Author Topic: Magnus Lindberg's lair  (Read 10700 times)

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Offline lescamil

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #80 on: July 20, 2011, 07:29:29 PM »
Typical snyprrr, going first for the piece with the string quartet in it. Don't forget about Kari Kriikku! He is perhaps one of the best clarinetists alive. He is perhaps one of the few people out there (other than possibly Martin Fröst) who could play some of these crazy clarinet concertos being written today. Lindberg's is far from crazy, but it has some real hair-raising passages. I've talked bad about it in the past, saying that he was selling out to his audience in it, but its a lovely work that departs from his style a bit, even nowadays when he has noticeably let down the reins a bit. The Clarinet Quintet is lovely, too, but in a much different way. I'd like to hear him write for JUST a string quartet.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #81 on: July 20, 2011, 07:38:57 PM »
Typical snyprrr, going first for the piece with the string quartet in it. Don't forget about Kari Kriikku! He is perhaps one of the best clarinetists alive. He is perhaps one of the few people out there (other than possibly Martin Fröst) who could play some of these crazy clarinet concertos being written today. Lindberg's is far from crazy, but it has some real hair-raising passages. I've talked bad about it in the past, saying that he was selling out to his audience in it, but its a lovely work that departs from his style a bit, even nowadays when he has noticeably let down the reins a bit. The Clarinet Quintet is lovely, too, but in a much different way. I'd like to hear him write for JUST a string quartet.

I think there's many composers who "sellout" at some point. Look at Stravinsky, for example, he could have expanded so much on The Rite of Spring, but he didn't, he went the Neoclassical route, which is fine by me, the man was a master composer regardless of what direction he went in. I think the same applies to Lindberg. His early works are some spitfire, hell-raising stuff with some avant-garde cross-currents weaving in and out of the sonic tapestries. I'm not too impressed with his earlier output. I like the direction his music is going in now --- more tonal. He still sounds unmistakably like himself as his harmonic language is a particular one as his friend and colleague Salonen pointed out in an interview.

I think it was a famous jazz guitarist, Jim Hall, who said "Where can I go to sell out?" In my opinion, if I like the direction a composer is going in, I'm going to stick with them.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2011, 07:40:56 PM by Mirror Image »
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Offline lescamil

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #82 on: July 20, 2011, 10:16:09 PM »
Well, I don't have much of a problem anymore with Lindberg's "selling out" as of late. He is still a very good composer who can write excellent music. I thought his latest work Al Largo was a nice, engaging piece. Lindberg really is, to me, one of the composers today I have the least amount of problems with. I even like his earlier works like KRAFT, UR, and the Kinetics-Marea-Joy trilogy. The Piano Concerto continues to be my favorite work of his (hell, I'd maybe even consider playing it someday). I don't think negatively of his more recent works anymore, like I used to about the Clarinet Concerto and Seht die Sonne (when I heard the premiere).
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #83 on: July 20, 2011, 10:23:47 PM »
Well, I don't have much of a problem anymore with Lindberg's "selling out" as of late. He is still a very good composer who can write excellent music. I thought his latest work Al Largo was a nice, engaging piece. Lindberg really is, to me, one of the composers today I have the least amount of problems with. I even like his earlier works like KRAFT, UR, and the Kinetics-Marea-Joy trilogy. The Piano Concerto continues to be my favorite work of his (hell, I'd maybe even consider playing it someday). I don't think negatively of his more recent works anymore, like I used to about the Clarinet Concerto and Seht die Sonne (when I heard the premiere).

I just think that Lindberg is mellowing out and, this, for me, is a good thing as I've been doing the same.
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Offline snyprrr

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #84 on: July 22, 2011, 08:37:12 AM »
Typical snyprrr, going first for the piece with the string quartet in it. Don't forget about Kari Kriikku! He is perhaps one of the best clarinetists alive. He is perhaps one of the few people out there (other than possibly Martin Fröst) who could play some of these crazy clarinet concertos being written today. Lindberg's is far from crazy, but it has some real hair-raising passages. I've talked bad about it in the past, saying that he was selling out to his audience in it, but its a lovely work that departs from his style a bit, even nowadays when he has noticeably let down the reins a bit. The Clarinet Quintet is lovely, too, but in a much different way. I'd like to hear him write for JUST a string quartet.

No, not just a 'String Quartet Thing',... not only is this my fav ML piece, it's also my fav CQ!! The one 'hair raising' part I like the best is when the clarinet makes that looong note,... yes, this is definitely a 'Clarinet Quintet'. If you've heard the Kimmo Hakola/Ondine disc with KK, then you know that not everyone is writing Masterpieces for CQ!! Hakola goes on for just waaay too long considering the general lack of materials used (IMO!!).

No, I just think ML wrote this piece a) at the right time, and, b) for the right people,... this is the height of what I like about ML's earlier phase. He claimed that he's never written an Adagio, and this CQ really zips along, taking us on a journey (albeit, in a fairly claustrophobic environment of 'cool passion').
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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #85 on: January 02, 2013, 02:09:45 AM »
i checked out a lot of lindberg's CDs from local libraries and etc a while back on a recommendation from someone that i explore his music, (or more accurately a critique of my, at the time, highly reactionary compositions: "stop listening to shostakovich and john williams" [two composers i've never actually liked] "and check out some really worthwhile composers, like magnus lindberg")

i listened to quite a lot and found most of it... on the inaccessible side. idk. the pieces seemed to be filled with lots and lots of relatively empty pattern-making, thick and dull-sounding orchestration and musical ideas that all sound basically the same. they are well crafted—the more recent works in particular—but it's difficult to tell what to pay attention to, & the 'sameness' makes a lot of the music rather boring after awhile; a piece like the widely-praised Clarinet Concerto i found a pretty laboured listen with only an appreciation of great technical skill to mitigate. it follows the letter, but not the spirit, of Romanticism.

i will put in a good word for this disc though - despite the higher level of dissonance, i found that the rhythmic propulsiveness and greater variety of ideas made these pieces much more accessible than his work from e.g. Corrente onwards. they stimulate the mind somewhat more. maybe i'm the only person who's found this. i can't speak for any more lasting impact than his more "consonant" pieces—no idea which of these i'd return to—but they are at least more engaging on a superficial level.


the only pieces of lindberg's i've found myself really returning to are Tendenza (to an extent) and Action-Situation-Signification, which is like nothing else in his output and much the better for it >:)

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #86 on: January 02, 2013, 09:16:11 AM »
I'm pretty surprised to see you lump Shostakovich and a hack like John Williams together. I definitely don't think John Williams is a worthwhile composer. Shostakovich, on the other hand, was a serious, troubled composer who, while not necessarily an innovator, is a very worthwhile composer IMHO. You're obviously free to feel any way you want about the music, but history has proven Shostakovich's worth as a composer and, in turn, has been quite kind to him. I can't predict the future, but I can honestly say that Shostakovich will probably enjoy a nice, fruitful existence in the concert hall unlike someone like John Williams who didn't compose anything that could be taken as a piece of art. All in my opinion of course.

As far as Lindberg goes, I found his early music to not be very distinctive. It's just one wash to me. There's no substance or variety in the music. It works completely on a dissonant level, which doesn't necessarily appeal to me. I like composers who can provide relief from the dissonance. Thankfully, for me,  Lindberg's later music has proven to be quite good and contain plenty of melodic ideas that help me access the music. There's still dissonance, but there's plenty of access points that help guide the listener along. For me, Graffiti is one of his better newer compositions. Concerto for Orchestra is also enjoyable. Of his early music, I do like Kraft. I think that's one of his better works from this period.

Anyway, we enjoy what we enjoy and that's all that matters in the end.
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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #87 on: January 02, 2013, 09:58:19 AM »
I'm pretty surprised to see you lump Shostakovich and a hack like John Williams together. I definitely don't think John Williams is a worthwhile composer. Shostakovich, on the other hand, was a serious, troubled composer who, while not necessarily an innovator, is a very worthwhile composer IMHO. You're obviously free to feel any way you want about the music, but history has proven Shostakovich's worth as a composer and, in turn, has been quite kind to him. I can't predict the future, but I can honestly say that Shostakovich will probably enjoy a nice, fruitful existence in the concert hall unlike someone like John Williams who didn't compose anything that could be taken as a piece of art. All in my opinion of course.

well, i wasn't the one who lumped them together; that was the person who told me to stop composing in "that style" (which apparently to them meant "anything with consonance in it"). all i said was that neither one was a composer i was especially interested in. williams's concert music has made no impression on me (i don't really watch movies so i don't know his film scores) and shostakovich's music is, well. formulaic? idk, i feel that a lot of his compositions consist of re-arranging four or five standard "topics" over and over again in different ways. certainly history's been kind to him, but that's because Shostakovich the composer has become largely intertwined with Shostakovich the anti-communist icon. had he lived in England or Germany rather than the Soviet Union i suspect history would have a rather different assessment (although audiences, i think, wouldn't care much either way).

the cello concertos are nice tho

Quote
As far as Lindberg goes, I found his early music to not be very distinctive. It's just one wash to me. There's no substance or variety in the music. It works completely on a dissonant level, which doesn't necessarily appeal to me. I like composers who can provide relief from the dissonance. Thankfully, for me,  Lindberg's later music has proven to be quite good and contain plenty of melodic ideas that help me access the music. There's still dissonance, but there's plenty of access points that help guide the listener along. For me, Graffiti is one of his better newer compositions. Concerto for Orchestra is also enjoyable. Of his early music, I do like Kraft. I think that's one of his better works from this period.

Anyway, we enjoy what we enjoy and that's all that matters in the end.
indeed. it's interesting that your reactions to Lindberg's earlier and more recent works are practically the mirror image of mine ;P

i don't know Graffiti. people have also told me Al largo is good, and more of a departure from the standard "Lindberg sound". so who knows, might give it a go.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #88 on: January 02, 2013, 10:37:55 AM »
well, i wasn't the one who lumped them together; that was the person who told me to stop composing in "that style" (which apparently to them meant "anything with consonance in it"). all i said was that neither one was a composer i was especially interested in. williams's concert music has made no impression on me (i don't really watch movies so i don't know his film scores) and shostakovich's music is, well. formulaic? idk, i feel that a lot of his compositions consist of re-arranging four or five standard "topics" over and over again in different ways. certainly history's been kind to him, but that's because Shostakovich the composer has become largely intertwined with Shostakovich the anti-communist icon. had he lived in England or Germany rather than the Soviet Union i suspect history would have a rather different assessment (although audiences, i think, wouldn't care much either way).

the cello concertos are nice tho

Well, the history of Shostakovich can't help but to be intertwined with what he composed considering Stalin was breathing down his neck for what 30 years? He's my absolute favorite composer, so my opinion may be a little biased. ;) If hypothetically, Shostakovich lived in England or Germany, he would have become a much more experimental composer I imagine which his early music points to this direction, but the fact that he had to reinvent his style almost overnight to please the Soviet authorities, while retaining an original compositional voice, is, quite frankly, astonishing. Regardless of what your friend says and what he continues to tell you, he was a remarkable composer and is acknowledged as one by scholars, critics, musicians, and listeners around the world.

FYI, I don't think much of the Cello Concertos. :)


indeed. it's interesting that your reactions to Lindberg's earlier and more recent works are practically the mirror image of mine ;P

i don't know Graffiti. people have also told me Al largo is good, and more of a departure from the standard "Lindberg sound". so who knows, might give it a go.

Lindberg isn't a composer I listen to a lot of these days, but, again, Graffiti and the Violin Concerto have remained works that I play more than any others.
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Offline CRCulver

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #89 on: January 19, 2013, 12:24:11 AM »
Now on Dacapo's release schedule is a collection of Lindberg orchestral works. Alan Gilbert leads the NY Philharmonic, and from the presence of soloist Yefim Bronfman, it's clear that one of the pieces will be Lindberg's Piano Concerto No. 2.

It's strange that this is appearing on Dacapo, as Lindberg is not Danish. There is however a preexisting relationship between the NY Philharmonic under Gilbert and Dacapo, as they are recording the Nielsen symphonies. If Dacapo is looking to become a more general Nordic label, I wonder if this means Ondine is pretty much finished (their release schedule has been decimated).

Offline lescamil

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #90 on: January 27, 2013, 11:15:09 PM »
Just listened to the world premiere of what I think is Magnus Lindberg's newest orchestral work, Era, written in 2012 for the 125th anniversary of the Concertgebouw, orchestra and concert hall together. A very enjoyable work with lots of moods, and some stuff that I haven't heard in him before, including some quasi-jazzy moments. However, the work is unmistakeable Lindberg, and those of us that know his recent works know what to expect for the most part.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #91 on: April 26, 2013, 06:54:15 PM »
Coming soon! Finally!

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Offline lescamil

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #92 on: April 26, 2013, 09:13:05 PM »
I've heard all three of those works and I can say that this new, most recent Lindberg is decent, but not anywhere near his greatest works of the 90s like the first Piano Concerto, Feria, etc. EXPO is a vapid, empty concert-raiser that is easily forgotten after you hear it. The Piano Concerto No. 2 is a great work that reminds me quite a bit of Salonen's Piano Concerto, which should be no coincidence since both were written for Yefim Bronfman, only it doesn't have the awkward piano writing of the Salonen, since Lindberg himself is a great pianist. In the cadenza at the end are some some not-so-obvious but hilarious indirect quotations from a few famous piano concertos. Al Largo is a great work, but perhaps a bit too long. It reminds me of the Concerto for Orchestra a bit. Too bad the Souvenir in Memoriam Gérard Grisey didn't make it on the disk. That is perhaps Lindberg's best work from the past 5 years.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #93 on: April 27, 2013, 06:55:53 AM »
I've heard all three of those works and I can say that this new, most recent Lindberg is decent, but not anywhere near his greatest works of the 90s like the first Piano Concerto, Feria, etc. EXPO is a vapid, empty concert-raiser that is easily forgotten after you hear it. The Piano Concerto No. 2 is a great work that reminds me quite a bit of Salonen's Piano Concerto, which should be no coincidence since both were written for Yefim Bronfman, only it doesn't have the awkward piano writing of the Salonen, since Lindberg himself is a great pianist. In the cadenza at the end are some some not-so-obvious but hilarious indirect quotations from a few famous piano concertos. Al Largo is a great work, but perhaps a bit too long. It reminds me of the Concerto for Orchestra a bit. Too bad the Souvenir in Memoriam Gérard Grisey didn't make it on the disk. That is perhaps Lindberg's best work from the past 5 years.

Considering I'm not fond of 90s Lindberg, this should be right up my alley. :) I like the new direction Lindberg has gone in while some others apparently don't. I do need to revisit the early works, but I generally found them unmemorable with Kraft being perhaps the best written of them all.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2013, 06:57:26 AM by Mirror Image »
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Offline edward

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #94 on: August 24, 2013, 07:06:18 AM »
Just as a quick heads up re: lescamil's comment about Souvenir in memoriam Gerard Grisey, this disc comes out next week:



Nice to see a second recording of a new violin concerto, and this coupling is more useful than Batiashvili's.

I'll assume that Jubilees is related to the piano work of the same name.
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Offline lescamil

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #95 on: August 24, 2013, 10:05:40 AM »
Jubilees is basically an orchestrated version of the piano work by the same name. There isn't much musical elaboration, and the timings of the pieces are similar. Still, I'm excited to get Souvenir on disk, finally. All we need is a recording of Era and the Aldeburgh Trio (Bubo Bubo, Counter Phrases, and Red House). Red House and Souvenir are perhaps my favorite pieces by Lindberg that he has composed in the past 10 years. Perhaps it's no coincidence that these pieces are for chamber ensemble, not full orchestra?
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #96 on: August 24, 2013, 05:22:05 PM »
Nice to see a second recording of a new violin concerto, and this coupling is more useful than Batiashvili's.

This may very well be the case but will the performance be as magnificent as Bastiashvili's? That's yet to be determined. Plus, her recording can be bought for next to nothing.
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Offline snyprrr

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair!! EMERGENCY!! Re-Eval
« Reply #97 on: April 13, 2014, 01:59:55 PM »
LIGHTNING ROUND!!

The rabbit trail led to Lindberg today (how diiid that happen?) and, since I noticed there hasn't been any new news, I thought that an Emergency Re-Evaluation was in order. What Is the Most Essential Lindberg?

1) Sony w/Cello Concerto

2) Sony w/Violin Concerto

3) Clarinet Cto. (Ondine)

4) Piano Cto./KRAFT (Ondine)

5) Finlandia 2-cd

6) Ondine Box

7) Ondine 1 Marea/Kinetics/Joy... I had this once and let it go. Maybe I'm like MI and just didn't respond?

8) Ondine 2... I remember being disappointed when this came out

9) Ondine 3... I remember being disappointed when this came out

10) Ondine 4

11) Ondine 5

12) Ondine 6

13) DG Engine/Aura... I remember being disappointed when this came out

14) Eotvos... Corrente/Ur/Dup Concertante/Joy


I'm pretty sure that's it (except for the PC 2 disc which I'm not interested in). What happened to Lindberg in my heart? He was... then he isn't... now he looks like Skellan Skasgaard?... what's going on? One work. Maybe two. I just don't even want to bother, wtf?
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Offline CRCulver

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Re: Magnus Lindberg's lair
« Reply #98 on: April 27, 2014, 06:31:12 PM »
Lindberg is now composer-in-residence with the London Philharmonic. A concert in January 2015 will be the world premiere of a work he has written for soprano and orchestra. This should be interesting, as Lindberg has paid almost no attention to voices in his almost 4-decade career.

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