Author Topic: Cabezón, Arauxo, Cabanilles etc etc  (Read 19375 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 11613
Re: Cabezón, Arauxo, Cabanilles etc etc
« Reply #120 on: December 29, 2018, 01:38:47 AM »
I’ve sometimes had a bit of trouble appreciating Cabezon on record, that’s not to say that I haven’t enjoyed many things by him, but occasionally I’ve felt that fundamentally he’s not a composer for me.

Reading Leon Berben’s essay in his new recording for Aeolus, I’m starting to see that Canezon is specially challenging to get off the page. In fact, I see that his publisher (i.e, his son) asked people to be indulgent in their judgement of the music

Quote
In the  the Proemio or introduction to the ”Obras de música para tecla, arpa y vihuela” (1578), Hernando de Cabezón, son of Antonio and publisher of much of his father’s music, writes the following: ”His duties and travels did not allow him to compose as he could have done in tran- quillity and ease. And as far as the content of this vol- ume is concerned, one must compare it with the crumbs that fell from his dish rather than view it as premeditated and well-wrought compositions; are they not merely pieces which he used to teach his pu- pils, which do not represent the artistic judgement of the master but were tailored to talent and skills”.

Berben goes on to suggest that the scores require a particularly imaginative, creative, interpretation - his reading of Fray Tomás de Santa María’s ”Libro llamado Arte de tañer fantasiá para tecla, vihuela y todo instrumento...” and other documents lead him to the conclusion that

Quote
the written music does not (always) include all the information re- quired for its execution and is sooner intended ’only’ as point of departure for performance. But it is not simply a matter of adding the cus- tomary ornaments such as trills and mordents (mostly referred to as quiebro and redoble). The characteristic glosas too, based on the embel- lishment of intervals – the art of diminution – are vital to the performance of Iberian music. In his ”Tratado de glosas” Diego Ortiz (1553), for example, meticulously describes this type of or- namentation.

Rather fancifully, Berben suggests that Canezon’s blindness may itself indicate that when he played at least, he was specially free

Quote
Is the blind musician liber- ated from the slavery of the physical score and
14 the necessity of a finished, definitive version? Does this not also underline the position of the interpreter, of the improviser? Experience and memory gain new importance and create the circumstances for new and perhaps unforeseen occurrences.

Re the music itself Koos van de Linde, who’s involved in the production of the booklet at least,  says the following

Quote
. . .  Cabezón’s works are not purely organ or keyboard music, but rather abstract compositions to be played on all sorts of instruments

I’ve not had a chance to listen to the whole recording yet, but I’m wondering what the impact, if any, of this last idea will be for his interpretations. In the booklet, Berben does not comment on Koos van de Linde’s proposal.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2018, 01:53:34 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 11613
Re: Cabezón, Arauxo, Cabanilles etc etc
« Reply #121 on: March 04, 2019, 03:38:30 AM »


It's nice that this CD exists, because the music's rare, especially on a harpsichord. Nishiyama is a harpist as well as a keyboard player, so I was hoping for harp effects on the clave, but if there are any I didn't notice -- on harpsichord the music remains a bit tough, but not unbearable. I just wish that Nishyama varied her attacks more, and I wish that she had the skill to make her music less flat -- to give the sense of one voice interrupting or supporting another to create a 3D texture. But when she recorded this, her first CD I think, she hadn't. She's a bit grim monochrome too, and is not beyond pounding the keyboard with her boots. Ouch.

The final three tracks are on a virginal, and here she begins to show a slightly more tender and poetic sensibility.

After listening to it I went back to Erdas in Cabezon



and here we're in an altogether superior world of music making -- so it can be done.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline (: premont :)

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 7265
Re: Cabezón, Arauxo, Cabanilles etc etc
« Reply #122 on: May 10, 2019, 01:35:46 PM »
Leon Berben plays organ music by Cabezon on the Gothic organ in St. Andreas Soest-Ostönnen.

The organ is meant to stem from the early 14th century. It is well preserved and recently well restored, and is claimed to contain the oldest existing still sounding pipes. It contains seven stops on one manual.  Temperature unequal after Schlick modified by Harald Vogel without further specification. The sound of the organ is individual, magnificent and athmospheric, and the sound quality of the recording is outstanding. Leon Berben's well-known rather strict style suits Cabezon's music very well and creates a meditative (Mandryka would probably say mystic) aura around the music. My only objection is, that the differencias, which obviously are secular music, should be interpreted a tad more flexible, preferably on harpsicord.

Need I to write, that this CD is a must.
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline "Harry"

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 6540
  • Don't waste your energy trying to convince people.
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: Cabezón, Arauxo, Cabanilles etc etc
« Reply #123 on: May 10, 2019, 01:41:29 PM »
Leon Berben plays organ music by Cabezon on the Gothic organ in St. Andreas Soest-Ostönnen.

The organ is meant to stem from the early 14th century. It is well preserved and recently well restored, and is claimed to contain the oldest existing still sounding pipes. It contains seven stops on one manual.  Temperature unequal after Schlick modified by Harald Vogel without further specification. The sound of the organ is individual, magnificent and athmospheric, and the sound quality of the recording is outstanding. Leon Berben's well-known rather strict style suits Cabezon's music very well and creates a meditative (Mandryka would probably say mystic) aura around the music. My only objection is, that the differencias, which obviously are secular music, should be interpreted a tad more flexible, preferably on harpsicord.

Need I to write, that this CD is a must.

On my ordering list. Thank you Poul for the thumbs up
There comes a point in your life when you realize: Who matters, Who never did, Who won't anymore, And who always will. So, don't worry about people from your past, there's a reason why they didn't make it to your future.

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 11613
Re: Cabezón, Arauxo, Cabanilles etc etc
« Reply #124 on: May 10, 2019, 08:46:21 PM »


This is the start of an interesting essay on style in Cabanilles by Andrés Cea Galán, interesting because it shows how hard it is to make authentic style judgements, it’s taken from Vol. 3 of Timothy Roberts’s survey, the previous two volumes I found  myself very much enjoying, so I’m looking forward to getting to know this third.

Quote
From the standpoint of present knowledge it is rather hard to comment on matters of style in relation either to Spanish instrumental music in general, or to Cabanilles’ keyboard music in particular. Numerous musical sources (scores, treatises) survive to provide a quantity of explicit details that cast light on the form and structure of his compositions and enable scholars to analyse his use of counterpoint and harmony. Such objective criteria enable each work to be ascribed to one of a range of particular musical genres, although by their nature such stylistic categories must remain tentative.

When one turns to the interpretation of Cabanilles’ music, the information provided by those explicit, ‘foreground’ elements is overshadowed by the much more important implicit ones. The latter include essential aspects of performance such as, first, the selection of the instruments to be used, taking into account, for example, the number and range of the manuals; the style and number of the stops, and their pitch and temperament. It is then also necessary to consider questions of tempo, and variations of tempo; the use of suitable fingering and articulation (including rhythmic inequality); the introduction of appropriate ornaments; and finally the actual use of the manuals and the registrations the instrument makes available.

In the process of (re)discovering such implicit elements in the music, questions will also arise concerning the function of the pieces in their historical context, as well as about the intended meaning of the music in that context, including any rhetoric and symbolism that may be associated with a particular composition. Last but not least, there is the capacity of Cabanilles’ music to transmit a specific mood or emotion, which performers have to try to deliver convincingly to the listener. Such historical aspects of an interpretation will have an enormous influence from the stylistic point of view; but even if one gets that far, alongside the knowledge gained from an extensive, complimentary study of documents and of the organological evidence, the personal approach that each performer brings is another vital element in the understanding of this music.

The problem of defining style is even more complex when one considers the possible influences on Cabanilles in the course of his career, and the way in which those influences may be reflected in his compositions. To state that Valencia, where he made his living as a musician and as a priest, was historically connected to Italy politically, socially, culturally and economically, is to say both everything and nothing: such links are the inevitable result of a natural relationship between two seventeenth- century Catholic countries facing each other across the Mediterranean in the era of the Counter-Reformation.

The manuscripts containing Cabanilles’ music do indeed include some keyboard pieces by Italian, or Italianate, composers, such as Frescobaldi, Froberger and Kerll, as well as instrumental balleti e correnti and even some of Corelli’s violin sonatas and

concertos. But it should be observed that some of those collections also offer a few copies of French keyboard works, by Couperin or Lebègue, for example, as well as many arrangements of single movements from Lully’s operas and ballets. To this extent the Cabanilles sources are not exceptional, as several other Spanish sources of keyboard, harp or guitar music dating from his lifetime also contain Italian and French pieces among the traditional Spanish compositions. Such examples leave no doubt that around 1700 Spanish musicians absorbed foreign tastes and influences both in their composing and their playing, although it is difficult to be sure of the degree to which they were really conscious of such stylistic subtleties, or how they treated them in practical terms. To sum up, musicology has yet to investigate in depth how far Cabanilles was able to assimilate such different idioms, or to bring the style of his compositions into conformity with those foreign influences.


« Last Edit: May 10, 2019, 08:57:24 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 11613
Re: Cabezón, Arauxo, Cabanilles etc etc
« Reply #125 on: May 10, 2019, 08:54:49 PM »
Leon Berben plays organ music by Cabezon on the Gothic organ in St. Andreas Soest-Ostönnen.

The organ is meant to stem from the early 14th century. It is well preserved and recently well restored, and is claimed to contain the oldest existing still sounding pipes. It contains seven stops on one manual.  Temperature unequal after Schlick modified by Harald Vogel without further specification. The sound of the organ is individual, magnificent and athmospheric, and the sound quality of the recording is outstanding. Leon Berben's well-known rather strict style suits Cabezon's music very well and creates a meditative (Mandryka would probably say mystic) aura around the music. My only objection is, that the differencias, which obviously are secular music, should be interpreted a tad more flexible, preferably on harpsicord.

Need I to write, that this CD is a must.

Apparently in Spain, the use of the organ was forbidden in Holy Week, which gives some  credence to the idea that even the pieces which aren’t variations may have been heard publicly on a harpsichord.

I recently listened to a lot of Cabezon recordings and yes, I enjoyed very much Berben. But I also enjoyed some of the music on Astronio’s set, in particular those pieces played on harpsichord or on brass instruments - organ less so on the whole.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2019, 08:56:25 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen