Author Topic: Mozart piano sonatas  (Read 143162 times)

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Offline Omicron9

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #800 on: December 08, 2017, 07:38:16 AM »
I've been listening to Barenboim's Mozart sonatas on YouTube and enjoying them.  Does anyone have his box set of the sonatas; if so, thoughts/comments?

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #801 on: December 08, 2017, 07:45:10 AM »
Bart van Oort on fortepiano, these works are too 'thin' for me on a modern piano while they push a period instrument

The One

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #802 on: January 14, 2018, 06:12:33 AM »
My favorites on this subject are different mixtures of Badura-Skoda, Bezuidenhout, Brendel's late, Eschenbach, Jando, Kraus, Pires, Schiff, Uchida, Van Oort and Zacharias sets. I only deviate for No 8/K310 of Goode, Gilels and Perahia

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #803 on: January 14, 2018, 07:15:18 AM »
Bart van Oort on fortepiano, these works are too 'thin' for me on a modern piano while they push a period instrument

+1
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Offline Omicron9

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #804 on: January 17, 2018, 10:14:15 AM »
Greetings and a happy 2018.

To follow up, I've purchased two "complete" recordings:

Modern: Daniel Barenboim.  I feel as if he is adhering to the score and not putting his stamp on it, which is what I was seeking.

HIP: Kristian Bezuidenhout.  I enjoy his readings, and the PF on the recording sounds lovely, although in spots there are some intonation issues.  Why do labels, performers, and producers allow this?  But overall, I really like it.

Thanks to all for their help, suggestions, and patience.  :)

Kind regards,
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Offline Mahlerian

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #805 on: January 17, 2018, 10:20:08 AM »
HIP: Kristian Bezuidenhout.  I enjoy his readings, and the PF on the recording sounds lovely, although in spots there are some intonation issues.  Why do labels, performers, and producers allow this?  But overall, I really like it.

It could potentially be a conscious decision to tune the instrument in a manner other than equal temperament.  I hear this more often on pre-18th century music, but approximations of equal temperament certainly were not adopted all at once.
"l do not consider my music as atonal, but rather as non-tonal. I feel the unity of all keys. Atonal music by modern composers admits of no key at all, no feeling of any definite center." - Arnold Schoenberg

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #806 on: January 17, 2018, 12:46:46 PM »
Greetings and a happy 2018.

To follow up, I've purchased two "complete" recordings:

Modern: Daniel Barenboim.  I feel as if he is adhering to the score and not putting his stamp on it, which is what I was seeking.

HIP: Kristian Bezuidenhout.  I enjoy his readings, and the PF on the recording sounds lovely, although in spots there are some intonation issues.  Why do labels, performers, and producers allow this?  But overall, I really like it. Maybe he says something about the temperament in the booklet.

Thanks to all for their help, suggestions, and patience.  :)

Kind regards,
-09

I'd be interested if you'd give an example where these intonation issues are clear - just because of Mahlerian's point - if he has chosen a non equal tuning and that's making unexpected dissonances, it could make quite a difference.
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Offline Marc

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #807 on: January 17, 2018, 10:30:44 PM »
I'd be interested if you'd give an example where these intonation issues are clear - just because of Mahlerian's point - if he has chosen a non equal tuning and that's making unexpected dissonances, it could make quite a difference.

Here's a Gramophone review of Volumes 5-7:

https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/mozart-keyboard-music-vols-5-6-7

[...] Bezuidenhout’s stealth weapon, though, may be the unequal temperament of his copy of an 1805 Anton Walter instrument. The popular notion that equal temperament reigned exclusively after JS Bach just isn’t true. Experiments with alternative tuning [...] can be colouristic revelations, which is also true of Bezuidenhout. [...]
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Offline Marc

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #808 on: January 18, 2018, 03:57:24 AM »
I must admit that (apologies to Omicron9), whilst listening to a handful of Barenboim's Mozart sonatas (a friend of mine had the set), I didn't really like it. Even though it must be some 25 years ago, I recall saying something like: "he's playing like a rather inflexible piano teacher or his/her most well behaved pupil: right hand is melody and thus louder, left hand is accompaniment and therefore softer."

I never returned to them.

Barenboim isn't my first pick in Mozart's piano concertos either, but IMO he shows more fantasy and imagination there.
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The One

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #809 on: January 18, 2018, 07:33:32 AM »
Barenboim's Mozart sonatas (a friend of mine had the set), I didn't really like it. Even though it must be some 25 years ago, I recall saying something like: "he's playing like a rather inflexible piano teacher or his/her most well behaved pupil: right hand is melody and thus louder, left hand is accompaniment and therefore softer."

Barenboim isn't my first pick in Mozart's piano concertos either, but IMO he shows more fantasy and imagination there.

I'm more negative about Barenboim's piano. I don't like anything he produced after du Pre and they are the only ones I keep featuring him. I guess I want to say he lacks imagination and is more like a machine. I don't know.

Offline RebLem

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #810 on: January 22, 2018, 11:29:45 AM »
I have 6 sets of the Mozart piano sonatas.  In order of preference, they are Walter Gieseking, Alicia de Larrocha, Lili Kraus, Christoph Eschenbach, Klara Wurtz, and Mitsuko Uchida.  Gieseking has the best command of overall structure, Alicia de Larracha is best at the kind of felictious ornamentation detail that makes certain passages expecially piquant and delightful.  Lili Krauss has a better feel than most for the ambience of the early classical period.
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Offline George

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #811 on: October 30, 2018, 05:54:50 PM »
Yet to find one that I enjoy more. [Uchida]



Now enjoying CD 1 of Uchida's set.

I was in the mood tonight for some Mozart piano sonatas. I started with Geiseking, who seemed "old" and somewhat bland. Then switched to Kraus's mono set which sounded too frenetic for me tonight. Then grabbed Uchida and she seems just right. Hers was my first set.

 
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #812 on: July 14, 2019, 11:53:21 AM »


Six things strike me about Colin Tilney's performances here

1. He uses a very radiant and muscular sounding piano, which has coherent timbres in high and low registers.
2. He punctuates the music in a very frank way, the articulation is clear
3. The general style leans more towards being natural and spontaneous than towards being decorated and embellished.
4. The overall general feeling is joyful
5. In some mysterious and paradoxical way, he manages to be both expressive and restrained
6. He has a knack for making the structure of the whole piece evident

I could well understand that someone would find them mechanical. But I think they're well worth exploring!


(Well recorded) (On Qobuz terribly tagged)
« Last Edit: July 14, 2019, 12:15:00 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #813 on: July 16, 2019, 12:58:30 AM »
Refined and reflective performance of K333 here

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/U2zzju3nS_w" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/U2zzju3nS_w</a>
« Last Edit: July 16, 2019, 01:04:43 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #814 on: August 11, 2019, 01:51:24 AM »
Good 310 here from Ashkenazy in 1967

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/c-Mbg7dx9iI" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/c-Mbg7dx9iI</a>
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