Author Topic: Tchaikovsky  (Read 63503 times)

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Offline zamyrabyrd

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #380 on: August 27, 2018, 11:09:46 PM »
Valery Gergiev recorded all of the Tchaikovsky Symphonies with the Mariinsky Orchestra, including some shorter works as the Polonaise from Eugene Onegin. Not only the aural quality but the visuals are impressive.
The whole series was on TV some years ago. Luckily there was still an VHS recorder on standby.

https://www.amazon.com/Tchaikovsky-Symphonies-Nos-4-5-6/dp/B005HK8L18
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Offline kyjo

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #381 on: February 21, 2019, 10:11:38 PM »
Just discovered Tchaikovsky’s infrequently-heard “symphonic ballad” The Voyevoda and was quite stunned! A late work, it is possibly the most “modern” in feel of any Tchaikovsky work that I know. It’s orchestration is highly successful and colorful (something that can’t be said for some other works of his IMO), with creative use of percussion, celeste, and harp. It’s even rather proto-Sibelian (!) with its tensely charged opening timpani figure and its overall sense of inevitability. It ends with bone-crushing low brass straight out of the Pathetique and Manfred symphonies. Powerful and really surprising stuff!
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Offline ChamberNut

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #382 on: February 22, 2019, 04:57:02 AM »
Just discovered Tchaikovsky’s infrequently-heard “symphonic ballad” The Voyevoda and was quite stunned! A late work, it is possibly the most “modern” in feel of any Tchaikovsky work that I know. It’s orchestration is highly successful and colorful (something that can’t be said for some other works of his IMO), with creative use of percussion, celeste, and harp. It’s even rather proto-Sibelian (!) with its tensely charged opening timpani figure and its overall sense of inevitability. It ends with bone-crushing low brass straight out of the Pathetique and Manfred symphonies. Powerful and really surprising stuff!

Glad you enjoyed it.  It is a great piece!
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Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #383 on: February 22, 2019, 06:35:54 AM »
Glad you enjoyed it.  It is a great piece!

+1!

Offline Ghost of Baron Scarpia

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #384 on: February 22, 2019, 10:14:10 AM »
'It...preserves a volatile performance of the Tchaikovsky 5th unlike any of Stokowski's three commercial recordings. Here, in front of an enthusiastic Detroit audience, he is swept up in the passion of the moment to a considerable degree.'

I don't doubt the intensity of the performance, but I find it implausible that the performance was the way it was because the conductor was "swept up in the passion of the moment." The conductors influence on a performance is formed during rehearsal, not because of how he waves the baton during the performance. (And it now occurs to me that Stowkowski conducted without a baton.) Expressive effects executed by an ensemble of 100 musicians are calculated, not spontaneous.

I'll admit I tend to interpret displays of 'emotion' by conductors on the podium as phony and manipulative. I saw Bernstein conduct the NY Philharmonic once and all of his jumping up and down on the podium struck me as ridiculous.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2019, 10:27:42 AM by Ghost of Baron Scarpia »
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Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #385 on: February 22, 2019, 10:32:24 AM »
Just discovered Tchaikovsky’s infrequently-heard “symphonic ballad” The Voyevoda and was quite stunned! A late work, it is possibly the most “modern” in feel of any Tchaikovsky work that I know. It’s orchestration is highly successful and colorful (something that can’t be said for some other works of his IMO), with creative use of percussion, celeste, and harp. It’s even rather proto-Sibelian (!) with its tensely charged opening timpani figure and its overall sense of inevitability. It ends with bone-crushing low brass straight out of the Pathetique and Manfred symphonies. Powerful and really surprising stuff!
Glad you enjoyed it.  It is a great piece!

Indeed it is! I was surprised and delighted when I first heard it too. I have Inbal and Petrenko in it now, I'd take either of them.  :)

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Offline PerfectWagnerite

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #386 on: May 07, 2019, 04:21:03 PM »
Just want to say: Happy birthday Peter !

Offline Todd

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #387 on: May 19, 2019, 06:26:37 AM »



Starting in on Valentina Lisitsa's survey of the complete Tchaikovsky solo piano works.  Plus some four hands works she plays with her husband.  Everything was recorded in short order in December 2017 and January 2018 in a Bösendorfer studio using a Bösendorfer piano.  I'm not sure that the piano is the best choice for Tchaikovsky, but I'm guessing it's a sponsorship thing.  Anyhoo, almost all of my Tchaikovsky piano related music is limited to the First Piano Concerto, so most of the music is new to me.

The first disc contains early works.  Tchaikovsky wrote often and early for piano as eight of his first ten opus numbers are devoted to works for the instrument.  The works are mostly collections of miniatures, with the thirteen minute plus Op 4 Valse-caprice the big work here.  Everything sounds of its time and perhaps place.  It's romantic music, but not too taxing for the most part.  There are audible clues to it being from Tchaikovsky, and everything sounds more or less attractive, if not always entirely memorable.  A few pieces, though brief or brief-ish, do seem a bit too long, but that's OK.

Lisitsa plays quite well, and while her instrument sounds very much like a Bösendorfer, with some sharper than Steinway upper registers, through careful pedaling and finger legato, she coaxes some lovely sounds from her instrument.  With some bigger, better known pieces coming, I'm thinking it may not hurt to maybe snap up at least one or two other discs for comparison, just so I don't think Lisitsa offers the last word in Tchaikovsky piano playing.
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Offline Florestan

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #388 on: May 19, 2019, 06:47:22 AM »



Starting in on Valentina Lisitsa's survey of the complete Tchaikovsky solo piano works.  Plus some four hands works she plays with her husband.  Everything was recorded in short order in December 2017 and January 2018 in a Bösendorfer studio using a Bösendorfer piano.  I'm not sure that the piano is the best choice for Tchaikovsky, but I'm guessing it's a sponsorship thing.  Anyhoo, almost all of my Tchaikovsky piano related music is limited to the First Piano Concerto, so most of the music is new to me.

The first disc contains early works.  Tchaikovsky wrote often and early for piano as eight of his first ten opus numbers are devoted to works for the instrument.  The works are mostly collections of miniatures, with the thirteen minute plus Op 4 Valse-caprice the big work here.  Everything sounds of its time and perhaps place.  It's romantic music, but not too taxing for the most part.  There are audible clues to it being from Tchaikovsky, and everything sounds more or less attractive, if not always entirely memorable.  A few pieces, though brief or brief-ish, do seem a bit too long, but that's OK.

Lisitsa plays quite well, and while her instrument sounds very much like a Bösendorfer, with some sharper than Steinway upper registers, through careful pedaling and finger legato, she coaxes some lovely sounds from her instrument.  With some bigger, better known pieces coming, I'm thinking it may not hurt to maybe snap up at least one or two other discs for comparison, just so I don't think Lisitsa offers the last word in Tchaikovsky piano playing.

Great review, thanks!

The only competition she has for a complete cycle is Viktoria Postnikova which I have and am very pleased with. Being a Tchaikovsky afficionado, I got Lisitsa's set as well --- but I'll be damned if I'm ever going to do any A/B comparison. I'll just spin whatever disc I fancy and simply wallow in the music.

As individual discs I have Lugansky, Pletnev, Dang Thai Son and Jonas Vitaud. Like them all.
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Offline Jo498

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #389 on: May 19, 2019, 07:44:20 AM »
Of the big names, Pletnev has probably recorded more solo Tchaikovsky than most, although some is introuvable on old Melodiya issues.
There is also at least one Richter recital on Regis/Olympia/whatever and a mono recording of the big G major sonata by him.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
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Offline Florestan

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #390 on: May 19, 2019, 07:47:38 AM »
Of the big names, Pletnev has probably recorded more solo Tchaikovsky than most, although some is introuvable on old Melodiya issues.

This is what I have:



If anyone is interested in hearing it, just PM me.
"Beauty must appeal to the senses, must provide us with immediate enjoyment, must impress us or insinuate itself into us without any effort on our part." - Claude Debussy

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #391 on: May 19, 2019, 07:55:29 AM »
Great review, thanks!

The only competition she has for a complete cycle is Viktoria Postnikova

not completely true - there's an old Vox/turnabout set from Michael Ponti remastered on Membran.



as ever "complete" can be a movable feast and I have not compared the new set to Ponti's to set if anything is missing.  Also - as ever - with Ponti - you get bravura piano playing that can occasionally loose detail in the sheer spectacle of his virtuosic style.  But I must admit to rather enjoying his approach.  Some find this remastered sound OK, others are less generous......... but its excellent value

Offline Florestan

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #392 on: May 19, 2019, 08:00:13 AM »
not completely true - there's an old Vox/turnabout set from Michael Ponti remastered on Membran.



as ever "complete" can be a movable feast and I have not compared the new set to Ponti's to set if anything is missing.  Also - as ever - with Ponti - you get bravura piano playing that can occasionally loose detail in the sheer spectacle of his virtuosic style.  But I must admit to rather enjoying his approach.  Some find this remastered sound OK, others are less generous......... but its excellent value

Drat! That is the last thing I needed, but --- on to the wishlist it goes. :)



"Beauty must appeal to the senses, must provide us with immediate enjoyment, must impress us or insinuate itself into us without any effort on our part." - Claude Debussy

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #393 on: May 21, 2019, 12:45:37 PM »
Drat! That is the last thing I needed, but --- on to the wishlist it goes. :)

Sorry!  Ponti also  recorded the concerti on Vox with the Prague SO - again not my top choice but I do like his impulsive and individual approach.....



certainly worth a £1.60 punt + postage!

Offline JBS

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #394 on: May 21, 2019, 04:12:48 PM »
Drat! That is the last thing I needed, but --- on to the wishlist it goes. :)

As long as you are wishlisting that, put his Scriabin on there too. It's on Vox, in two parts (2CDs for the Sonatas, 5 CDs for everything else), and his style works very well there. Have not heard his PIT.

ETA Amazon indicates the  Vox issue of Ponti's Tchaikovsky is available in  a similar multi installment fashion if you want to avoid Membran.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2019, 04:16:58 PM by JBS »

Offline Daverz

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #395 on: May 21, 2019, 09:13:26 PM »
This is what I have:



If anyone is interested in hearing it, just PM me.

It's been reissued on the Alto label.  It's also on the streaming services.



Offline Jo498

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #396 on: May 21, 2019, 11:33:40 PM »
There is another Pletnev disc with older material on alto/Regis (and they were both on BMG long ago), one newer one on DG and fillers for Mussorgsky on Virgin.

Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)