Author Topic: Last Movie You Watched  (Read 1906269 times)

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Offline NikF

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27260 on: February 10, 2018, 03:53:12 PM »
Agnès Varda is a rare phenomenon in the world of cinema. She directed her first feature film La Pointe courte in 1955 and immediately drew the attention of critics. 63 years later she is still going strong, her latest film Visage, villages is nominated for an oscar at the 2018 Academy Awards (best documentary) as well as at the french César awards (the french oscars). A living legend,  she will be 90 in a few months. Fiercely independent, most of her (all too rare) films are documentaries. Cléo is probably her lasting contribution to the Nouvelle vague, a film in which the city (Paris) is a character, a foil for Cléo’s moods and thoughts.

What a charming coffee table book level of summary. Bravo/Brava!
"You overestimate my power of attraction," he told her. "No, I don't," she replied sharply, "and neither do you".

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27261 on: February 10, 2018, 05:47:17 PM »
It feels a bit odd, as revelations go ... but I've just watched Fistful of Dollars (in toto) for the first time. I mean, I'd already seen Yojimbo and Last Man Standing.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27262 on: February 10, 2018, 08:24:49 PM »
“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

Undersea

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27263 on: February 10, 2018, 08:55:32 PM »
.



Finally got around to watching this - As is usual with sequels of this sort I was'nt expecting much.
Personally I thought the movie was wonderful and it managed to keep my interest despite the slow pace and long running time.
Quite a worthy follow-up to the original Blade Runner movie IMO.
I'll probably end up buying this one for my movie collection at some stage.

Offline Draško

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27264 on: February 11, 2018, 07:12:41 AM »
Agnès Varda is a rare phenomenon in the world of cinema. She directed her first feature film La Pointe courte in 1955 and immediately drew the attention of critics. 63 years later she is still going strong, her latest film Visage, villages is nominated for an oscar at the 2018 Academy Awards (best documentary) as well as at the french César awards (the french oscars). A living legend,  she will be 90 in a few months. Fiercely independent, most of her (all too rare) films are documentaries. Cléo is probably her lasting contribution to the Nouvelle vague, a film in which the city (Paris) is a character, a foil for Cléo’s moods and thoughts.

Wonderful sum-up indeed!  8)



The Chinese Jade (1963)
Sword of Adventure (1964)
Full Circle Killing (1964)
Sword of Seduction (1964)


Over last couple of weeks the first four films in a classic chanbara series (of twelve in total). Nemuri Kyoshiro is my favorite chanbara lead, the most anti-heroic and cynical and yet with his own codes of honor and right/wrong, sweet on the ladies. Well played by Raizo Ichikawa. 

Offline milk

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27265 on: February 11, 2018, 08:20:25 PM »
This was even better than I'd remembered. It's a film everyone can and should see: beautiful, heartbreaking - but also a very insightful portrayal of childhood. All this against the experience of history. Malle's masterpiece is a quiet expression of what it was to choose right over wrong and what was at stake in those times. It's all in the subtleties of his understated mise en scene which also shows what the French cinema was and why it was so important. 

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27266 on: February 12, 2018, 10:37:24 AM »
It's easy to go back and forth. I guess it's part of the fun of rewatching films. I totally see your point about the moral decay theme generally. I have a special fondness for Broadway Danny Rose and that was confirmed by a recent rewatch. Why I like that one: it's a farce (and I like tightly plotted farces), It takes classic New York comedy and vaudeville and show business as its them (great themes), it's got great gags and jokes ("he was a juice man for mob" "he made juice for the mob?"), it's got funny songs, and it's got a very idiosyncratic cast of characters. I think I like Annie Hal because it really gives one the sense of experiencing a relationship from all views in time. It's poignant in that way. But Manhattan may be Allen's most beautiful looking film (Gordon Willis?). 

I did revisit Broadway Danny Rose.  As with Annie Hall, I failed earlier to be sensitive to its particular character.

I suppose I owe this to others. . .

!! SPOILER ALERT !!

What really hit me this time is how (atypically, we might say, for the characters he executes in his own screenplays) how generally and unequivocally liked, and how vulnerable, Danny is (although it turned out that he threw Barney Dunn under the bus, to the best of his knowledge Barney was to be out of harm’s way at the time – and Danny did what he could as amends).  And especially, how the entire adventure with Tina, which was all for Lou, served to reinvigorate Lou for a performance which sold him to a new manager . . . so that Danny put himself through the wringer, absolutely the wringer, only to get kicked in the gut when all seemed to have been resolved splendidly.  I do not remember any instance of feeling so viscerally in sympathy for Woody Allen’s character (in what movie soever), as when he tells Tina that he’s had a bad year.

So, I owe you big thanks for pointing me back to this ’un.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline aligreto

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27267 on: February 12, 2018, 11:11:00 AM »
Inside Man....





I quite liked this one.
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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27268 on: February 12, 2018, 11:17:25 AM »
Another film I revisited was Being John Malkovich; and in fairness I need to do this again:

!! SPOILER ALERT !!

The first time I saw it (first and second times?) the brilliance of the conceit and execution blew me away.  I was conscious both of enjoying the movie, and of feeling a slight unease.  Partly, I suppose, because Craig is at once an impressively talented, dedicated artist, and yet, a cad, and indeed much worse than a cad.  Lottie locked in a cage, and with duct tape over her mouth, is one of the most horrid things I’ve seen in a comedy.  But this was only what I was aware of as a disturbing element, and just part of the story – not the real cause of the unease.

I think I may now have put my finger on it:  inexhaustible pity for Malkovich.  What starts out innocuously enough as “Did you just call me ‘Lottie’?” becomes by stages (if we unpack the existential can of worms) something completely terrifying.  It’s bad enough that he finds strangers queuing up to look out of his eyes for 15 minutes at a go, after finding that he has spoken words and made gestures that were not his own will.  But then Craig takes over completely, not merely physical control of his body (yes, a mind-bending application of the art of puppetry), but uproots his career as an actor.  Craig realizes his dream of becoming a celebrated puppeteer, but only by assuming hostile possession of Malkovich.  Where is Malkovich’s soul through all this?  In some darkness, too weak, too unskilled to contest with Craig for mastery of his physical self.

But the real horror is at midnight on his 44th birthday.  Craig yields to the blackmail, and surrenders Malkovich to Dr Lester & al.  For a second, only, Malkovich sees his face in the mirror and is himself – until the parade of oldsters, who are determined to live forever, begin piling in.  And never will Malkovich be seen more.  What a hell!

Of course, I don’t want to focus on that question.   A somewhat higher circle of hell (and at least in this case, arguably deserved) is Craig who appears at the end to be inhabiting young Emily.  Or, well, trapped in Emily.  It must not have been what he hoped for.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline mc ukrneal

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27269 on: February 12, 2018, 11:25:35 AM »
.



Finally got around to watching this - As is usual with sequels of this sort I was'nt expecting much.
Personally I thought the movie was wonderful and it managed to keep my interest despite the slow pace and long running time.
Quite a worthy follow-up to the original Blade Runner movie IMO.
I'll probably end up buying this one for my movie collection at some stage.
I saw this recently too. And I too was expecting little, but I agree with your assessment. I found the time flew by. Anyone expecting an action movie might be disappointed. There is action, but that is not really the main part of the film.
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Offline milk

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27270 on: February 12, 2018, 10:08:23 PM »
I did revisit Broadway Danny Rose.  As with Annie Hall, I failed earlier to be sensitive to its particular character.

I suppose I owe this to others. . .

!! SPOILER ALERT !!

What really hit me this time is how (atypically, we might say, for the characters he executes in his own screenplays) how generally and unequivocally liked, and how vulnerable, Danny is (although it turned out that he threw Barney Dunn under the bus, to the best of his knowledge Barney was to be out of harm’s way at the time – and Danny did what he could as amends).  And especially, how the entire adventure with Tina, which was all for Lou, served to reinvigorate Lou for a performance which sold him to a new manager . . . so that Danny put himself through the wringer, absolutely the wringer, only to get kicked in the gut when all seemed to have been resolved splendidly.  I do not remember any instance of feeling so viscerally in sympathy for Woody Allen’s character (in what movie soever), as when he tells Tina that he’s had a bad year.

So, I owe you big thanks for pointing me back to this ’un.
Oh great! Yes I think this is Allen's most unique and maybe strongest acting turn. Fans of Allen probably don't notice his skills as an actor very much. Here, he's successful in a subtly different way than in other efforts. Quite right about the vulnerability he so rarely finds in his offings. It's Mia Farrow at her best too, but I sense that's in the writing as much as the performance. But not to diminish her because she really is good here. But, Nick Apollo Forte really nearly steals the show. He's never less than believable and I really get a kick out of his schtick.   

Offline aligreto

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27271 on: February 13, 2018, 01:46:33 PM »
Volcano....





I have always liked Tommy Lee Jones.
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Offline Draško

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27272 on: February 13, 2018, 02:56:20 PM »
Finally got around to watching this - As is usual with sequels of this sort I was'nt expecting much.
Personally I thought the movie was wonderful and it managed to keep my interest despite the slow pace and long running time.

I saw this recently too. And I too was expecting little, but I agree with your assessment. I found the time flew by.

+1



Sunstroke, Nikita Mikhalkov's latest.

Offline Ken B

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27273 on: February 13, 2018, 03:58:26 PM »
Judgment at Nuremberg (1961)

This holds up pretty well. It has the same sort of headshake errors most courtroom movies do, and more than just a few Stanley Kramer moments, but it's interesting and well acted throughout. Widmark is the standout, playing against type.
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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27274 on: February 14, 2018, 03:52:28 AM »
Judgment at Nuremberg (1961)

This holds up pretty well. It has the same sort of headshake errors most courtroom movies do, and more than just a few Stanley Kramer moments, but it's interesting and well acted throughout. Widmark is the standout, playing against type.


I do need to watch that one at last.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline milk

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27275 on: February 15, 2018, 06:03:36 PM »
Agnès Varda is a rare phenomenon in the world of cinema. She directed her first feature film La Pointe courte in 1955 and immediately drew the attention of critics. 63 years later she is still going strong, her latest film Visage, villages is nominated for an oscar at the 2018 Academy Awards (best documentary) as well as at the french César awards (the french oscars). A living legend,  she will be 90 in a few months. Fiercely independent, most of her (all too rare) films are documentaries. Cléo is probably her lasting contribution to the Nouvelle vague, a film in which the city (Paris) is a character, a foil for Cléo’s moods and thoughts.
I saw Vagabond in a class when I was a student. It made a lasting impression on me. I remember it as powerful and masterful.

Offline aligreto

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27276 on: February 16, 2018, 02:56:59 PM »
The Gunman....





I an not a big fan of Sean Penn.
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Offline aleazk

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27277 on: February 16, 2018, 03:39:42 PM »
I saw Call me by your name.

There's not a single thing in this movie that I found less than beautiful. Quite moving. Also, excellent soundtrack, with pieces by Ravel and John Adams.

Offline milk

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27278 on: February 16, 2018, 04:52:46 PM »

L'Argent de poche by François Truffaut. A small masterpiece. I didn't connect with much of his work after 400 blows. But this is back to Bazinian realism. I think it must be difficult to work with kids. I knew my wife would enjoy this one! 

Offline George

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Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Reply #27279 on: February 16, 2018, 04:55:49 PM »

Three Billboards Outside....... (2017) w/ Frances McDormand, Woody Harrelson, Sam Rockwell, & Peter Dinklage - short synopsis below (2nd quote); ratings, 8.5/10, IMDB; 93% (8.6/10), Rotten Tomatoes critics (4.3/5 from audience) - just an excellent film and highly recommended - I'd agree w/ the ratings - already stacking up nominations - 6 Golden Globe, 4 Screen Actor's Guild, and likely foretells a number of Oscar nominations to follow - McDormand in both lists for 'Best Actress.'  Dave :)

Saw this one today and found it funny, moving and unpredictable. Sam Rockwell and Woody Harrelson are two of my favorite actors, so it was a treat to see both of them here.
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