Author Topic: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)  (Read 301417 times)

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Offline André

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Re: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
« Reply #1820 on: December 01, 2019, 06:07:58 AM »
I later wanted to do it as a performance with an acquaintance... but it turned out that my voice does NOT carry over a grand piano being played behind me.

Incidentally, Thomas Mann published the 8th chapter as a standalone essay in English in Harper's Magazine (or some other such mag.), so there's precedent for reading just that. It's riproaringly funny, too... which was what surprised the above-mentioned lady in question the most, because she hadn't thought of Mann that way.

There is plenty of humour in The Buddenbrooks, The Magic Mountain and Joseph and his Brothers, too (particularly in the latter, IMO). But for some unfathomable reason I never ‘cracked’ Doktor Faustus  :(.

Offline George

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Re: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
« Reply #1821 on: December 01, 2019, 06:58:47 AM »
"I can't live without music, because music is life." - Yvonne Lefébure

Offline Cato

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Re: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
« Reply #1822 on: December 02, 2019, 05:59:27 AM »
There is plenty of humour in The Buddenbrooks, The Magic Mountain and Joseph and his Brothers, too (particularly in the latter, IMO). But for some unfathomable reason I never ‘cracked’ Doktor Faustus  :(.

I once composed the first act of an opera with 19-tone scales (7 quarter-tones) and also used 24-tone rows (??????) based on Doctor Faustus.  I wrote the text in German and used parts of the novel itself in the libretto.

A funny story: I took the libretto to my former German professor, a very nice lady, to be corrected.

At one point she had highlighted a sentence and asked me: "How did you come up with this?"

I said: "I didn't!  Thomas Mann did!  That's taken directly from the novel."

After looking a little confused and skeptical, she said: "Oh, well, all right then."

The implication was: if I had written the sentence, it was wrong.   ???

But since Thomas Mann had written it, it was fine!   :D
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Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
« Reply #1823 on: December 03, 2019, 01:29:30 AM »

At one point she had highlighted a sentence and asked me: "How did you come up with this?"

I said: "I didn't!  Thomas Mann did!  That's taken directly from the novel."

After looking a little confused and skeptical, she said: "Oh, well, all right then."

The implication was: if I had written the sentence, it was wrong.   ???

But since Thomas Mann had written it, it was fine!   :D

That is, in fact, how it goes. When I first started translating, I was told by a professor-friend: Don't ever let on that you're German. Don't have an accent, make sure everything is idiomatic, and get all the colloquialisms right. Once they trust you are a native speaker, you will get away with being creative with language and -- if it's actually good -- it's considered inventive. If they think you're a foreigner, it'll be considered a mistake, no matter how good it is.

Offline Cato

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Re: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827): Schroeder of Peanuts
« Reply #1824 on: December 09, 2019, 09:58:42 AM »
That is, in fact, how it goes. When I first started translating, I was told by a professor-friend: Don't ever let on that you're German. Don't have an accent, make sure everything is idiomatic, and get all the colloquialisms right. Once they trust you are a native speaker, you will get away with being creative with language and -- if it's actually good -- it's considered inventive. If they think you're a foreigner, it'll be considered a mistake, no matter how good it is.

Later on in my career I discovered that such is indeed "how it goes."   ;)

I was talking with someone about what seems to be right now the lack of a "bridge" into classical music from the usual jibber-jabber of our kulcher.  (The news yesterday had a profile of some teenager who "writes songs" in her bedroom, puts them on YouTube, and improbably became "rich and famous."  Why could that not be the case for a classical-music prodigy?)

The comic strip Peanuts was an example of a "bridge" into classical music, and specifically Beethoven.  The character Schroeder (I do not believe the first name was ever revealed) is a prodigy with a semi-magical toy piano which can play works by Beethoven (and a few others, "Papa Haydn" was once mentioned).

I recall several of my grade-school classmates becoming interested in Beethoven specifically because of Peanuts.

One would think that grade-school music would mention Beethoven, but...

I use parts of Beethoven's Missa Solemnis in my Latin classes to catalyze some interest.


"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)