Author Topic: The Purcell Thread  (Read 18526 times)

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Offline Rinaldo

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Re: The Purcell Thread
« Reply #160 on: September 10, 2014, 05:19:42 AM »
Happy 355th birthday!

Let's celebrate with the slowest Abdelazer suite ever commited to video:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/MtdBebvbcO0" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/MtdBebvbcO0</a>

Offline radicle

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Re: The Purcell Thread
« Reply #161 on: January 21, 2017, 01:20:40 AM »
Is this really the main Purcell thread?

I've been enjoying the YouTube extracts from this goofy French production of King Arthur; I'd love to have seen it.

Le Concert Spirituel, Hervé Niquet

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/U5UtgAKRZGo" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/U5UtgAKRZGo</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/4CQ3u8y_GF8" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/4CQ3u8y_GF8</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/9x1SUwNm6OI" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/9x1SUwNm6OI</a>

Offline snyprrr

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Re: The Purcell Thread
« Reply #162 on: March 25, 2017, 06:48:16 AM »
anything I'd like?
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Offline Jo498

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Re: The Purcell Thread
« Reply #163 on: March 25, 2017, 11:03:19 AM »
try the viol fantazias
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline snyprrr

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Re: The Purcell Thread
« Reply #164 on: March 26, 2017, 05:15:39 PM »
try the viol fantazias

sounds reasonable ;), thanks
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Purcell Thread
« Reply #165 on: March 26, 2017, 08:51:04 PM »
« Last Edit: March 26, 2017, 09:05:08 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Rinaldo

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Re: The Purcell Thread
« Reply #166 on: September 10, 2017, 09:49:24 AM »
Happy birthday, Henry!

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/a-C4sMI39vs" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/a-C4sMI39vs</a>

Offline cilgwyn

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Re: The Purcell Thread
« Reply #167 on: October 12, 2017, 07:41:49 AM »
It's not my favourite recording;but I was delighted to see that Decca Eloquence have reissued the first ever complete recording of The Fairy Queen,for the first time ever,on cd! :)


Offline snyprrr

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Re: The Purcell Thread HELP ME UNDERSTAND PURCELL
« Reply #168 on: October 12, 2017, 02:52:50 PM »
No yes



BUT SERIOUSLY, WHAT DO I NEED TO HEAR TO "GET" pURCELL? (whoops,sorry!!) I have those viol fantasies on deck to check, but what else? Obviously, singing will probably be out. What's a great slow movement?
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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: The Purcell Thread HELP ME UNDERSTAND PURCELL
« Reply #169 on: October 12, 2017, 07:50:33 PM »
BUT SERIOUSLY, WHAT DO I NEED TO HEAR TO "GET" pURCELL? (whoops,sorry!!) I have those viol fantasies on deck to check, but what else? Obviously, singing will probably be out. What's a great slow movement?

Hey Snyprrr - well, as usual, I'm not sure what your are asking?  ::)  8)

How much Purcell have you heard and own?  Sounds like you want his non-vocal works - right?  If so, then the box below is a good recommendation - if fewer disks are desired, then check the previous pages in this thread - many comments already made.  Dave :)
.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Purcell Thread HELP ME UNDERSTAND PURCELL
« Reply #170 on: October 12, 2017, 08:53:11 PM »
BUT SERIOUSLY, WHAT DO I NEED TO HEAR TO "GET" pURCELL? (whoops,sorry!!) I have those viol fantasies on deck to check, but what else? Obviously, singing will probably be out. What's a great slow movement?

I think you will enjoy this




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Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Purcell Thread HELP ME UNDERSTAND PURCELL
« Reply #171 on: October 13, 2017, 12:55:03 PM »
What's a great slow movement?

Purcell wrote five Pavans for consort,  I think they are rather nice. The recording to get I think is Leonhardt's, easily downloadable but maybe not easy to find on a CD apart from in some huge box of things.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2017, 12:56:38 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline snyprrr

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Re: The Purcell Thread HELP ME UNDERSTAND PURCELL
« Reply #172 on: October 16, 2017, 07:26:51 AM »
Purcell wrote five Pavans for consort,  I think they are rather nice. The recording to get I think is Leonhardt's, easily downloadable but maybe not easy to find on a CD apart from in some huge box of things.

listened to a few minutes of the 'Pavane & Chaconne' in g-minor. Yea, ok, it reminds me of the French consort music I have on an old VoxBox of "French Baroque"...

I need SNOW for this kind of music!!
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Purcell Thread HELP ME UNDERSTAND PURCELL
« Reply #173 on: October 16, 2017, 09:58:14 AM »
listened to a few minutes of the 'Pavane & Chaconne' in g-minor. Yea, ok, it reminds me of the French consort music I have on an old VoxBox of "French Baroque"...

I need SNOW for this kind of music!!

I like the early viol music, but it's very atypical of Purcell. I also think the harpsichord suites are sometimes listenable given the right mood on my part and a decent performance -- but I just don't think you will enjoy them much. The later instrumental music, sonatas, are gallant baroque, they're not my style, so I can't recommend anything. There's some good vocal music including Dido and Aeneas, but you don't want vocal music.

I just don't see you as a late Baroque person.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2017, 10:00:39 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Jo498

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Re: The Purcell Thread
« Reply #174 on: October 17, 2017, 01:37:09 AM »
I don't think the trio/quadro sonatas by Purcell are all that interesting but they are not "gallant late baroque", neither late nor particularly gallant. Historically they are (barely) high baroque if one takes the publication of Corelli's op.1 in 1681 as the exemplary and influential trio sonatas as the beginning of "high baroque" instrumental music. Purcell's harpsichord music and of course many brief instrumental pieces from his theatre music are far more melodic (or even gallant) than the collected chamber sonatas.

Or more practically, a fancier of Telemann's trio sonatas will probably be gravely dissappointed by Purcell's sonatas in three/four parts. I don't dare a guess whether snyppr will like them or not.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Purcell Thread
« Reply #175 on: October 17, 2017, 07:52:30 AM »
I don't think the trio/quadro sonatas by Purcell are all that interesting but they are not "gallant late baroque", neither late nor particularly gallant. Historically they are (barely) high baroque if one takes the publication of Corelli's op.1 in 1681 as the exemplary and influential trio sonatas as the beginning of "high baroque" instrumental music. Purcell's harpsichord music and of course many brief instrumental pieces from his theatre music are far more melodic (or even gallant) than the collected chamber sonatas.

Or more practically, a fancier of Telemann's trio sonatas will probably be gravely dissappointed by Purcell's sonatas in three/four parts. I don't dare a guess whether snyppr will like them or not.

I always thought there was an influence of Corelli to Purcell. For me Corelli is already gallant and late, isn't high baroque just a synonym of late baroque? And the two the same as what in French music is called clacissism?   I'm probably using the terms incorrectly, what's not gallant about the Purcell sonatas? I'd always thought that the sonata in Musical Offering was gallant too - I must just not understand the term.

Anyway I'd appreciate some clarification about these style terms.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2017, 07:56:46 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Biffo

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Re: The Purcell Thread
« Reply #176 on: October 17, 2017, 09:36:55 AM »
I always thought there was an influence of Corelli to Purcell. For me Corelli is already gallant and late, isn't high baroque just a synonym of late baroque? And the two the same as what in French music is called clacissism?   I'm probably using the terms incorrectly, what's not gallant about the Purcell sonatas? I'd always thought that the sonata in Musical Offering was gallant too - I must just not understand the term.

Anyway I'd appreciate some clarification about these style terms.

I had always associated 'galant' with Haydn or early Mozart or possibly J C Bach. According to Wikipedia it is a term used for music between 1720 and 1780. This book (which can be dipped into) more or less agrees but also says 'galant' was a lifestyle - my awkward paraphrase. The author also has something to say about the use of 'baroque' and 'classical' -

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B005RBU93A/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

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