Author Topic: Bach's Cello Suites  (Read 98826 times)

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Offline Moldyoldie

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #80 on: April 21, 2008, 12:13:28 PM »
After intense sampling on Amazon of many recommended recordings, I opted for the Schiff on EMI and the Kirshbaum on Virgin -- fine, divergent interpretations and performances combined with fine sound and the right price.  If it wasn't for that last prerequisite, I'd have gotten the latest Starker on RCA.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2008, 12:15:42 PM by moldyoldie »
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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #81 on: April 21, 2008, 12:15:59 PM »
After intense sampling on Amazon of many recommended recordings, I opted for the Schiff on EMI and the Kirshbaum on Virgin -- divergent interpretations combined with fine sound and the right price.  I enjoy them both.

Very good choices IMO.
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Offline stingo

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #82 on: April 21, 2008, 05:57:22 PM »
I enjoy the Bylsma and the Kirschbaum recordings a lot.

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #83 on: January 27, 2010, 01:14:40 PM »
Beethovenian alias MNDave asked to day  in the "what are you listening to" thread about recommendations for Bach´s suites for solo cello. Options are legio, but here are some of those, I enjoy the most.

Sigiswald Kuijken (Accent), played on violoncello da spalla. An introvert and a bit apollonian rendering, which maybe ought to dance a little more, but it is exceedingly beautiful.

Similar things may be said about the recording of Wieland Kuijken (Arcana) which uses
3 CDs and fills up with the three Sonatas for viola da ganba and harpsichord.
 
Paolo Beschi (Winter & Winter) is playing in the pointed, agile expressive HIP style, we know from Il Giardino Armonico (of which he is a member). Very refreshing.

Among strictly non-period recordings I have a preponderance for my countryman
Morten Zeuthen (Danish Classico) and for Heinrich Schiff (EMI), both contribute with agile and dancing interpretations, and as to general impression maybe the most comvincing I know.

Ralph Kirschbaum (Virgin) gives us another exceedingly beautiful interpretation in a rather subtle and singing style.

Pierre Fournier (Archiv) and Maurice Gendron (Philips) give us noble and balanced interpretations, which already are a little oldfashioned but still impressive.

Janos Starker (Mercury) is completely his own. Everything is so logical and convincing, but he may be an acquired taste.
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Scarpia

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #84 on: January 27, 2010, 01:18:35 PM »
Janos Starker (Mercury) is completely his own. Everything is so logical and convincing, but he may be an acquired taste.

It bothers me that he skips repeats.

Schiff has become my favorite in proper rhythmic style, Rostropovich for an indulgent, romanticize performance.

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #85 on: January 27, 2010, 01:27:50 PM »
It bothers me that he skips repeats.

Schiff has become my favorite in proper rhythmic style, Rostropovich for an indulgent, romanticize performance.

Even Leonhardt skips repeats, so ...
 
Rostropovich is too romantic to these ears.
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Offline Clever Hans

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #86 on: January 27, 2010, 03:43:13 PM »
What about Queyras?

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #87 on: January 28, 2010, 07:49:00 AM »
What about Queyras?

My intention was not to be encyclopedic, but to mention some of the interpretations, which satisfy me the most (at the moment). One could equally well ask: What about Bijlsma? What about Wispelway? What about Casals? And so on.
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Antoine Marchand

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #88 on: January 28, 2010, 08:29:57 AM »
and... Jaap ter Linden 2? Terakado?  :D  (two important sets, I think).

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #89 on: January 28, 2010, 08:51:37 AM »
and... Terakado?  :D  (two important sets, I think).

Terakado´s set is indeed important, but  I definitely prefer S Kuijken.

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Offline Clever Hans

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #90 on: January 28, 2010, 09:34:36 AM »
My intention was not to be encyclopedic, but to mention some of the interpretations, which satisfy me the most (at the moment). One could equally well ask: What about Bijlsma? What about Wispelway? What about Casals? And so on.

Ah. I agree about S. Kuijken.
I think Queyras should be mentioned, though, because he falls in between period and non-period in that he uses steel strings, doesn't hold the cello between his legs, and probably a few other things I'm not qualified to explain.
Although I'm not sure about anyone beyond Bylsma and the Kuijkens holding the violoncello the old way. 

Bulldog

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #91 on: January 28, 2010, 01:56:18 PM »

Rostropovich is too romantic to these ears.

Yes, way too romantic.  He's a great artist, and I just can't understand why he'd want to move Bach forward into the 19th century.

Scarpia

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #92 on: January 28, 2010, 02:01:18 PM »
Yes, way too romantic.  He's a great artist, and I just can't understand why he'd want to move Bach forward into the 19th century.

Works for me.

Offline Bunny

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #93 on: January 28, 2010, 10:24:35 PM »
Yes, way too romantic.  He's a great artist, and I just can't understand why he'd want to move Bach forward into the 19th century.

I don't think Rostropovich wanted to move Bach into the 19th (or 20th) century. He just played the way he knew how to play.  He made no special effort to transport himself back into a 17th-18th century esthetic, but instead played the music as if it had been composed in his lifetime.  There's a certain integrity in this approach: he played Bach on his terms and that is the right of any artist. 

Now whether Rostropovich's Bach performance is to your taste, or even to my taste is a different matter.

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #94 on: January 29, 2010, 05:48:30 AM »
This thread has been created out of two existing threads and the all the posts on the cello suites in the Bach's Chamber & Instrumental Music thread.

Thanks, Que, I had forgotten the existence of this thread.
Now I know, what moderators are good for. :)
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Scarpia

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #95 on: January 29, 2010, 08:32:20 AM »
I have an interest in Boris Pergamenschikow's recording, although Hannsler's asking price is characteristically exorbitant.  Some people express revulsion in the Amazon reviews in a way that attracts me.  Comments? 

Bulldog

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #96 on: January 29, 2010, 09:33:42 AM »
I have an interest in Boris Pergamenschikow's recording, although Hannsler's asking price is characteristically exorbitant.  Some people express revulsion in the Amazon reviews in a way that attracts me.  Comments?

I've had this set for a few years.  I read through those Amazon customer comments that were either saying the set is fabulous or horrendous.  I just think it was an "okay" set not as wayward as Rostropovich or Maisky.  Its best quality was a youthful appeal.  Overall, I don't think it's worth a premium price.

Scarpia

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #97 on: January 29, 2010, 11:12:25 AM »
I've had this set for a few years.  I read through those Amazon customer comments that were either saying the set is fabulous or horrendous.  I just think it was an "okay" set not as wayward as Rostropovich or Maisky.  Its best quality was a youthful appeal.  Overall, I don't think it's worth a premium price.

More or less what I expected to hear.

On a related note, my copy of Fourier's set from DG is a CD release pressed in 1988, I think, the dark days of remastering.  Any impressions from anyone about whether they have done good work remastering this set for current releases?  (It can be obtained very cheaply now, is it worth re-buying?)

Bulldog

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #98 on: January 29, 2010, 11:43:26 AM »
I don't think Rostropovich wanted to move Bach into the 19th (or 20th) century. He just played the way he knew how to play.  He made no special effort to transport himself back into a 17th-18th century esthetic, but instead played the music as if it had been composed in his lifetime.  There's a certain integrity in this approach: he played Bach on his terms and that is the right of any artist. 

I don't quite see it that way, at least concerning the "integrity" premise.  It's more of a "comfort zone" approach.  Unfortunately, his comfort zone and mine are miles apart.

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Re: Bach's Cello Suites
« Reply #99 on: January 29, 2010, 12:25:18 PM »
I have an interest in Boris Pergamenschikow's recording, although Hannsler's asking price is characteristically exorbitant.  Some people express revulsion in the Amazon reviews in a way that attracts me.  Comments?

Light, eloquent, at times almost capricious. Not that searching or deep.
He died from cancer five years later, aged 55.
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