Author Topic: Tchaikovsky  (Read 62349 times)

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Offline zamyrabyrd

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #380 on: August 27, 2018, 11:09:46 PM »
Valery Gergiev recorded all of the Tchaikovsky Symphonies with the Mariinsky Orchestra, including some shorter works as the Polonaise from Eugene Onegin. Not only the aural quality but the visuals are impressive.
The whole series was on TV some years ago. Luckily there was still an VHS recorder on standby.

https://www.amazon.com/Tchaikovsky-Symphonies-Nos-4-5-6/dp/B005HK8L18
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Offline kyjo

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #381 on: February 21, 2019, 10:11:38 PM »
Just discovered Tchaikovsky’s infrequently-heard “symphonic ballad” The Voyevoda and was quite stunned! A late work, it is possibly the most “modern” in feel of any Tchaikovsky work that I know. It’s orchestration is highly successful and colorful (something that can’t be said for some other works of his IMO), with creative use of percussion, celeste, and harp. It’s even rather proto-Sibelian (!) with its tensely charged opening timpani figure and its overall sense of inevitability. It ends with bone-crushing low brass straight out of the Pathetique and Manfred symphonies. Powerful and really surprising stuff!
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Offline ChamberNut

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #382 on: February 22, 2019, 04:57:02 AM »
Just discovered Tchaikovsky’s infrequently-heard “symphonic ballad” The Voyevoda and was quite stunned! A late work, it is possibly the most “modern” in feel of any Tchaikovsky work that I know. It’s orchestration is highly successful and colorful (something that can’t be said for some other works of his IMO), with creative use of percussion, celeste, and harp. It’s even rather proto-Sibelian (!) with its tensely charged opening timpani figure and its overall sense of inevitability. It ends with bone-crushing low brass straight out of the Pathetique and Manfred symphonies. Powerful and really surprising stuff!

Glad you enjoyed it.  It is a great piece!
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Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #383 on: February 22, 2019, 06:35:54 AM »
Glad you enjoyed it.  It is a great piece!

+1!

Offline Ghost of Baron Scarpia

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #384 on: February 22, 2019, 10:14:10 AM »
'It...preserves a volatile performance of the Tchaikovsky 5th unlike any of Stokowski's three commercial recordings. Here, in front of an enthusiastic Detroit audience, he is swept up in the passion of the moment to a considerable degree.'

I don't doubt the intensity of the performance, but I find it implausible that the performance was the way it was because the conductor was "swept up in the passion of the moment." The conductors influence on a performance is formed during rehearsal, not because of how he waves the baton during the performance. (And it now occurs to me that Stowkowski conducted without a baton.) Expressive effects executed by an ensemble of 100 musicians are calculated, not spontaneous.

I'll admit I tend to interpret displays of 'emotion' by conductors on the podium as phony and manipulative. I saw Bernstein conduct the NY Philharmonic once and all of his jumping up and down on the podium struck me as ridiculous.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2019, 10:27:42 AM by Ghost of Baron Scarpia »
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Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Tchaikovsky
« Reply #385 on: February 22, 2019, 10:32:24 AM »
Just discovered Tchaikovsky’s infrequently-heard “symphonic ballad” The Voyevoda and was quite stunned! A late work, it is possibly the most “modern” in feel of any Tchaikovsky work that I know. It’s orchestration is highly successful and colorful (something that can’t be said for some other works of his IMO), with creative use of percussion, celeste, and harp. It’s even rather proto-Sibelian (!) with its tensely charged opening timpani figure and its overall sense of inevitability. It ends with bone-crushing low brass straight out of the Pathetique and Manfred symphonies. Powerful and really surprising stuff!
Glad you enjoyed it.  It is a great piece!

Indeed it is! I was surprised and delighted when I first heard it too. I have Inbal and Petrenko in it now, I'd take either of them.  :)

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