Author Topic: Shostakovich's Trio op 67  (Read 3644 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline CJB

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
Shostakovich's Trio op 67
« on: October 25, 2007, 05:29:47 PM »
I've been listening to Shostakovich's Trio 0p 67 & Sonata for Cello & piano -- Isaac Stern, yo Yo Ma & Emanuel Ax (on Sony) ---  I've never hard music like it -- it gets right inside you, particularly the Trio op 67. Did he compose anything else like this? What should I listen to?

btpaul674

  • Guest
Re: Shostakovich's Trio op 67
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2007, 07:47:10 PM »
I know I'm not one to make recommendations for Shostakovich, but I am playing op. 67 at school currently. The first movement's piano part reminds me of one of the parts from one of his ballet suites... but I don't know which one; I'll let you know.

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5981
  • Posts: who's counting?
  • Currently Listening to:
    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: Shostakovich's Trio op 67
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2007, 08:10:21 PM »
Try his 14th string quartet.

It'll knock you about...



Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline mr_espansiva

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 32
Re: Shostakovich's Trio op 67
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2007, 03:07:20 AM »
Can't go wrong with the Piano Quintet - see if you can find Ashkenazy/Fitzwilliam Qt on Decca - amazing stuff!
Espansiva - the Inextinguishable desire for chocolate.

Offline PaulR

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2489
Re: Shostakovich's Trio op 67
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2007, 02:07:37 PM »
you might like his other Sonatas, violin And Viola (The viola sonata was his last work).  I haven't really listened to the Piano Sonatas, so I can't give you an informed opinion on it. 

Also, try his String Quartets.  I have Fitzwilliam String Quartet, and Emerson String quartet sets.  I really like the Emerson version. :)

Hope this helps you out :)

Offline some guy

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2070
  • Location: Somewhere else
  • Currently Listening to:
    Music
Re: Shostakovich's Trio op 67
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2007, 02:38:31 PM »
Also try to get the first Beaux Arts trio recording of this, done while Shostakovich was still alive, I think.

Their later one is full of the same hushed, timid awe that all the other ones I've heard fall into: the "Oh my God, we're playing a great, profound masterpiece here, we'd better be reverent" trap.

The only recent recording I know that avoids that is the Eroica Trios scrappy recording, I believe it was their first disc.

The above is worth exactly two cents, too. I just checked.

Offline quintett op.57

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 465
Re: Shostakovich's Trio op 67
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2007, 10:46:17 AM »
I suggest hearing it live, it's fabulous, at least with the Wanderer Trio.

To hear something of this kind, you should listen to some of the quartets.
Obviously, I love his quintet op.57, but It's a different kind of work in my opinion

Online vandermolen

  • Silver Subscriber
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 14518
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Shostakovich's Trio op 67
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2007, 01:50:20 PM »
I agree that the Piano Quintet is a logical follow on if you enjoy the Trio. I think that the Piano Quintet is one of Shostakovich's greatest works.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Guido

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3326
  • 396 CCs
Re: Shostakovich's Trio op 67
« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2007, 05:28:21 PM »
Yes to the piano quintet. I would probably not suggest the violin and viola sonatas which are pretty hard going compared to these two more youthful works. The piano trio is an undisputed classic of the chamber repertoire, and the cello sonata is also standard literature for cellists. I love both works, but I've always thought that the first movement of the cello sonata outshone the subsequent ones.
Geologist.

The large print giveth, and the small print taketh away

George

  • Guest
Re: Shostakovich's Trio op 67
« Reply #9 on: October 28, 2007, 05:43:02 PM »
Also try to get the first Beaux Arts trio recording of this, done while Shostakovich was still alive, I think.


Could you give me the year and label on that one?

I have the 1974 Philips version and I love it.

Offline some guy

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2070
  • Location: Somewhere else
  • Currently Listening to:
    Music
Re: Shostakovich's Trio op 67
« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2007, 07:20:41 PM »
I have the 1974 Philips version and I love it.

That's the one, George. It's as close to perfect as is possible to imagine!

George

  • Guest
Re: Shostakovich's Trio op 67
« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2007, 07:35:14 PM »
That's the one, George. It's as close to perfect as is possible to imagine!

Agreed.  8)


snyprrr

  • Guest
uintet
« Reply #13 on: April 05, 2010, 05:00:04 AM »
Also try to get the first Beaux Arts trio recording of this, done while Shostakovich was still alive, I think.

Their later one is full of the same hushed, timid awe that all the other ones I've heard fall into: the "Oh my God, we're playing a great, profound masterpiece here, we'd better be reverent" trap.

The only recent recording I know that avoids that is the Eroica Trios scrappy recording, I believe it was their first disc.

The above is worth exactly two cents, too. I just checked.

Seconded.

Also, I have the Erato disc with Mintz playing the Violin & Viola Sonatas. THAT's the stuff right there! Can I get a witness? These pieces aren't as folksy as the Trio or Quintet, but they are beautiful meditations upon death, 30mins a piece.