the 1960's epic The Longest Day, about the D-Day invasion?  It does show the British, the French, and the German aspects of D-Day.

Agreed that very few war movies are meant to be documentaries, and so facts are ignored are or completely changed for whatever purpose, dramatic or otherwise, e.g. Steve McQueen doing his own stunts on the cross-country motorcycle.  Sure, why not?!  8)
Always a pleasure Leo.  :)

Yes, I think my parents probably took me to see 'The Longest Day' at the cinema and I have the DVD here. Amongst much else it features a pre-Bond Sean Connery on the beach. It is, indeed, a very fine film, showing events from a number of different perspectives and has an air of authenticity about it. Likewise 'Tora,Tora,Tora' which shows Pearl Harbor from a Japanese and American perspective. It is an intelligent film unlike IMHO the daft 'Pear Harbor'. Having said all this I also like pure escapism like 'Where Eagle's Dare'.

One problem with movies which purport to show real events is that they can give a very distorted view which leads to a kind of 'factualisation of history'. Still, I learnt my lesson when, teaching a class about D-Day, - a visiting Canadian student of about 15 took me to task for not mentioning the important Canadian contribution. After that I always mentioned it. :)
« Last Edit: July 24, 2017, 03:31:54 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26274 on: July 24, 2017, 03:41:46 AM »
Beauty and the Beast....





The original animation version was a big favourite of my daughter when she was growing up. She constantly watched it. It was interesting to see this version a number of years later.
Exactly the same situation here.  :)
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Offline Alberich

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26275 on: July 24, 2017, 04:21:07 AM »
Oh, I really like that version of Jaggers - always washing his hands. Arguably the best film adaption of a Dickens book. The opening scenes on the marshes are especially impressive I think.

I think the reason I kind of dislike the actor is because to my mind he doesn't look anything like Jaggers I imagine him to look like when I read the book. I forget how he is described in the book, so the actor could be faithful to it for all I know - but I often make my own visual images about characters in my head even if they don't resemble the image they are actually given in the book itself.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26276 on: July 24, 2017, 04:45:16 AM »
I think the reason I kind of dislike the actor is because to my mind he doesn't look anything like Jaggers I imagine him to look like when I read the book. I forget how he is described in the book, so the actor could be faithful to it for all I know - but I often make my own visual images about characters in my head even if they don't resemble the image they are actually given in the book itself.
An interesting point. He was rather 'over the top' but I rather liked his performance and the way in which he reasons with Pip about his decision to save the young Estella.
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Offline Ken B

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26277 on: July 24, 2017, 05:08:52 AM »
Always a pleasure Leo.  :)

Yes, I think my parents probably took me to see 'The Longest Day' at the cinema and I have the DVD here. Amongst much else it features a pre-Bond Sean Connery on the beach. It is, indeed, a very fine film, showing events from a number of different perspectives and has an air of authenticity about it. Likewise 'Tora,Tora,Tora' which shows Pearl Harbor from a Japanese and American perspective. It is an intelligent film unlike IMHO the daft 'Pear Harbor'. Having said all this I also like pure escapism like 'Where Eagle's Dare'.

One problem with movies which purport to show real events is that they can give a very distorted view which leads to a kind of 'factualisation of history'. Still, I learnt my lesson when, teaching a class about D-Day, - a visiting Canadian student of about 15 took me to task for not mentioning the important Canadian contribution. After that I always mentioned it. :)

Great post.

Just be thankful you didn't teach WWI and not mention Vimy Ridge. He'd still be talking.  ;)

For those not in the know, there were 5 beaches assaulted on D-Day. Two were bloodbaths, Omaha and Juno. Juno was the Canadian Beach. Canada had a bit less than 10% of the US population. But Vimy Ridge is the battle in Canadian history.

Those looking for really grim can google Newfoundland Somme. It was not part of Canada at that time.
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Offline Todd

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26278 on: July 24, 2017, 05:17:30 AM »



Dunkirk.  It didn't end up being as good as the critical praise more than hinted at.  The focus on the experience of the soldiers was well done, and the beach scenes were well done, but some things didn't work for me.  The alternating timelines became tiresome and detracted from the narrative.  A couple sub-plots, if that's what they were, really didn't add anything.  And Hans Zimmer's score became oppressive at times, with the ticking device not all that effective.  Tom Hardy appears to have had a good gig here, as he probably could have shot all his scenes in one or two days in a soundstage, except for his last scene.  All that written, Nolan dives right into the action and keeps tension high throughout, which is helped by not showing the enemy even once.  The film is not really an acting showcase, except for the plotline with Mark Rylance and Cillian Murphy, and there it's mostly Rylance who delivers.  Very good overall, but not Nolan's best, and not necessarily a great war film, either.  I'll watch again on the small screen to see if there are details missed on the big screen.
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Offline Bogey

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #26279 on: July 24, 2017, 05:54:13 AM »
Love the movie! I fear we are at odds viz. the score  8)


To try to explain a bit better:

The music did not bother me (i.e., I did not feel otherwise than that it belonged) when I first watched the two movies, which would have been while I was at Wooster, the time of their initial release.  The source of my recent problem, as it were, is that I am finally watching the series itself, and the show’s atmosphere is very well enhanced by Alexander Courage’s score;  in contrast, Horner served up (understand that I am in something of the position of a hostile witness ;) ) what strikes me as boilerplate space-swashbuckling music.

The discussion is apt to veer towards ethics when the subject is Horner’s work  8) but neither are we in the position to disentangle the composer’s role and choices, from the demands of the production (“Give us something just like Star Wars...”)  There is a well-loved tune in Star Wars (itself related interestingly to a Leitmotiv from The Ring) which Horner manages to echo in The Wrath of Khan, and, why yes, he brings it back at a key dramatic moment in The Search for Spock.

Mind you, while the springboard here has been my expression a degree of disappointment at the artistic effect of the character of Horner’s score, I am not (presently ;) ) concerned with the ethics angle.  The broader question of reference/appropriation has been uppermost in my mind as I continue (at last) work on White Nights—though to be sure, all the material is my own—as I find use in these later scenes for material already exposed.

Was not ignoring this post, my friend.  I threw the score in my car and am listening to it in parts during travels at less than warp speed.  So far, the score, standing alone, holds up nicely for me.  There is a nod, IMO, to Goldsmith's score for Star Trek: The Motion-less Picture which is a decent bridge without just lifting his main theme.  However, I enjoy Horner's main theme here.  It's Star Treky enough (which I want), but original enough.  The attack music is over the top and the theme is more reserved.  If I rated them though, it would not be at the top.  Here would be my faves:

Any Courage renditions (this clip even has the animated series theme which is not Courage). This theme has to now be part of my DNA.  Probably the first music I remember ever humming as a kid. 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9IyJ3uoDMsg

And the pilot,though the fading bugs me
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eH7cjAYPOk

Goldsmith's: Glad to hear the TNG opening lifting it

Giacchino: Love his theme and how he channels the original Courage theme

then would come Horner's Wrath work....though I recall enjoying the Deep Space 9 music quite a bit. 

And in disclosure of my geekness, I do own and enjoy this beauty:

There will never be another era like the Golden Age of Hollywood.  We didn't know how to blow up buildings then so we had no choice but to tell great stories with great characters.-Ben Mankiewicz