Cool Coffee Machines - Click to see details on Amazon. All sales from these links support your forum.

Author Topic: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music  (Read 9042 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online The new erato

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 12726
Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
« Reply #80 on: January 09, 2016, 02:42:21 AM »
Strictly speaking, his first oratorios would be the two italian pieces "La Resurrezione" and "Trionfo del tempo ed il disinganno" written when Handel was in his early 20s in Italy.

They are both fantastic pieces but rather different from the later English oratorios: Very "Italian", that is brilliant, virtuoso solo singing (also some virtuoso passages for instruments, the short sinfonia from the "Trionfo" was probably one of the first pieces with a concertante keyboard (organ) ever), hardly any choral passages.
As a longsuffering Handelian I prefer him in an Italian mode, and those two you mention are my favorite Handel oratorios.

Offline Jo498

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1829
  • Location: Germany
Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
« Reply #81 on: January 09, 2016, 04:53:33 AM »
I think that some of the later more choral-dominated oratorios are deservedly famous, even when the overall dramaturgy might sag sometimes. E.g. "Solomon" does not really have much action to speak of (except the "harlot scene"), but the choruses are simply amazing and it is funny when Handel almost self-ironically lets Solomon give the Queen of Sheba an entertainment with 4? choral pieces each depicting a different affect/mood.

But the early italian pieces certainly deserve to be better known, although there are fortunately pretty good recordings around.
Maybe Handel basically copies the style of Alessandro Scarlatti and other older italian composers (whereas the specific stylistic fusion of the 1730-50s oratorios is his more individual "voice") but they are brilliantly done and lots of fun. And the same is true for the shorter Italian cantatas as well as the Dixit Dominus (and a few other motets/psalm settings from the Italian period).
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Online The new erato

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 12726
Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
« Reply #82 on: January 09, 2016, 05:52:04 AM »
As a longsuffering Handelian I prefer him in an Italian mode, and those two you mention are my favorite Handel oratorios.
When speaking of his Italian mode, I am of course including his operas! Though I very much agree with your latest post.

Buying Music From Amazon?
Please consider using these links. A small percentage of every sale using these links is passed on to GMG and helps keep this forum online.
Amazon US
Amazon Canada
Amazon UK