Author Topic: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)  (Read 426921 times)

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Offline ritter

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5280 on: February 07, 2018, 01:34:48 AM »
Grrrr just bought tickets to Meistersinger and it is bloody expensive
Great you'll get to see Meistersinger live, jessop! It's not that often one gets the chance. As for the price, if you consider the quality and the sheer quantity of the music  (5 hours of glory!), it really won't have been that expensive.. .  ;) :)
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ComposerOfAvantGarde

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5281 on: February 07, 2018, 01:52:45 AM »
That was wonderful last night! Schumann's Op. 52 proved a really nice opener for the main act. The orchestra loves playing with Norrington (he was their principal conductor from 2011 to 2016) and he loves working with them, quite obviously. His conducting at times was just a few gestures to shape the performance, they're a chamber orchestra and know how to play together without any conductor after all ... I understand they're fully using modern instruments, but in direct comparison, they seem a much livelier bunch than the Basler Kammerorchester to me (and I'm considering catching they're C.P.E. Bach/Amadée programme w/Bezuidenhout, albeit it's the night before I'm leaving for a short jazz festival in March ... Bezuidenhout will play Wq 20/H. 423 and KV 271 "Jeunehomme", the orchestra will also play J.C. Bach's symphony Op. 3 No. 6 and C.P.E. Bach's symphony Wq 183 no. 3/H. 665 - no conductor then).

Faust was terrific in the Schumann, and again she has played with ZKO many times and they (and Norrington) were fully in sync, which was a real pleasure to witness. Her performance of the concerto at Tonhalle last June was already excellent, but suffered from rather clueless orchestral playing - conductor Jakob Hrusa did a great Bartók Mandarin suite and Janácek Sinfonietta before and after, but he seemed to not have much of an idea what to do with the Schumann. This time, it all fell together perfectly well, and in fact the smaller sources worked very well for me, too.

The final Schubert was delightful - and I guess a good pick. Anything more substantial would have been an overkill after the exhilarating violin concerto (maybe this would have been a case where programming the concerto at the end would have made sense though? Zinman did that at Tonhalle a few years ago when he played a late Mozart symphony and the Brahms concerto with FP Zimmermann, and that made perfect sense).

Either way, great concert!

Nice review! I like Norrington in this repertoire.......anything chronologically later than these compositions can begin to get a bit controversial, but it is always interesting to hear. ;D

ComposerOfAvantGarde

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5282 on: February 07, 2018, 02:04:03 AM »
Great you'll get to see Meistersinger live, jessop! It's not that often one gets the chance. As for the price, if you consider the quality and the sheer quantity of the music  (5 hours of glory!), it really won't have been that expensive.. .  ;) :)

I know I won't regret it! Stefan Vinke and Warwick Fyfe (Walther and Beckmesser, respectively) are two singers I am excited to see again in some Wagner since their performances in our Ring cycle production I saw in 2016 as Siegfried and Alberich. Fyfe was certainly an impressive Alberich. The guy lives and breathes Wagner. I hope he does more performances overseas as well at some point because it is remarkable to see him on the stage. (found a video of him singing as Alberich with piano accompaniment, probably for some sponsors for the production https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93lBS06B5mU )
« Last Edit: February 07, 2018, 02:07:33 AM by jessop »

Offline king ubu

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5283 on: February 10, 2018, 07:52:55 AM »
Baritone Christian Gerhaher
Piano Gerold Huber

In a concert on the Studiobühne, the world-famous baritone Christian Gerhaher introduces himself to the audience. Gerhaher plays the lead role in Holliger's new opera Lunea, which deals with the fascinating romantic poet Nikolaus Lenau. Accompanied by his well-known piano partner Gerold Huber, he sings Robert Schumann's Lieder op. 90 on poems by Nikolaus Lenau, and then talks about his artistic work in an interview with Claus Spahn.

https://opernhaus.ch/en/spielplan/calendar/gespraechskonzert-christian-gerhaher/season_11232/

That again was most fascinating ... and having heard the Schumann violin concerto the night before was perfect, as they were discussing late Schumann for quite a while, the inherent modernity, the way in which he has piano and voice not fall into one into the late lieder but has them complement and interlock etc. Holliger was in the audience, they played some of the initial voice+piano version of his "Luena", which has then been reworked into voice+orchestra and is now being rehearsed in its (final?) version as an opera, with Gerhaher singing the main part (it seems Holliger only started composing once he was sure Gerhaher would sing - no one else can do it, he seems to think).

The programme was thus shaped among the common thread and comprised all of Schumann's lieder based on words by Nikolaus Lenau (Lunea-Lenau, get it?) - including one (WoO 26/2) that they reckoned may actually never have been performed in concert before (it is part of the Hyperion complete lieder edition of course - that one's on its way from jpc now ...):

Heinz Holliger – ELIS. Drei Nachtstücke für Klavier nach Georg Trakl
Robert Schumann – Sechs Gedichte (Nikolaus Lenau) und Requiem (Lebrecht Dreves) op. 90
Robert Schumann – Frühlingsgrüsse (Nikolaus Lenau) WoO 26/2
Robert Schumann – Vier Husarenlieder (Nikolaus Lenau) op. 117
Heinz Holliger – LUNEA. 23 Sätze von Nikolaus Lenau (Auszüge, genauer: 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18 & 22

encore: Robert Schumann – Die Grenadiere (Heinrich Heine)

--

next up, Monday night:

Rezital Maurizio Pollini
Carte blanche für den Grand Seigneur
Maurizio Pollini Klavier

Robert Schumann Arabeske op. 18
Robert Schumann Allegro h-Moll op. 8 für Klavier
Robert Schumann Konzert ohne Orchester f-Moll
Frédéric Chopin Nocturnes op. 55
Frédéric Chopin Klaviersonate Nr. 3 h-Moll op. 58
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Offline Draško

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5284 on: February 10, 2018, 09:53:41 AM »
Next Thursday:

Ligeti - Atmospheres
Rodrigo - Concierto de Aranjuez (harp transcription)
Tchaikovsky - Manfred Symphony

Xavier de Maistre (harp)
Belgrade Philharmonic
Uros Lajovic (cond.)

I'll be hearing all three pieces for the first time live, Rodrigo transcription the first time ever.

In reverse order: Manfred was boring. It was one of the slowest I heard at over an hour and there was too much stop-and-go. I couldn't quite figure out what was the conductor's conception. The orchestra played well, maybe some spark missing in the winds. Aranjuez transcription ... I don't know, it was quite impressive technically, but even if harp carries better, especially in high registers, it's more muted instrument lacking the vibrancy of the guitar. It was interesting to hear once. The audience loved de Maistre so he played two encores: Falla's Danza from La Vida Breve and Tarrega's Recuerdos de la Alhambra, both impressive, both I still prefer in their respective original forms. Highlight of the concert for me came early: Atmospheres ... that moment around the middle when winds go almost unbearably intense and shrill ... and then basses enter fortissimo :o hair-raising. Didn't know until now that hushed sound at the very end of piece is a soft cloth being rustled over piano strings, awesome.

Next concert is (not sure I'll be able to go) Zemlinsky Die Seejungfrau / Brahms Piano Concerto No.1. Fabrice Bollon conducting, Tamara Stefanovic the pianist.

Next one after that is Gliere's Il'ya Murometz conducted by Belgrade Phil. current MD Gabriel Feltz. That concert should be recorded for CD release. 

Offline Judith

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5285 on: February 11, 2018, 09:36:21 AM »
Was back at the Leeds Town Hall last night and saw

Dvořák      Two Slavonic Dances, Nos 14&16
Dvořák      Violin Concerto
Dvořák      Symphony No 9 (from New World)

Soloist    Josef Špaček
Conductor  Tomáš Netopil

Tomáš Netopil was in place of Jiří Bělohlávek who sadly passed away last May.

Offline Judith

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5286 on: February 14, 2018, 01:13:05 AM »
Was at "The Venue" Leeds College of Music yesterday evening and saw

Navarra String Quartet with Peter Donohoe

performing

Shostakovich String Quartet no 5
found this had elements of Cello Concerto at the beginning

Tchaikovsky String Quartet no 1 in D Major
my favourite String Quartet

Taneyev Piano Quintet in G Minor
performed with Peter Donohoe

Lovely performances by all

Offline Wanderer

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5287 on: February 14, 2018, 08:49:25 AM »
Friday, 2 February 2018
Auditorium Parco della Musica - Roma
Orchestra e Coro dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
Daniele Gatti

Schumann: Symphony No. 2
Schumann: Nachtlied
Schumann: Symphony No. 4

First time at the Santa Cecilia Hall. The all-wood interior looks more than a bit like the Megaron concert hall in Athens. And an all-Schumann program. Bring it!  8)

The concert was a huge success. Gatti had obviously given a lot of thought and attention into the things he wanted to coax from the orchestra and the results were both brilliant and felt fresh and personal. Tempi were lively and the first two movements of the Second Symphony, in particular, had a Schubertian vibe (the vibe of the Ninth Symphony), which was very suitable to the fabric of the music. Schumann's spirit was reistated for the remainder of the program and the orchestra's excellent playing was able to put to rest ridiculous notions I've read in the past of Schumann's symphonies being works that are somehow lacking in orchestration. Phrasing was suberb throughout both symphonies, with lots of individual touches and excellent balance between sections; antiphonal effects abounded -and delighted. Despite the ensemble's efforts, however, I was not much impressed by the Nachtlied, its only memorable moment for me being the delightful Mendelssohnian flourish of an ending, which could very well belong to a lost number from "A Midsummer Night's Dream". At the end of the concert, the audience was enthusiastic and rightly so. If a recording comes out of these concerts (February 1-3), I'd gladly buy it.

Online NikF

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5288 on: February 17, 2018, 09:01:44 AM »
RSNO 2017/18 - 'Under the skin of Brahms.'

Brahms struggled for ten years to complete his First Symphony – yet when you hear it, it’s like the passionate outpouring of a broken heart. Conductor Thomas Søndergård, presenter Ursula Heidecker Allen and the full RSNO go under its skin to uncover a story of tragedy, triumph and the power of art. With anecdotes, illustrations and live musical examples, it’s a fascinating way to get inside the world of a great symphony – and discover things you’ve never heard before.

Despite not being sure about this I've bought tickets for it anyway.
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Offline Brewski

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5289 on: February 23, 2018, 07:02:10 AM »
Last night, the avant-garde vocal group, Ekmeles, in their second appearance at the Crypt -- an actual crypt at a church here. The stone surfaces really flattered the program, a quartet of microtonal works. Hard to choose a favorite, but I really liked Rebecca Saunders' piece -- extremely difficult to sing, as was the entire program.

Catherine Lambpulse/shade (2014) 
Rebecca SaundersSoliloquy (2007)
Erin GeeThree Scenes from SLEEP (2008)
Marc SabatSeeds of Skies, Alibis (2017, world premiere)

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ComposerOfAvantGarde

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5290 on: February 23, 2018, 06:23:20 PM »
Last night, the avant-garde vocal group, Ekmeles, in their second appearance at the Crypt -- an actual crypt at a church here. The stone surfaces really flattered the program, a quartet of microtonal works. Hard to choose a favorite, but I really liked Rebecca Saunders' piece -- extremely difficult to sing, as was the entire program.

Catherine Lambpulse/shade (2014) 
Rebecca SaundersSoliloquy (2007)
Erin GeeThree Scenes from SLEEP (2008)
Marc SabatSeeds of Skies, Alibis (2017, world premiere)

--Bruce


Looks like a great programme! I love the work of Lamb and Saunders. Haven't heard the other pieces though. Contemporary vocal music of this kind is so satisfying to see performed.

Offline The new erato

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5291 on: February 23, 2018, 11:36:12 PM »
Goerne and Andsnes in an intimate all Scumann recital at Grieg's villa yesterday. What a fabulous singer.

Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5292 on: February 24, 2018, 09:35:03 PM »
With this concert, I was looking forward to the Cantata by von Einem. And a fine work, well performed it was. But it turned out that the Bruckner Zeroth was a show-stealer!



Review: Anton Bruckner's Zeroth Symphony, A Viennese Miracle

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2018/02/24/review-anton-bruckners-zeroth-symphony-a-viennese-miracle/#6b44363c14a1

ComposerOfAvantGarde

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5293 on: February 26, 2018, 04:41:53 AM »
Just saw my amazing friends Ziggy and Miles Johnston play this programme of Australian works at the Melbourne Recital Centre

Phillip Houghton
Wave Radiance

Richard Charlton
Refractions
Romanza
Spiral Eclipse

Phillip Houghton (Performed by Miles)
Stélé movement 1

Phillip Houghton (Performed by Ziggy)
God of the Northern Forest

Jessop Maticevski Shumack
Bergträume (world premiere)

Nigel Westlake
Songs from the Forest

https://www.melbournerecital.com.au/events/2018/australian-impressions/

There will also be a video uploaded of the concert later. Probably none of these composers are familiar to anyone here as they are pretty only well known in the community of classical guitarists and their fans here in Australia, but I reckon they deserve to be better known elsewhere too. The world premiere wasn't as structurally good as a composition as a piece I wrote for the duo five years ago, but they played it so so well that I think the piece came off better than I expected. I am glad to say it was the most controversial thing on the programme, with audience opinion quite divided between fans of the work and non-fans. Man, I love that kind of engagement with new music.

Offline king ubu

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5294 on: February 26, 2018, 05:16:44 AM »
next up, Monday night:

Rezital Maurizio Pollini
Carte blanche für den Grand Seigneur
Maurizio Pollini Klavier

Robert Schumann Arabeske op. 18
Robert Schumann Allegro h-Moll op. 8 für Klavier
Robert Schumann Konzert ohne Orchester f-Moll
Frédéric Chopin Nocturnes op. 55
Frédéric Chopin Klaviersonate Nr. 3 h-Moll op. 58

That was a great experience for sure ... but also somewhat ambiguous. I found the second half, and there the Chopin third sonata, the best part, I guess, although he repeatedly missed a note - or rather: hit a wrong one - in the opening part ... he really worked his way back and that performance was so "loaded", it was just breathtaking, towards the end he started spreading . The Schumann, well ... I'm afraid the huge sonata (concerto without orchestra) is not a piece I can relate all that much yet, and Pollini didn't change that substantially. The opening pieces, most of all the arabesque, were just warm-ups. The Nocturnes were nice indeed. He played three hefty Chopin encores, starting with a dazzling - and technically perfect - third scherzo ... the concert was a rollercoaster in all respects, and I was exhausted at the end - bet the elderly gentleman was so, too.

---

Now, considering (some of) these at the Lucerne festival this year, ticket sale starts next Monday:


Sa 18.8., 18:30 – KKL, Konzertsaal

Chamber Orchestra of Europe   
Bernard Haitink  Dirigent
Alina Ibragimova  Violine

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809–1847)
Ouvertüre Zum Märchen von der schönen Melusine op. 32
Konzert für Violine und Orchester e-Moll op. 64
Franz Schubert (1797–1828)
Sinfonie Nr. 8 C-Dur D 944 Grosse C-Dur-Sinfonie

https://www.lucernefestival.ch/de/programm/chamber-orchestra-of-europe-bernard-haitink-alina-ibragimova/794


Do. 30.8., 19:30 – KKL, Konzertsaal


Berliner Philharmoniker   
Kirill Petrenko  Dirigent
Yuja Wang  Klavier

60. Luzerner Bühnenjubiläum der Berliner Philharmoniker

Paul Dukas (1865–1935)
La Péri ou La Fleur d’immortalité
Sergej Prokofjew (1891–1953)
Konzert für Klavier und Orchester Nr. 3 C-Dur op. 26
Franz Schmidt (1874–1939)
Sinfonie Nr. 4 C-Dur

https://www.lucernefestival.ch/de/programm/berliner-philharmoniker-kirill-petrenko-yuja-wang/752


So 9.9., 19:30 – KKL, Konzertsaal

Orchester der LUCERNE FESTIVAL ACADEMY   
Matthias Pintscher  Dirigent
(Nono)
London Symphony Orchestra   
Sir Simon Rattle  Dirigent
(Messiaen)

Luigi Nono (1924–1990)
No hay caminos, hay que caminar … Andrej Tarkowskij für sieben Orchestergruppen
Olivier Messiaen (1908–1992)
Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum für Bläser und Schlagzeug

https://www.lucernefestival.ch/de/programm/orchester-der-lucerne-festival-academy-pintscher-london-symphony-orchestra-rattle/775


So 9.9., 21:00 – KKL, Konzertsaal


London Symphony Orchestra   
Orchester der LUCERNE FESTIVAL ACADEMY   
Sir Simon Rattle  Dirigent
Matthias Pintscher  Dirigent
Duncan Ward  Dirigent

Karlheinz Stockhausen (1928–2007)
Gruppen für drei Orchester

https://www.lucernefestival.ch/de/programm/london-symphony-orchestra-orchester-der-lucerne-festival-academy-rattle-pintscher-ward/793


Sa 15.9., 16:30 – KKL, Konzertsaal

City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra   
Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla  Dirigentin
Gidon Kremer  Violine

Antonín Dvořák (1841–1904)
Konzertouvertüre Othello op. 93
Mieczysław Weinberg (1919–1996)
Violinkonzert g-Moll op. 67
Antonín Dvořák (1841–1904)
Sinfonie Nr. 9 e-Moll op. 95 Aus der Neuen Welt

https://www.lucernefestival.ch/de/programm/city-of-birmingham-symphony-orchestra-mirga-grazinyte-tyla-gidon-kremer/883


---

Quite sure about Haitink/COE/Ibragimova, Petrenko/Berlin Phil/Wang and the Nono/Messiaen/Stockhausen combo (two concerts in a row) ... less sure about the final one, would actually go for Kremer/Weinberg only, I guess.

There are also these ... Vienna Phil/Welser-Möst doing Bruckner could be quite amazing, I think ... and the Berlin Phil/Petrenko might be a worthy alternative to the one above (but then that one looks more enticing to me, plus it's not on a working day):

Fr 7.9., 1930 – KKL, Konzertsaal

Wiener Philharmoniker   
Franz Welser-Möst  Dirigent
Sol Gabetta  Violoncello

Joseph Haydn (1732–1809)
Konzert für Violoncello und Orchester C-Dur Hob. VIIb:1
Anton Bruckner (1824–1896)
Sinfonie Nr. 5 B-Dur WAB 105

https://www.lucernefestival.ch/de/programm/wiener-philharmoniker-franz-welser-most-sol-gabetta/771


Mi 29.8., 19:30 – KKL, Konzertsaal

Berliner Philharmoniker   
Kirill Petrenko  Dirigent

60. Luzerner Bühnenjubiläum der Berliner Philharmoniker

Richard Strauss (1864–1949)
Don Juan op. 20
Tod und Verklärung op. 24
Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827)
Sinfonie Nr. 7 A-Dur op. 92

https://www.lucernefestival.ch/de/programm/berliner-philharmoniker-kirill-petrenko/750


opinions, anyone?
Es wollt ein meydlein grasen gan:
Fick mich, lieber Peter!
Und do die roten röslein stan:
Fick mich, lieber Peter!
Fick mich mehr, du hast dein ehr.
Kannstu nit, ich wills dich lern.
Fick mich, lieber Peter!

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Offline Mahlerian

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5295 on: February 26, 2018, 08:28:34 AM »
Just saw my amazing friends Ziggy and Miles Johnston play this programme of Australian works at the Melbourne Recital Centre

Phillip Houghton
Wave Radiance

Richard Charlton
Refractions
Romanza
Spiral Eclipse

Phillip Houghton (Performed by Miles)
Stélé movement 1

Phillip Houghton (Performed by Ziggy)
God of the Northern Forest

Jessop Maticevski Shumack
Bergträume (world premiere)

Nigel Westlake
Songs from the Forest

https://www.melbournerecital.com.au/events/2018/australian-impressions/

There will also be a video uploaded of the concert later. Probably none of these composers are familiar to anyone here as they are pretty only well known in the community of classical guitarists and their fans here in Australia, but I reckon they deserve to be better known elsewhere too. The world premiere wasn't as structurally good as a composition as a piece I wrote for the duo five years ago, but they played it so so well that I think the piece came off better than I expected. I am glad to say it was the most controversial thing on the programme, with audience opinion quite divided between fans of the work and non-fans. Man, I love that kind of engagement with new music.

I'm familiar with one of them!   ;)
"l do not consider my music as atonal, but rather as non-tonal. I feel the unity of all keys. Atonal music by modern composers admits of no key at all, no feeling of any definite center." - Arnold Schoenberg

Offline Brian

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5296 on: February 26, 2018, 08:36:20 AM »
24 Feb
Mahler | Symphony No 2

Dallas SO | Jaap van Zweden
My first time seeing Mahler 2 live. Jaap leads an account that starts out feeling like it will be a slow burn...but slow burns still burn, after all. :) The finale is as visceral and heart-pounding as it should be. Dorothea Röschmann and Michelle DeYoung were luxury casting for the solo parts. Girlfriend's reaction: "Well that was melodramatic!" She later said she enjoyed all of it except "the cuckoo part, I thought a bird was going to attack me."

Offline Pat B

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5297 on: February 26, 2018, 11:39:31 AM »
There will also be a video uploaded of the concert later. Probably none of these composers are familiar to anyone here as they are pretty only well known in the community of classical guitarists and their fans here in Australia, but I reckon they deserve to be better known elsewhere too. The world premiere wasn't as structurally good as a composition as a piece I wrote for the duo five years ago, but they played it so so well that I think the piece came off better than I expected. I am glad to say it was the most controversial thing on the programme, with audience opinion quite divided between fans of the work and non-fans. Man, I love that kind of engagement with new music.

:)

Please link us the video when available.

Offline Draško

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5298 on: February 26, 2018, 12:28:50 PM »
Next concert is (not sure I'll be able to go) Zemlinsky Die Seejungfrau / Brahms Piano Concerto No.1. Fabrice Bollon conducting, Tamara Stefanovic the pianist.

Next one after that is Gliere's Il'ya Murometz conducted by Belgrade Phil. current MD Gabriel Feltz. That concert should be recorded for CD release.

As predicted I missed the top one, but should be hearing Ilya Murometz on Friday, it'll serve as first listen Friday.

Offline Draško

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Re: What concerts are you looking forward to? (Part II)
« Reply #5299 on: February 26, 2018, 12:45:20 PM »
opinions, anyone?

My line of reasoning is pretty similar to yours.

Wang/Petrenko, Nono/Messiaen and Stockhausen definitely. I'm bit weary of Schubert's C-Major with chamber orchestra, could sound malnourished...and then it's a long piece.

Strauss/Beethoven one is warhorses but Petrenko is such a huge talent that personally I'd love to hear his take on those. And Don Juan and Beethoven's 7th are so beautiful pieces.

Bruckner/Welser-Most will probably be much more upholstered affair but hearing the VPO in Bruckner would be worth it for me.

The Kremer one doesn't look particularly enticing to me, but Gražinytė-Tyla is pretty hyped in British press these days so if you have time and ticket money maybe it's worth seeing if the hype is true.