Author Topic: The Early Music Club (EMC)  (Read 215104 times)

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Offline JCBuckley

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1260 on: January 15, 2019, 07:17:04 AM »
if you get hold of the booklet essay that Schmelzer wrote on Machaut, you'll see that Warburg is a serious inspiration for him. I may ask one of the London bookshops if they can get a copy for me to look at before deciding whether to buy, Foyles may do it in fact, they've done that sort of thing for me before. The publisher's website here has more images, but hardly helpful really

https://www.merpaperkunsthalle.org/projects/view/1306

As you say, not very helpful. But thanks for the tip about Foyles - I'll drop in, next time I'm up in London.

Offline Vinbrulé

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1261 on: January 15, 2019, 09:47:47 PM »
What a surprise to hear the 'true' voice (but is it correct to say so?) of Andreas Scholl in "Durch Barbarei" and "Wes mich mein buehl"  !!  A very pleasant,warm and clear baritone voice.  Marc Lewon and Crawford Young together in the instrumental group.
Now I'm anxious to listen to the Ensemble Leones in the same (more or less) repertoire !

Offline San Antone

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1262 on: January 19, 2019, 12:33:40 AM »


Faidit: Troubadour Music from the 12th-13th Centuries
Andras Kecskes, Gerard le Vot

A very nice selection of music from 12th-13th centuries, arranged and performed very well, imo.  Gerard le Vot's name came up in the Purchases thread and led me to this CD.  Andras Kecskes leads this ensemble, and I think he plays lute and other stringed instruments.

Some wiki info on the composer:

Gaucelm Faidit (Old Occitan [ɡawˈtʃɛlm fajˈdit] literally "Gaucelm the Dispossessed" c. 1156 – c. 1209) was a troubadour, born in Uzerche, in the Limousin, from a family of knights in service of the count of Turenne. He travelled widely in France, Spain, and Hungary. His known patrons include Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany and Dalfi d'Alvernha; he was at one time in Poitiers at the court of Richard I of England, for whose death he wrote a famous planh (lament) in 1199. It is possible, but controversial, that Gaucelm took part in the Third Crusade from 1189–1191; it seems clear that in 1202 he set out on the Fourth Crusade, as did his current patron, Boniface of Montferrat. After 1202 there is no further historical trace of him.

About seventy of Gaucelm's poems and fourteen of his melodies survive. Six poems are addressed to Boniface of Montferrat, and twelve to Maria de Ventadorn. Several of his poems are accompanied in the manuscripts by detailed explanations (razós), usually concerning love affairs and rivalries that allegedly inspired the poems. These tales involve Gaucelm with Hugh IX of Lusignan, his son Hugh X, Alfonso II, Count of Provence, and others.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2019, 12:37:39 AM by San Antone »

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1263 on: January 20, 2019, 05:00:27 AM »
I know four recordings which have in their title "Roman de Fauvel" -- Joel Cohen, Thomas Binkley, Marc Mauillon and Rene Clemencic. I don't find any of them specially rewarding, maybe it's a consequence the nature of the beast, as it were, or just my personal taste in voices. Then I remembered that the manuscript for the Roman includes songs by Jean Lescurel, and like a divine recompense after wasting my time in the arid plains of the Roman de Fauvel, I find this drop dead gorgeous recording from Dominique Vellard

« Last Edit: January 20, 2019, 05:01:58 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Que

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1264 on: January 20, 2019, 05:05:15 AM »
I know four recordings which have in their title "Roman de Fauvel" -- Joel Cohen, Thomas Binkley, Marc Mauillon and Rene Clemencic. I don't find any of them specially rewarding, maybe it's a consequence the nature of the beast, as it were, or just my personal taste in voices. Then I remembered that the manuscript for the Roman includes songs by Jean Lescurel, and like a divine recompense after wasting my time in the arid plains of the Roman de Fauvel, I find this drop dead gorgeous recording from Dominique Vellard



Here is the reissue:


Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline Vinbrulé

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1265 on: January 21, 2019, 07:27:11 AM »


I noticed as well!  :)
Anyone familiar with them care to comment?
My main issue would be if the perfomance styles are still relevant or outdated?
Since recordings range from 1985 - 2015 and several ensembles are involved, the picture might be mixed...

Q
This box is full of beautiful things.  Soprano Sabine Lutzenberger is present in almost all the discs .  The Vogelweide CD is very good, and so is the Wolkenstein CD from Ensemble Leones (there is another E.Leones disc -CD10- with several Wolkenstein pieces)
But I would like to mention the Sabine Lutzenberger's impressive tour de force in "Der Taugenhort" by Heinrich von Meissen .  Her delightful voice and the magic flute of Norbert Rodenkirchen, nobody else !!!   Hats off !!!! wow  :)

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1266 on: January 21, 2019, 12:25:20 PM »
This box is full of beautiful things.  Soprano Sabine Lutzenberger is present in almost all the discs .  The Vogelweide CD is very good, and so is the Wolkenstein CD from Ensemble Leones (there is another E.Leones disc -CD10- with several Wolkenstein pieces)
But I would like to mention the Sabine Lutzenberger's impressive tour de force in "Der Taugenhort" by Heinrich von Meissen .  Her delightful voice and the magic flute of Norbert Rodenkirchen, nobody else !!!   Hats off !!!! wow  :)

You should treat yourself to this (I don't think it's in the box)



This too, I don't think it's there either



She's also on an "experimental" Wolkenstein recording, which I've not heard in fact



For a completely different approach to Wolkenstein, and IMO at least as satisfying, there's this -- this is the CD which got me interested in the music



« Last Edit: January 21, 2019, 12:33:16 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Vinbrulé

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1267 on: January 22, 2019, 12:45:41 AM »
I have seen some Eberhard Kummer video on YouTube :  he not only performs medieval music and poetry , he IS a fascinating medieval man  :) :)
His approach to Wolkenstein is very different from the others I know.  Formidable !!! 
The CD he made is unavailable .  I will try to contact him by mail , perhaps ....... :)

P.S.  Le Roman de la Rose is not included in the 11cd box , but it was already present in my fast growing (too fast ?)  medieval music collection.
       Not even the Lutzenberger/Rodenkirchen CD (with stunning cover photo) is included :  just ordered .   Thanks.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2019, 09:25:55 AM by Vinbrulé »

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1268 on: January 23, 2019, 12:07:53 PM »
I have seen some Eberhard Kummer video on YouTube :  he not only performs medieval music and poetry , he IS a fascinating medieval man  :) :)

Another artist to explore, much more quintessentially medieval than Eberhard Kummer, is René Zosso.


<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/mIq07QYdab4" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/mIq07QYdab4</a>
« Last Edit: January 23, 2019, 12:09:28 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Vinbrulé

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1269 on: January 31, 2019, 09:06:09 AM »
The thing that I like about Mala Punica is that they were pioneers, pioneers of a smooth and fluid style, much more sensual than the a cappella singers (Orlando,  and the previous generation of performers with instruments (e.g. the stuff Catherine Bott did with Philip Pickett or indeed La Reverdie) This style has become an element of the mainstream, I think for the good but I can't argue for that, examples include Graindelavoix and Tetraktys.

I agree with your point about sound though for me it's certainly not a deal breaker. No point in arguing about singers, you either like Jill Feldman or you don't, end of.

Re Landini, try Binkley, I think it's rather good,


Oh well  !!!  Thanks to God (and to Mandryka) I have finally found a completely satisfying disc of Francesco Landini's music.
There remains , to a negligible extent, the post-coitum / post-cannabis sound atmosphere that Memelsdorf & MalaPunica push to an excessive(IMO) level, in the Arcana recording. Evidently this is a sound aura that the music itself of Landini requires. 
Very beautiful. Listening the two singers involved , it is CLEAR that they are singing an Italian text , not a text written in a language from a distant galaxy !!!
[ I apologize for polemizing so much against the three CDs made by Memelsdorf for Arcana ( I bought them all three) .... where instead "Missa Cantilena" and "Helas avril" made for Erato are IMHO absolutely involving, without reserve.  And more :  "Narcisso speculando" with madrigals by Paolo da Firenze is worthy of being appointed Desert Island Disc . So I can say that Pedro gets better as the years go by :) :) :)  ]
P.S.  I find Missa Cantilena 'irresistible'  ( generally speaking, for reasons of mine, I don't love much Masses ..... but there are three of them I adore : Janacek , Stravinsky and Frank Martin .  I add to these now the Memelsdorff/Perugia/Teramo Mass.  Great achievement !!  Thanks.  W la Musica . 
« Last Edit: January 31, 2019, 09:19:25 AM by Vinbrulé »

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1270 on: February 01, 2019, 10:28:21 PM »
Oh well  !!!  Thanks to God (and to Mandryka) I have finally found a completely satisfying disc of Francesco Landini's music.
There remains , to a negligible extent, the post-coitum / post-cannabis sound atmosphere that Memelsdorf & MalaPunica push to an excessive(IMO) level, in the Arcana recording. Evidently this is a sound aura that the music itself of Landini requires. 
Very beautiful. Listening the two singers involved , it is CLEAR that they are singing an Italian text , not a text written in a language from a distant galaxy !!!
[ I apologize for polemizing so much against the three CDs made by Memelsdorf for Arcana ( I bought them all three) .... where instead "Missa Cantilena" and "Helas avril" made for Erato are IMHO absolutely involving, without reserve.  And more :  "Narcisso speculando" with madrigals by Paolo da Firenze is worthy of being appointed Desert Island Disc . So I can say that Pedro gets better as the years go by :) :) :)  ]
P.S.  I find Missa Cantilena 'irresistible'  ( generally speaking, for reasons of mine, I don't love much Masses ..... but there are three of them I adore : Janacek , Stravinsky and Frank Martin .  I add to these now the Memelsdorff/Perugia/Teramo Mass.  Great achievement !!  Thanks.  W la Musica .

If their discography here is accurate

https://www.discogs.com/artist/844152-Studio-Der-Fr%C3%BChen-Musik

then they were really unbelievably productive around 1972, I like most of the music  I’ve heard of theirs from that year - Ciconia, Machaut, Walkenstein, Landidni. Maybe (I’m not 100% sure about this) at this time, Tomas Binkley was using instruments discretely. I especially like his lute. 

« Last Edit: February 01, 2019, 10:37:33 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Vinbrulé

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1271 on: February 02, 2019, 12:40:32 AM »
If their discography here is accurate

https://www.discogs.com/artist/844152-Studio-Der-Fr%C3%BChen-Musik

then they were really unbelievably productive around 1972, I like most of the music  I’ve heard of theirs from that year - Ciconia, Machaut, Walkenstein, Landidni. Maybe (I’m not 100% sure about this) at this time, Tomas Binkley was using instruments discretely. I especially like his lute.
  The chansons de Machaut are pretty well done , as well,  by the Binkley group. ( I have volume 1 ).
But I sadly miss the Ferrara Ensemble CD devoted to Machaut  "  Merci ou mort " .  Not to be found.  Hoping in some future non-expensive multi CD box from Arcana/Outhere , including this Machaut.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1272 on: February 02, 2019, 12:46:56 AM »
  The chansons de Machaut are pretty well done , as well,  by the Binkley group. ( I have volume 1 ).
But I sadly miss the Ferrara Ensemble CD devoted to Machaut  "  Merci ou mort " .  Not to be found.  Hoping in some future non-expensive multi CD box from Arcana/Outhere , including this Machaut.

Let me know if you want me to upload it for you.
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Offline (: premont :)

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Offline Vinbrulé

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1274 on: February 02, 2019, 01:48:10 AM »
And a Binkley discography here:

http://www.medieval.org/emfaq/performers/binkley.html
The late Thomas Binkley founded the Early Music Institute ( or Historical Performance Instutute ) in 1980 , at the Indiana University, Bloomington.
I think this is the same institute where the lutenist Nigel North teaches. 
The Institute also offer to sell some CD recordings  :  http://www.iumusicmarketplace.com/SearchResults.asp?Cat=23

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1275 on: February 02, 2019, 09:55:15 AM »
The late Thomas Binkley founded the Early Music Institute ( or Historical Performance Instutute ) in 1980 , at the Indiana University, Bloomington.
I think this is the same institute where the lutenist Nigel North teaches. 
The Institute also offer to sell some CD recordings  :  http://www.iumusicmarketplace.com/SearchResults.asp?Cat=23

Has anyone tried the Dufay masses that Binkley recorded with The Pro Arte Singers?
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Offline Vinbrulé

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1276 on: February 04, 2019, 09:39:45 AM »
 :-\   Arrived this morning, immediately put it on the player ......  the beginning reminds me of the unmistakable sonic flavour of the Tasto Solo recordings (two members of TS are playing in this disc, Perez and Catalunya) ..... I am fascinated, but also puzzled ..... The perception of something that has been too much "manipulated" is very strong.  Put aside for the moment :  His Time Will Come !!

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1277 on: February 04, 2019, 11:17:11 AM »
:-\   Arrived this morning, immediately put it on the player ......  the beginning reminds me of the unmistakable sonic flavour of the Tasto Solo recordings (two members of TS are playing in this disc, Perez and Catalunya) ..... I am fascinated, but also puzzled ..... The perception of something that has been too much "manipulated" is very strong.  Put aside for the moment :  His Time Will Come !!

Yes, they sound processed like Queen in Bohemian Rhapsody.  I like it very much. In the booklet he says this, which I thought was interesting

Quote
The guiding thread in all these pieces by Paolo is an aesthetic that new in fifteenth-century music: long melodic sequences, almost tonal in character and intention, go hand in hand with an old-fashioned harmonic ( solemnity. It is as if he was trying to revive structurally the music language of the beginning of the fourteenth century, while at the same time offering a new style of his own. With hindsight, we can see that it is in spirit to the later than the early Renaissance, then only just corning into view.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2019, 11:26:53 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Vinbrulé

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1278 on: February 07, 2019, 07:33:23 AM »
Good compilation of Wolkenstein songs
I particularly liked Andrea von Ramm numbers : in track 6 ( Der mai mit lieber zal ) she displays an astonishing agility that almost equals that of Catherine Bott in the same song (Oiseau Lyre disc) but, apart from agility, she is a bit more colourful and ironic than Bott.
In track 1 Bariton Karl-Heinz Klein sings all the 7 stanzas of the autobiographic "Es fuegt sich" ( 11 minutes long ).  I liked him , but Eberhard Kummer is another world  :)
The analogic recording dates back to 1970 , the sound is magnificent IMO
« Last Edit: February 07, 2019, 07:35:32 AM by Vinbrulé »

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Early Music Club (EMC)
« Reply #1279 on: February 07, 2019, 08:21:15 AM »
I bet you'll enjoy hearing this




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