Author Topic: The Early Music Club (EMC)  (Read 192558 times)

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Offline San Antone

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1160 on: February 12, 2018, 08:54:51 AM »
I'm going to listen to this today. But, I'm interested in what other recordings people recommend. So, would you say that organ and lute music would be the earliest music we can locate/perform with reasonable justifiability? Are there any recordings, perhaps with vocals, that have substantial instrumental accompaniment that people can recommend? The earliest organs were small chamber organs? I suppose I should go to the organ thread but I'm just curious how far back we can go exactly to find instrumental music and what instruments exist now for performance? Wikipedia says the Valère organ is the oldest. I shall also search for recordings on it.

This one is good:



Knights, Maids & Miracles : The Spring of Middle Ages
La Reverdie

And La reverdie has others of a similar nature.

Offline milk

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1161 on: February 12, 2018, 07:00:45 PM »
This one is good:



Knights, Maids & Miracles : The Spring of Middle Ages
La Reverdie

And La reverdie has others of a similar nature.
Thanks, I'm going to check it out!

Offline HIPster

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1162 on: February 13, 2018, 02:04:24 PM »
This one is good:



Knights, Maids & Miracles : The Spring of Middle Ages
La Reverdie

And La reverdie has others of a similar nature.
+1

Excellent recommendation!  :)

Online Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1163 on: February 13, 2018, 10:10:03 PM »
That recording from La Reverdie is well worth hearing, I agree. However, when it comes to combining voices and instruments, no one comes close to Mala Punica for me, somehow they create a texture of sounds which, to my ears, is rich and full of mystery.
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Offline San Antone

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1164 on: February 14, 2018, 07:57:56 AM »
That recording from La Reverdie is well worth hearing, I agree. However, when it comes to combining voices and instruments, no one comes close to Mala Punica for me, somehow they create a texture of sounds which, to my ears, is rich and full of mystery.

Yes, Mala Punica is another very good suggestion for repertoire featuring vocals with instruments.  I especially enjoy this one of theirs:


Offline JCBuckley

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1165 on: February 14, 2018, 10:58:01 AM »
Yes, Mala Punica is another very good suggestion for repertoire featuring vocals with instruments.  I especially enjoy this one of theirs:



I have this set, but can't say I listen to it often - I just haven't learned to love Jill Feldman's voice. Mea culpa. But the voice of Lena Susanne Norin, on the other hand:

« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 09:21:25 AM by JCBuckley »

Offline San Antone

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1166 on: February 14, 2018, 11:20:52 AM »
I have this set, but can't say I listen to it often - I just haven't learned to love Jill Feldman's voice. Mea culpa. But the voice of Lena Susanne Norin, on the other hand:

I like them both, but had forgotten about that Figures of Harmony set.  Lots to listen to.  ;)

Offline San Antone

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1167 on: February 15, 2018, 05:37:41 AM »


Antoine Brumel : Missa Berzerette savoyenne
Chanticleer

Takes its title and much of its distinctive material from a French chanson by Josquin des Prez.  This recording may be the only one, but I haven't looked.  It is good, Chanticleer is an all male group, which suits me perfectly.

Offline San Antone

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1168 on: February 20, 2018, 03:15:46 AM »
In the process of looking for music by Thomas Ashwell I came across an interesting YouTube channel: "Graindelavoix Bootlegs".  You can listen to gems such as this:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/7bHXaF40Tmg" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/7bHXaF40Tmg</a>

Pedro Ruimonte : Lamentations
GRAINDELAVOIX
Live-recording, April 2017

Offline San Antone

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1169 on: March 02, 2018, 05:36:52 AM »
Some recent purchases from Hyperion, Tudor composers ...



Nicholas Ludford (c1490-1557)
Missa Videte miraculum & Ave Maria, ancilla Trinitatis
Westminster Abbey Choir, James O'Donnell (conductor)

Christopher Tye (c1505-before 15 March 1573)
Missa Euge bone & Western Wynde Mass
Westminster Abbey Choir, James O'Donnell (conductor)

John Taverner (c1490-1545)
Missa Mater Christi sanctissima & Western Wynde Mass
Westminster Abbey Choir, James O'Donnell (conductor)

Offline Biffo

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1170 on: March 02, 2018, 05:59:34 AM »
Some recent purchases from Hyperion, Tudor composers ...



Nicholas Ludford (c1490-1557)
Missa Videte miraculum & Ave Maria, ancilla Trinitatis
Westminster Abbey Choir, James O'Donnell (conductor)

Christopher Tye (c1505-before 15 March 1573)
Missa Euge bone & Western Wynde Mass
Westminster Abbey Choir, James O'Donnell (conductor)

John Taverner (c1490-1545)
Missa Mater Christi sanctissima & Western Wynde Mass
Westminster Abbey Choir, James O'Donnell (conductor)

I will be interested to hear what you think of the Ludford album; I have just bought it as a lossless download from the Hyperion website. I already have the Taverner album and just been listening to some of it for comparison purposes.

Offline Que

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1171 on: March 03, 2018, 02:47:07 AM »
My first encounter with this all male ensemble "Beauty Farm"

Quote
Beauty Farm founded 2014 by Markus Muntean and Bernhard Trebuch is a vocal group focused to the Franco-Flemish polyphony of the renaissance. The international ensemble is based in the carthusian monastery at Mauerbach (Austria). The singers are members of well known ensembles like «Capilla flamenca», «Huelgas Ensemble», «Vox Luminis», «Collegium Vocale Gent» and «Graindelavoix».



Opinions elsewhere range from raving to cautiously positive.

My first impressions. The music is not transposed up and receives the deep & sonorous "continental" treatment, thank God..... ::)
The style of the ensemble has been compared with that of The Sound and the Fury. There is some resemblance in that the approach is more personalised, less detached. But it stops there: TSAF are at their worst slap dash, uneven and over the top in their "emotional" approach. Beauty Farm occupies, with Cinquecento, the middle ground, compared to the more "detached" Egidius and Singer Pur on the other side of the spectrum. What I like is the overall sound of the ensemble - individual voices blend well together, no "jarring" counter tenor....

Technically, this recording debut is no match for the ensembles mentioned before (excluding TSAF). The ensemble work doesn't run like clockwork in terms of timing and intonation. It's good, but not to same same level of perfection. This affects the level of vocal clarity and obscures the texts. I have to say that this improves during proceedings and the motets on the 2nd come off better. What also improves on the way is the flexibility - at first it seemed they picked a pace and stuck to it from motet to motet.

Oddly, there appeared a strange low soft rumble in the first two motets on the 2nd disc. After first thinking it came from the neighbours, I  came to the conclusion that one of the tenors came to close to the microphone. This is slightly distracting and could have been avoided by a retake...  ::)

All in all, I basically quite like their approach and their ensemble sound.
And they present an unmatched complete collection of Gombert's motets.
Which, by the way, are idiosyncratic and not very accessible, according to some reviewers..... An acquired tatste, with recommended listening of only a few motets at a time... I honestly have NO clue what they are on about....  ???

Despite some of the mentioned quibbles, this is an excellent issue which is perhaps not perfect but certainly more than good enough for me. Looking forward to the 2nd volume! :)

Q
« Last Edit: March 03, 2018, 02:49:29 AM by Que »
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Online Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1172 on: March 03, 2018, 06:13:39 AM »
The problem for me with that recording is that they make so many of  the motets sound drab and samey. This is partly because of the inexpressive rhythms, and also because they're  harmonically too conservative, so the dissonances don't ring forth.I prefer Sound and Fury singing Gombert motets, and I'm pretty oblivious to their ensemble and intonation "problems" thank goodness!

I'm saying this with more confidence than I should because these motets haven't been recorded elsewhere very much - I mean for all I know the problem could be Gombert's rather than Beauty Farm's.

I also am oblivious to rumble in CD 2 - I wonder what's going on.

On the positive side, I like Beauty Farm's bass.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2018, 06:15:24 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Que

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1173 on: March 03, 2018, 06:44:17 AM »
The problem for me with that recording is that they make so many of  the motets sound drab and samey. This is partly because of the inexpressive rhythms, and also because they're  harmonically too conservative, so the dissonances don't ring forth.

I agree about the inexpressive rhythms, what I called inflexibility in pace. I don't mind their harmonic treatment - it is not more conservative then many of the other ensembles, except for TSATF.

Quote
I prefer Sound and Fury singing Gombert motets, and I'm pretty oblivious to their ensemble and intonation "problems" thank goodness!

I am not familiar with TSATF's Gombert recordings - I compared general styles - perhaps their ensemble work and intonation there is impeccable! Do you prefer them to Beauty Farm?  :)

Quote
I also am oblivious to rumble in CD 2 - I wonder what's going on.

Coincides with and follows the contribution of one of the tenors. Tracks 1 & 2.
I saw somewhere a remark on "sensitive" microphones, I suspect it was referring to the same.

Quote
On the positive side, I like Beauty Farm's bass.

Which is quite nice....  :)

Q
« Last Edit: March 03, 2018, 07:29:11 AM by Que »
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kishnevi

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1174 on: March 03, 2018, 10:35:50 AM »
Crossposting the pertinent portion of a post posted in WAYLTN




About the Bauldewyn: it's two CDs, two masses for five voices, one for four voices, one for six voices. Sonics are a bit close, but not too close. The bass voice often comes across as a drone (think of those Russian deep basses). There is no real attempt to blend the outer voices: the usual aural image is the top voice and bottom voice operating independently, with the middle voices singing in parallel or in canon, as an acoustic block between the outer voices. How much of that effect is due to Bauldewyn and how much to Beauty Farm, I can't say.

Bumping this post as it relates to Beauty Farm. Perhaps what I heard as a bass drone springs from the same source as Que's rumble?

Offline Que

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1175 on: March 03, 2018, 11:34:57 AM »
Bumping this post as it relates to Beauty Farm. Perhaps what I heard as a bass drone springs from the same source as Que's rumble?

Thanks for that.  :) 

I'm very curious to hear those recordings, not in the least because of the uniqueness of the repertoire.

Q
« Last Edit: March 03, 2018, 11:57:09 AM by Que »
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Offline aligreto

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1176 on: March 03, 2018, 02:07:43 PM »
My first encounter with this all male ensemble "Beauty Farm"



Opinions elsewhere range from raving to cautiously positive.

My first impressions. The music is not transposed up and receives the deep & sonorous "continental" treatment, thank God..... ::)
The style of the ensemble has been compared with that of The Sound and the Fury. There is some resemblance in that the approach is more personalised, less detached. But it stops there: TSAF are at their worst slap dash, uneven and over the top in their "emotional" approach. Beauty Farm occupies, with Cinquecento, the middle ground, compared to the more "detached" Egidius and Singer Pur on the other side of the spectrum. What I like is the overall sound of the ensemble - individual voices blend well together, no "jarring" counter tenor....

Technically, this recording debut is no match for the ensembles mentioned before (excluding TSAF). The ensemble work doesn't run like clockwork in terms of timing and intonation. It's good, but not to same same level of perfection. This affects the level of vocal clarity and obscures the texts. I have to say that this improves during proceedings and the motets on the 2nd come off better. What also improves on the way is the flexibility - at first it seemed they picked a pace and stuck to it from motet to motet.

Oddly, there appeared a strange low soft rumble in the first two motets on the 2nd disc. After first thinking it came from the neighbours, I  came to the conclusion that one of the tenors came to close to the microphone. This is slightly distracting and could have been avoided by a retake...  ::)

All in all, I basically quite like their approach and their ensemble sound.
And they present an unmatched complete collection of Gombert's motets.
Which, by the way, are idiosyncratic and not very accessible, according to some reviewers..... An acquired tatste, with recommended listening of only a few motets at a time... I honestly have NO clue what they are on about....  ???

Despite some of the mentioned quibbles, this is an excellent issue which is perhaps not perfect but certainly more than good enough for me. Looking forward to the 2nd volume! :)

Q

Excellent post Que!
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Online Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1177 on: March 03, 2018, 11:05:39 PM »
Thanks for that.  :) 

I'm very curious to hear those recordings, not in the least because of the uniqueness of the repertoire.

Q

I've found their Ockeghem to be their most rewarding recording, though this probably just refelects my interest in the composer,  for once we hear an Ockeghem which does justice to the ideas of Krenek.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2018, 11:08:20 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Que

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1178 on: March 04, 2018, 01:09:59 AM »
I've found their Ockeghem to be their most rewarding recording, though this probably just refelects my interest in the composer,  for once we hear an Ockeghem which does justice to the ideas of Krenek.

Ockeghem is an amazing composer - amongst the greatest!  :)

Anyway, I believe we have discussed this before on the Ockeghem thread ... but the regular Early Music Amazon reviewer Gio didn't like the Ockeghem. He did like the Gombert recordings.
Now, I know it's just an opinion, but I find his tastes and mine align frequently.  :) His description sound like TSATF on a bad day.... However, other reviews have been more positive. A recurrent complaint is that the microphones are too close...


Something else - Beauty Farm's newest recording (2CD set):



http://frabernardo.com/?portfolio=la-rue-masses-beauty-farm

Q

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Online Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1179 on: March 04, 2018, 10:11:47 AM »
Just ignore Gio. They're not brusque, and Ockeghem isn't Apollonian. The "bumptious" complaint is interesting precisely because Gio likes the individuality of the voices of Capella Pratensis but apparently not of Beauty Farm. If you look in the commentaries section of the review you'll see I had a brief discussion with him about it.

Part of the problem, que, is that you're still living in the 20th century, and you can't just check these things out via streaming.

I listened to the B minor mass this morning, I've decided that I'm a Medieval at heart. I mean, all those catchy tunes and that flashy orchestra - it's more like an entertainment for the rich at their leisure than a prayer!

(One interesting thing in that review is that he says that Gomber is harmonically daring and Ockeghem ain't, I wonder what other people think of that. It certainly wasn't Krenek's view)
« Last Edit: March 04, 2018, 10:22:41 AM by Mandryka »
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