Author Topic: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)  (Read 359715 times)

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Offline Brian

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5100 on: August 14, 2017, 07:12:33 PM »
Just bought tickets to Daniil Trifonov's recital in San Francisco on October 20th!

Mompou :Variaciones sobre un tema di Chopin
Tchaikovsky: Un poco di Chopin, Opus 72, no.15
Rachmaninoff: Variations on a Theme of Chopin, Opus 22

Chopin: Selected Mazurkas
Chopin: Piano Sonata No. 2

ooooooooooooohhh

So jealous.

Offline Jeffrey Smith

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5101 on: August 14, 2017, 07:40:13 PM »
My next Ravinia date is this Thursday - indoors this time:

The Knights
Susan Graham
, Mezzo-soprano

Purcell:   Fantasia Upon One Note
John Adams:   Common Tones in Simple Time
Canteloube:   Selections from Chants d’Auvergne
John Adams:   Chamber Symphony
Mozart:   Symphony No. 40

The Knights are new to me - apparently a "hip" (not HIP) NY-based chamber orchestra that likes to balance old and new music. Anyway, the programming sure is interesting.
I have one of their recordings. I think your expectations will be met

Offline arpeggio

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Stauton Music Festival 2017
« Reply #5102 on: August 15, 2017, 02:28:47 PM »
My wife and I are leaving to attend the Staunton Music Festival tomorrow.

The festival is in Staunton, Virginia, the birthplace of Woodrow Wilson.

Offline jessop

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5103 on: August 15, 2017, 03:21:51 PM »
My wife and I are leaving to attend the Staunton Music Festival tomorrow.

The festival is in Staunton, Virginia, the birthplace of Woodrow Wilson.

I hope you have a great time. What's being performed? :)

Offline arpeggio

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5104 on: August 15, 2017, 05:02:47 PM »
A little bit of everything from performances on period instruments to contemporary avant-garde.

Link to website: http://stauntonmusicfestival.org/

Offline pjme

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5105 on: August 17, 2017, 11:04:36 PM »
Next week: Laus Polyphoniae in Antwerp.

This year:

The 24th edition of Laus Polyphoniae explores the unique world of adoration. Worshipping God, venerating the saints and paying homage  to the Virgin Mary are intrinsic aspects of the Catholic religion.  However adoration can also have a secular meaning, when two lovers worship and adore each other.

In the Middle Ages and Renaissance, adoration was a great source of inspiration for artists. They transformed their worship and veneration  into unforgettable words, images and sounds. This led to prayers to saints and martyrs, poetry expressing one’s intimate feelings for a lover – often an unattainable object of adoration – paintings as signs of devotion to the Virgin Mary, and of course magnificent pieces of music by composers both famous and unknown.

Explore the fascinating aspects of adoration this summer at dozens of concerts. Listen to music from different religious traditions in honour of  God, saints and relics. Compositions in adoration of the Virgin Mary are typical of the Low Countries. Passionate love songs and madrigals will take you to Southern Europe. And, last but certainly not least, discover a symbiosis of religious and secular adoration in the concerts dedicated to the Song of Songs.


I'm especially drawn to this concert of Vox luminis, next Thursday:

Vox Luminis, now an established international name in the world of early music, has immersed itself in the German music of Luthers time and the period that followed, with works by composers including Heinrich Scheidemann, Michael Altenburg, Andreas Hammerschmidt, Paul Siefert, Michael Praetorius, Samuel Scheidt and Thomas Selle. The concert is constructed to reflect the Protestant ecclesiastical calendar, and includes the famous melody Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott: A Mighty Fortress Is Our God.

https://www.voxluminis.com/


P.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2017, 12:27:56 AM by pjme »

Offline king ubu

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5106 on: August 21, 2017, 01:23:41 AM »
Symphony Concert 9
Orchestra of the LUCERNE FESTIVAL ACADEMY | Heinz Holliger | Patricia Kopatchinskaja
Debussy | Koechlin | Holliger


SUN, 20.08. | 10.30 | Nr. 17315
KKL Luzern, Concert Hall

Orchestra of the LUCERNE FESTIVAL ACADEMY   
Heinz Holliger  conductor
Patricia Kopatchinskaja  violin

Claude Debussy (1862–1918)
Khamma (orchestrated by Charles Koechlin)
Charles Koechlin (1867–1950)
Les Bandar-log (Scherzo des singes), Op. 176
Heinz Holliger (*1939)
Violin Concerto Hommage ŕ Louis Soutter

https://www.lucernefestival.ch/en/program/orchestra-of-the-lucerne-festival-academy-heinz-holliger-patricia-kopatchinskaja/417

------

Identities 3
Camerata Zürich | Thomas Demenga | Thomas Sarbacher
Suk | Dvořák | Janáček


SUN, 20.08. | 16.00 | Nr. 17316
Kirchensaal MaiHof

Josef Suk (1874–1935)
Meditation on the Old Czech Chorale “St. Wenceslas,” Op. 35a
Antonín Dvořák (1841–1904)
Silent Woods, Op. 68, no. 5
Rondo in G minor for Cello and Orchestra, Op. 94
Slavonic Dance in G minor, Op. 46, no. 8 (arranged for cello and orchestra)
Leoš Janáček (1854–1928)
On an Overgrown Path
arranged for string orchestra by Daniel Rumler
performance with texts by Maďa Brami 

https://www.lucernefestival.ch/en/program/camerata-zurich-thomas-demenga-thomas-sarbacher/451

So I spent my very first day at the oh so posh Lucerne Festival yesterday ... and guess what? It's mostly not so very posh, at least not beyond what you usually get when you attend classical concerts. Either way, the first concert with the Lucerne Festival Academy Orchestra cond. Heinz Holliger, was plain amazing. I had a seat on the upper gallery (first one, second/third wasn't on sale for that concert and that was good since like this it was almost sold out) on the height of the conductor and could ogle down into the orchestra (I love doing that) - and the phantastic thing at the big hall of KKL is that you get perfect sound even in such a seat. Heinz Holliger certainly is no charismatic dictuctor, but he made the music come alive with the rather large orchestra of the academy, which played excellently at that. Never heard "Khamma" yet, and never heard any Koechlin live (I've got lots of the Hänssler discs stacked up for discovery ... the orchestral I've got there is all Holliger, too), and it was indeed great! But the big attraction was Holliger's own violin concerto, expertly conducted and intensely played by the one and only Patricia Kopatchinskaja. I had pre-listened (for the first time) to the Zehetmair/Holliger recording on ECM, read Holliger's evocative notes on Louis Soutter and more - and I guess I'm really in sync with him about those "beiseit" artists (most obviously in the case of Robert Walser) - will take this as motivation to really check out Soutter, who's present with a painting here and there in Swiss museums, but I never really got into his oeuvre so far.

Then, to bridge the time, my plan was to visit the Kunstmuseum Lucerne, which is located on the top floor of the KKL building. Nothing much too exciting in their collection that is currently on display, but a few nice ones still (including a pair by Hodler, alas the one Valloton still mentioned in the guide was part of a previous set), and then a pretty interesting confrontation of 19c landscape paintings by Robert Zünd (paintings that make Switzerland look the way I kinda had "ideal Switzerland" in my head as a kid ... that type of imagery was still around in the 80s, in children's books etc - I guess when I painted rural scenes as a kid, it was that stuff I had in mind, without being able to tell where I got to know it from exactly) and large-format photographs by Tobias Madörin - and for those photos alone the visit was wortwhile (though the ticket was darn expensive I found). The photographs are made with a large format analogue camera and offer an amazing wealth of details and in many cases the most incredible light and shade effects - they indeed in some cases appear to be paintings until you get really close to check out details.

At 2 p.m., inside the museum, there was one more bit of the Lucerne Festival: a "Dekoloration" of Koechlin's "Les Bandar-log" by artist/performer Strotter Inst. (Inst.rument and Inst.allation, that is, and as for "strotter", here's the relevant bit from his website: "The „Strotter“ in the decade before World War II were fishing in the canalisation for stocked fat to sell it to soapcompanies. As they were standing on the edge of society today Strotter Inst. stands on the edge of art and music, working with stuff thrown away by others."). He took the Koechlin apart and pieced it together again with loops and stuff - quite fascinating indeed, though with my rather superficial knowledge of both Koechlin and DJ culture, the concept did not actually materialize much in the music itself (not that it mattered, I enjoyed the performance a lot as it was).
Some more about it: https://www.kunstmuseumluzern.ch/en/ausstellungen/soundzz/

When I went down from the musuem to have a little snack at the nice self service restaurant inside KKL, and taking my stuff to sit outside, I passed Holliger and had the chance to quickly tell him how much I had enjoyed the concert. Having finished, I left only to see Kopatchinskaja arrive (they were waiting for her and went over to the railway station together to catch the train back home ... so much for stars and all that b-s) - and of course I had to quickly say thanks to her as well - it was really tremendous, and sound in the hall is amazing (this was only my second classical concert in there, up to that I'd seen half a dozen jazz concerts and for that, the hall is far from great - but then that has to do with very few jazz players nowadays being able to play without amplification, too - lamentable).

Then, I took a stroll through the historic centre of Lucerne, together with a few thousand tourists (though they're really glued to the Kapellbrücke, the replica of the wooden bridge that burnt down a few years ago), quickly went into the Jesuit church, which is indeed pretty interesting (and I'd never been into it before of course - you don't often visit sights in your neighbourhood, do you?), and then walked out to the MaiHof, a church complex whose main hall is used for concerts and hots some Lucerne Festival events, too.

Camerata Zurich led by concertmaster Igor Karsko opened with Suk's mediation on the St Wenzel's chorale Op. 35a, a bohemian nationalist sentimental piece that kind of provided the tone of the entire concert. Thomas Demenga then joined in for the three pieces by Dvorák, "Silent Woods", the Rondo in g minor, and one of the slavonic dances (in his own arrangement) - the old ladies in the row in front of me started nodding their heads and stomping their feet ... guess this is their rock'n'roll - as far as rebellion went ... either way, I found it all a bit too pleasing and too easy, but performed with gusto, no question about that. Then, the main attraction, with Thomas Sarbacher, a German actor who made Zurich his base a while ago, speaking texts written by French author Maďa Brami (the programme fails to mention who did the translations - lousy), and those texts, while delivered with panache, were the main issue I had, while Daniel Rumler's arrangement of the pieces for string orchestra were quite nice indeed. The texts relate to old Janáček's love for a wonderful rose (yup, I guess it was supposed to be kind of a fairy tale) and relate the episode (not sure it's actually confirmed by any source?) of her (that is Kamila Stösslová, 37 years his junior) son Otto being lost in the woods, and Janáček being haunted by memories of his daugher Olga who died young, while trying to find said Otto, and doing so possibly (so that story goes) catching the pneumonia that ended his life then ... the texts - commissioned by Demenga who is the artistic director of Camerata Zurich - were pretty straight I found - not laconic and naive enough to achieve a fairy tale effect, nor were they cryptic enough to stand on their own. So the attempt to concretise the story behind Janáček's music was, in my eyes, a big loss for that music. I guess if you wrote some Celan type of obscure and to-the-point lines to it, it might work just fine, but like that it was just more "playing it to the people". And that, alas, was the main impression I got from this concert. Fair enough, as the Camerata is one of the many larger ensembles playing the Zurich market and has to create and fill its own niche to survive, but from this impression, that niche isn't really one I belong in.


next up - and I'm most excited (Hana Blažiková  :-* ):

Symphony Concert 11 – Monteverdi
English Baroque Soloists | Monteverdi Choir | Sir John Eliot Gardiner | soloists
Monteverdi


TUE, 22.08. | 19.30 | Nr. 17321
KKL Luzern, Concert Hall

English Baroque Soloists   
Monteverdi Choir   
Sir John Eliot Gardiner  conductor and staging
Elsa Rooke  director
Krystian Adam  Orfeo
Hana Blažiková  La Musica, Euridice
Kangmin Justin Kim  Speranza
Anna Dennis  Ninfa
Lucile Richardot  Messaggiera
Francesca Boncompagni  Proserpina
Gianluca Buratto  Caronte, Plutone
Furio Zanasi  Apollo
and additional soloists   

Claudio Monteverdi (1567–1643)
L’Orfeo
Favola in musica in a prologue and five acts

https://www.lucernefestival.ch/en/program/english-baroque-soloists-monteverdi-choir-sir-john-eliot-gardiner-soloists/419
Es wollt ein meydlein grasen gan:
Fick mich, lieber Peter!
Und do die roten röslein stan:
Fick mich, lieber Peter!
Fick mich mehr, du hast dein ehr.
Kannstu nit, ich wills dich lern.
Fick mich, lieber Peter!

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Offline Spineur

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5107 on: August 21, 2017, 02:20:31 AM »
Just got tickets for Debussy's Pelleas et Melissande at the Paris Opera in the mythical and poetic staging of Robert Wilson

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/F0OB_wMt658" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/F0OB_wMt658</a>

Pretty excited to see this !!
« Last Edit: August 21, 2017, 02:22:18 AM by Spineur »
A woman voice glides like the wind
Of black, of damp, of night
And all it touches in this flight
Suddenly is over.

Anna Akhomatova

Offline king ubu

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5108 on: August 21, 2017, 03:49:47 AM »
Just got tickets for Debussy's Pelleas et Melissande at the Paris Opera in the mythical and poetic staging of Robert Wilson

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/F0OB_wMt658" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/F0OB_wMt658</a>

Pretty excited to see this !!

Congrats! Would be exited, too! Saw a fantastic production in Zurich last year - easily one of my greatest opera experiences so far!
Es wollt ein meydlein grasen gan:
Fick mich, lieber Peter!
Und do die roten röslein stan:
Fick mich, lieber Peter!
Fick mich mehr, du hast dein ehr.
Kannstu nit, ich wills dich lern.
Fick mich, lieber Peter!

http://ubus-notizen.blogspot.ch/

Offline pjme

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5109 on: August 22, 2017, 11:46:03 PM »
I went to Antwerp's Sint Jacobs yesterday, for a concert by "Vox luminis" .

The grandeur of the monumental building (it houses P.P. Rubens' grave) added to the basically tranquil atmosphere.

Lionel Meunier and his superb singers presented a program exploring Lutheran repertoire.
Some names were familiar ( Hammerschmidt, Praetorius, Schütz), others were completely new to me: Christoph Bernhard, Joachim a Burck, Caspar Othmayr, Thomas Selle.

I was deeply impressed by the wide stylistic diversity - from more archaic polyphony to Italianate polychorality and madrigal-like features. Thomas Selles "Veni sancte spiritus" was an overwhelmingly glorious example and Sint Jacob suddenly became San Marco.

Schütz' "Selig sind die Toten" brought the evening to a moving end.





<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/g6dJkbQUiLk" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/g6dJkbQUiLk</a>

« Last Edit: August 23, 2017, 12:16:01 AM by pjme »

Offline king ubu

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5110 on: August 23, 2017, 12:38:03 AM »
If Rubens' paintings are an indication he must have been at least 25 ft tall, so there better be grandeur where they buried him  ::)
Es wollt ein meydlein grasen gan:
Fick mich, lieber Peter!
Und do die roten röslein stan:
Fick mich, lieber Peter!
Fick mich mehr, du hast dein ehr.
Kannstu nit, ich wills dich lern.
Fick mich, lieber Peter!

http://ubus-notizen.blogspot.ch/

Offline NikF

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5111 on: August 27, 2017, 09:41:03 AM »
John Adams: Shaker Loops.
Shostakovich (Arr. Barshai): String Quartet No. 8 arranged for String Orchestra.
Andre Previn: Nonet.

I thought I'd already made purchases for all the Sunday afternoon chamber series performances by the RSNO that I want to attend this season, but after discussion I've now bought tickets for this one too.
I know the Adams piece and have seen it danced at the ballet. There's not much Shostakovich I can think of that I won't like to hear in concert. The Previn is completely unknown to me, but I usually welcome the opportunity to hear something that's new to my ears, especially when it's a live performance. Finally, I'll be there with someone who is a musician and charming.  8)

Offline Todd

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5112 on: August 28, 2017, 05:58:44 AM »
I ordered my tickets for Yuja Wang's performance next May.  Tickets are already going fast.
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5113 on: August 28, 2017, 09:54:15 PM »
I really enjoyed seeing the Cincinnati SO two nights ago in London (Bernstein, Copland and Tchaikovsky) and am looking forward to Shostakovich's Symphony 11 at the Proms on 6th September.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Archaic Torso of Apollo

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5114 on: September 07, 2017, 11:20:26 AM »
This is coming up in a couple weeks. Not planning to go, just wanted to point out a certain oddity here:

Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Riccardo Muti, conductor
Anne-Sophie Mutter, violinist
Penderecki: The Awakening of Jacob
Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto
Schumann: Symphony No. 2

Yeah, Muti of all people conducts Penderecki. The Awakening [or Dream] of Jacob is a little gem of a piece, which achieved some notoriety when it was used in the "Room 237" scene of The Shining. However, for me it's not worth the trek and the price to hear Muti conduct 10 minutes of Penderecki in the company of two warhorses.
formerly VELIMIR (before that, Spitvalve)

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Offline Florestan

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5115 on: September 07, 2017, 12:16:04 PM »
Tomorrow night:

Enescu Festival 2017, Bucharest

Grand Palace Hall

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Conductor: MANFRED HONECK
Soloist: ANNE-SOPHIE MUTTER – violin

 
Programme:

Enescu – Concert Overture on Popular Romanian Themes in A Major op. 32
Dvořák – Concerto for violin and orchestra in a minor op. 53
Mahler – Symphony no. 1 in D major

Will report.
Music expresses that which cannot be said and on which it is impossible to be silent.Victor Hugo

Offline André

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5116 on: September 08, 2017, 09:40:39 AM »
Heard yesterday: Orchestre métropolitain de Montréal in Bruckner's 5th symphony, and Strauss' Burleske, played by Angela Cheng. Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducted.

Very well-played and soundly conceived Bruckner. The problem is that the symphony was taped for commercial release on ATMA. As is too often the case, both orchestra and conductor play the work safe to make sure no mistakes make their way in the final product. A degree of tension and daring is thus left aside. Orchestral playing and conducting by consensus: unimpeachable, but ultimately unmemorable.

The Strauss (an agreeable but minor work) was more lively, indeed quite excellent. It was not recorded.

Offline Florestan

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5117 on: September 09, 2017, 08:01:05 AM »
Enescu Festival 2017, Bucharest

Grand Palace Hall

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Conductor: MANFRED HONECK
Soloist: ANNE-SOPHIE MUTTER – violin

Will report.

As promised, here's my review.

Quote
Enescu – Concert Overture on Popular Romanian Themes in A Major op. 32

First listen.

The title is misleading. I was expecting a folkloric romp in the vein of the First Romanian Rhapsody and I was hugely disappointed absolutely taken by surprise. It starts indeed as in the middle of a peasantly merriment, then it turns into an ethereal, poetic, nocturnal idyll magically preluded and punctuated by nightingales and blackbirds, and then all is quiet and sleepy for a while --- and suddenly, boom and bang, lo and behold!, the history marches on and the only things it has in stock for Romanian peasants and lovers is bad omens and forebodings... and the whole thing ends unambiguously bleak.

And no wonder about it: the 1st Romanian Rhapsody is from 1901, the heydays of the Kingdom of Romania; the Concert Overture is from 1948, the first year of the Communist Republic.

A masterpiece, but one of whose full relevance is lost on non-Romanian listeners, I'm afraid.

Quote
Dvořák – Concerto for violin and orchestra in a minor op. 53

Anne-Sophie Mutter is a glamorous diva who is all about showwomanship, pyrotechnics and domineering, right?

Wrong! She played in a poised, unassuming, intimate and inward-looking manner. The Allegro ma non troppo was exactly that, a fine mixture of energy and tenderness. The Adagio ma non troppo was to die for, a miracle of poetry and lyricism, with just the right dose of disturbance, while the giocoso in the final Allegro was perfectly balanced by a sentimental nostalgia particularly appealing to my romantic self.

Pure bliss.

Now, an encore by Anne-Sophie Mutter is either a flashy Paganini Capriccio or an over-Romanticized Kreisler miniature, right?

Wrong again! A tender, half-ruminating half-floating Bach gavotte capped off a memorable performance of Ms. Mutter.

Hands down the best violinist I've ever heard live.

Quote
Mahler – Symphony no. 1 in D major

I'll be short and state it bluntly: of all the three M1s I've ever heard live, this was by far the best. (The other two have been Horia Andreescu / Romanian NRSO a few years ago, and Zubin Mehta / Israel PO two years ago also during the Enescu Festival).

Suffice it to say that, when the eight hornists stood up for the final apotheosis I almost stood up with them...

The most interesting thing for me, though, was to watch the reaction of nearby people who were obviously not familiar with Mahler: awe, jaw-dropping and utmost excitement --- reenforcing my firm conviction that Mahler is best experienced live.

After some long standign ovations, Mr. Honeck came back on stage and started conducting...

... a Joseph Lanner Ländler, which sounded just about right, underscoring one of the main influences on Mahler,  popular, even vulgar, Vienna.

More standing ovations followed, and just when my wife was whispering to my right ear "That's it, it's over!", Mr. Honeck came back on stage and started conducting...

...a Brahms Hungarian Dance.

Thus capping off the best, most exhilarating Enescu Festival concert I've ever attended.
Music expresses that which cannot be said and on which it is impossible to be silent.Victor Hugo

Offline North Star

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5118 on: September 09, 2017, 08:18:40 AM »
As promised, here's my review.

First listen.

The title is misleading. I was expecting a folkloric romp in the vein of the First Romanian Rhapsody and I was hugely disappointed absolutely taken by surprise. It starts indeed as in the middle of a peasantly merriment, then it turns into an ethereal, poetic, nocturnal idyll magically preluded and punctuated by nightingales and blackbirds, and then all is quiet and sleepy for a while --- and suddenly, boom and bang, lo and behold!, the history marches on and the only things it has in stock for Romanian peasants and lovers is bad omens and forebodings... and the whole thing ends unambiguously bleak.

And no wonder about it: the 1st Romanian Rhapsody is from 1901, the heydays of the Kingdom of Romania; the Concert Overture is from 1948, the first year of the Communist Republic.

A masterpiece, but one of whose full relevance is lost on non-Romanian listeners, I'm afraid.
Coincidentally I listened to this work, also for the first time, quite recently. I must say I didn't think of the dates or what was happening in the world, but enjoyed it enormously regardless. Enescu's music ought to be much better known than it is.

Quote
Anne-Sophie Mutter is a glamorous diva who is all about showwomanship, pyrotechnics and domineering, right?

Wrong! She played in a poised, unassuming, intimate and inward-looking manner. The Allegro ma non troppo was exactly that, a fine mixture of energy and tenderness. The Adagio ma non troppo was to die for, a miracle of poetry and lyricism, with just the right dose of disturbance, while the giocoso in the final Allegro was perfectly balanced by a sentimental nostalgia particularly appealing to my romantic self.

Pure bliss.

Now, an encore by Anne-Sophie Mutter is either a flashy Paganini Capriccio or an over-Romanticized Kreisler miniature, right?

Wrong again! A tender, half-ruminating half-floating Bach gavotte capped off a memorable performance of Ms. Mutter.

Hands down the best violinist I've ever heard live.
Hearing Mutter play some Mozart concertos and a Rihm work a few years ago with a pickup band of Berliner Phil & Wiener Phil musicians was quite wonderful, too.  8)

Quote
reenforcing my firm conviction that Mahler is best experienced live.
I'll definitely agree with that. All in all, that sounds like quite a concert, Andrei!
"Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it." - Confucius

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Offline Florestan

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5119 on: September 09, 2017, 08:29:34 AM »
Enescu's music ought to be much better known than it is.

First and foremost by me.  ;D

Quote
All in all, that sounds like quite a concert, Andrei!

It certainly was!

My best indicator is my wife: she can't tell Beethoven from Bartok or Boccherini from Brahms but everytime she tells me "This was great, I want more!" I agree 1000%.  :laugh:
Music expresses that which cannot be said and on which it is impossible to be silent.Victor Hugo

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