Author Topic: Good Resources for Beginners  (Read 35455 times)

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MN Dave

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Re: Good Resources for Beginners
« Reply #40 on: November 26, 2009, 06:29:55 AM »
I think they were switching database systems or something...

Brahmsian

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Re: Good Resources for Beginners
« Reply #41 on: November 26, 2009, 06:31:51 AM »
Thank goodness.  Maybe it was your email, BrahmsNut.  Big thanks for that in any case.   8)

Thanks, but as MN Dave said, they were in the middle of switching or upgrading their database and site.

Regardless, I'm just happy it's back.

Offline MishaK

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Re: Good Resources for Beginners
« Reply #42 on: January 18, 2011, 12:21:47 PM »
Haven't seen this mentioned here... The Chicago Symphony Orchestra's highly acclaimed "Beyond the Score" programs have been franchised out to other orchestras in the US. These programs consist of a multimedia presentation with actors and narrators and video alongside live musical excerpts played live by the orchestra, which give historical context and structural guidance. The second half of the program then consists of a complete performance of the given work. I find these to be very well done and informative to both novices and more advanced listeners alike. Apart from being perhaps able to catch a persentation at your local orchestra soon, the Beyond the Score Website has a number of complete videos of past presentations with the CSO. I find the Bartok Miraculous Mandarin production with Boulez to be particularly excellent.

Offline Palmetto

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I'm getting a lot from this current Vanderbilt series:
« Reply #43 on: March 14, 2011, 01:14:46 PM »
http://news.vanderbilt.edu/tag/classical-music/

These are recorded videos of a continuing ed class being conducted by Vanderbilt U. in conjunction with the Nashville Symphony.  The audio quality is iffy on the first two, especially the filmed 'Peter and the Wolf' performance presented as an in-class movie.  However, as a beginner I found it well worth the minimal effort to get past the shaky audio, and the quality of the sound improved with the third class.

The symphony conductor and a senior college staffer alternate leading the class.  There are six 90-minute classes at the time I posted this.  It looks like these are being presented on a bi-weekly basis.  I hope this course isn't over, but there are already episodes covering strings, brass and woodwinds, and percussion.

Now if I could just get those darn BBC .RAM files to play  ::)
« Last Edit: March 14, 2011, 02:39:41 PM by Palmetto »

Offline Opus106

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Re: Good Resources for Beginners
« Reply #44 on: March 14, 2011, 11:14:22 PM »
Thanks for the link, Palmetto.

Now if I could just get those darn BBC .RAM files to play  ::)

It's rather strange that the stream doesn't play for you, even with the recommended player.  I have created a bash script which will download the stream and convert it to MP3 before storing it in the hard drive. Due to my ISP's free download time being at ungodly hours, I'll not download them, but if you have access to a Linux machine with mplayer and lame installed, I'll be happy to share the script with you. :)
« Last Edit: March 14, 2011, 11:15:58 PM by Opus106 »
Regards,
Navneeth

Offline Palmetto

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Opus106, I appreciate the offer
« Reply #45 on: March 15, 2011, 03:27:41 AM »
but I don't have access to a Linux machine.  I've dabbled in Linux enough in the past to know that doing so again would just distract from what I'm trying to accomplish here.

Besides, I don't think it would matter.  I notice a lot of the content on the BBC site is blocked from my because apparently my IP address identifies me as not being in the UK.  I suspect this is the same issue with the .RAM files: I can't play them because I can't even access the content.  I sent an e-mail using the site's 'Contacts' link about a week ago but never received a reply.

Offline Opus106

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Re: Good Resources for Beginners
« Reply #46 on: March 15, 2011, 06:10:28 AM »
Besides, I don't think it would matter.  I notice a lot of the content on the BBC site is blocked from my because apparently my IP address identifies me as not being in the UK.  I suspect this is the same issue with the .RAM files: I can't play them because I can't even access the content.  I sent an e-mail using the site's 'Contacts' link about a week ago but never received a reply.

My IP is not from the UK either, and I don't use a proxy, but I can listen to the programmes in question.

Regards,
Navneeth

Offline Palmetto

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I've also found these links to be helpful.
« Reply #47 on: March 28, 2011, 06:07:56 AM »
This site offers some useful 'Getting Started' info, but I found these two pages to be especially useful:

http://www.getintoclassical.com/the-first-step/
http://www.getintoclassical.com/common-complaints/

A great breakdown of symphonic structures and forms in language for the non-musician, using Mozart's Symphony No. 40 as an example:

http://library.thinkquest.org/22673/forms.html

Brahmsian

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Re: I've also found these links to be helpful.
« Reply #48 on: March 28, 2011, 06:51:09 AM »
This site offers some useful 'Getting Started' info, but I found these two pages to be especially useful:

http://www.getintoclassical.com/the-first-step/
http://www.getintoclassical.com/common-complaints/

A great breakdown of symphonic structures and forms in language for the non-musician, using Mozart's Symphony No. 40 as an example:

http://library.thinkquest.org/22673/forms.html

Excellent stuff, Palmetto!   :)  I wish you endless joy in your continued discoveries.

eyeresist

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Re: Good Resources for Beginners
« Reply #49 on: March 28, 2011, 06:05:13 PM »
Quote
Classical will go from pindrop quiet to eardrum-busting loud before you even start to twitch your fingers to the volume control. Initially you’ll probably get really frustrated by this and be constantly adjusting the volume.

I still do, man...

Offline Palmetto

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eyeresist, you and me both.
« Reply #50 on: March 29, 2011, 03:30:06 AM »
I think that's why I wound up listening to several selections from here for a couple of days:

http://www.gardnermuseum.org/music/listen/podcasts

I noticed the changes in volume in these pieces weren't as radical.  Someone later pointed out to me that most of this is chamber music.  At this stage I don't know whether the music was written with fewer volume shifts, if the small number of instruments keeps the volume more stable, if the musicians involved simply chose to play that way, or the likely combination of more than one of the above.

Offline jochanaan

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Re: Good Resources for Beginners
« Reply #51 on: April 01, 2011, 02:47:07 PM »
Someone suggested that I put up here something I suggested in another thread.  The question was how to recognize instrumental tones, and I replied that I knew no better instruction for that than Benjamin Britten's Young Persons' Guide to the Orchestra, also known as the Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Henry Purcell. 8)
Imagination + discipline = creativity

The Diner

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Offline Scots John

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Re: Good Resources for Beginners
« Reply #53 on: February 11, 2013, 01:46:55 PM »
Here is a young fellow who has posted 50 lessons in learning music theory.  If you can get past his lightheartedness, there is much to be learned form this crazy young person!

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB585CE43B02669C3

"Hello, I'm a pianist and piano teacher. This channel is focused on providing 100% free musical education for people who have a passion to learn music, but might not be able to afford it or are curious about music..."

Andrew Furmanczyk
Dear Minimalists:

|

Kind regards
Scots John

Ken B

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Re: Good Resources for Beginners
« Reply #54 on: February 20, 2014, 07:10:03 PM »
Here is a young fellow who has posted 50 lessons in learning music theory.  If you can get past his lightheartedness, there is much to be learned form this crazy young person!

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB585CE43B02669C3

"Hello, I'm a pianist and piano teacher. This channel is focused on providing 100% free musical education for people who have a passion to learn music, but might not be able to afford it or are curious about music..."

Andrew Furmanczyk
Added to my speed dial. Thanks for this

ClassicBoris

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Re: Good Resources for Beginners
« Reply #55 on: March 19, 2014, 04:41:02 PM »
Dear experts in classical music,
 Who was the best conductor to record all of nine symphonies of Beethoven? According to your tastes...
 Who was the first to record all his symphonies? Toscanini and NBC Orchestra in 1930?

Ken B

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Re: Good Resources for Beginners
« Reply #56 on: March 19, 2014, 04:46:55 PM »
Dear experts in classical music,
 Who was the best conductor to record all of nine symphonies of Beethoven? According to your tastes...
 Who was the first to record all his symphonies? Toscanini and NBC Orchestra in 1930?
Your first question could start a war!  :)

I don't know about best but Toscanini is darned good. There should be some Cantelli in the archive. He was Toscanini's protege and brilliant.

Online Que

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Re: Good Resources for Beginners
« Reply #57 on: March 20, 2014, 10:43:29 PM »
Dear experts in classical music,
 Who was the best conductor to record all of nine symphonies of Beethoven? According to your tastes...
 Who was the first to record all his symphonies? Toscanini and NBC Orchestra in 1930?

Welcome to the forum. :) There is an ongoing discussion on that question, to be found here: http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,21417.0.html

On the second question, I believe indeed the first complete cycles came in the 30s, another was by Felix Weingartner on EMI.

Have fun! :)

Q
« Last Edit: March 20, 2014, 10:45:02 PM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

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