Author Topic: Squarcialupi!  (Read 2040 times)

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Offline atm

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #20 on: December 03, 2018, 11:47:35 AM »
This seems interesting.

https://pastebin.com/raw/3kh81iAi

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #21 on: December 03, 2018, 02:01:09 PM »


This CD from Sollazzo Ensemble, their second, has won much praise this year, and I concur. The ensemble is made up for vielles, harp and voices. Much of the material on the CD is from Squarcialupi composers.

Why is it so good? Well it’s fluid, it’s expressive with both words and melody, and their voices are beautiful. But that’s not the real reason. The real reason is that they sing like a team, responsively, with a sense of freshness and discovery and pleasure in performance. There is nothing whatsoever routine or blasé about their art.

You can hear them and see them here, I’m specially fond of the final song by Loyset Compère. Here they use early arrangements in manuscripts testifying to a medieval tradition of blind vielle players.

<a href="https://youtube.com/v/nYjxQ4giHWg" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://youtube.com/v/nYjxQ4giHWg</a>
« Last Edit: December 03, 2018, 02:27:43 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #22 on: December 16, 2018, 06:10:58 AM »
Here are some comments on rhythm by Mark Everist (taken from one of John Potter's Conductus CDs), really about earlier music than you find in the Squarcialupi manuscript, but nevertheless not uninteresting

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Over the course of the last 150 years, it has been proposed that these sections—which do the all-important work of projecting the poetic text—should be interpreted in the same way as caudae: in other words, according to the rhythmic modes. The immense difficulty in making the notation look remotely like any of the rhythmic patterns that the rhythmic modes involve has led others to argue for a relaxed interpretation of the notation but still within the context of the rhythmic modes. Some have argued for duple rhythm, while others have suggested that the unmeasured notation probably indicates a non-metrical, rhythmically flexible type of performance.

Arguments in favour of the use of the rhythmic modes are either circular (the music must be metrical because the conductus might have been used as a processional / the music is used as a processional because it is metrically regular) or based on a faulty understanding of the poetic principles underpinning rithmus (the poetry used in the conductus repertory). Rithmus usually tells us little about the accentual control over the line except for the cadence (paroxytonic or proparoxytonic), but editors over the years have claimed to see quantitative feet in the poetry, as if it were Virgil, and have drawn conclusions about which rhythmic mode to use as a result. This has been shown to be false.

So while we can be sure that the caudae of the conducti are to be performed in accordance with the rhythmic modes (as they are on this recording), it is much less clear how the syllabic musica cum littera might be performed. Significant amounts of experimentation of all types of delivery have led to a style of performance that rejects a priori rhythmic systems that are inappropriate or anachronistic, and that places the poetry at the centre of the performance's stage. This leads to a number of consequences, many of which are audible here. The first thing is not only the clear declamation of the poetry, but a flexibility on the part of the singers to declaim the poetry according to the way they might read and understand it; this is particularly interesting in strophic settings where—notionally—the same music is used for all the stanzas, but where the singer can articulate the poetry in different ways, with the same musical superstructure lightly adjusted in the light of the poetry. This can be heard, for example, by comparing the openings of the first two stanzas of `Ut non ponam' and contrasting the ways in which the first stanza (`Ut non ponam os in celum') and the second (Munda manus debet esse') begin and continue, subtly giving emphasis to different words, and declaiming the text at different speeds depending on meaning. Other, smaller-scale consequences of non-metrical but rhythmically flexible performance are the regular simultaneous presentation of ligatures of four and three notes, three and two notes, and other combinations, which hark back to the music of previous generations.

MARK EVERIST

The prima le parole idea expressed here is one I'm very attracted to emotionally . . .

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The first thing is not only the clear declamation of the poetry, but a flexibility on the part of the singers to declaim the poetry according to the way they might read and understand it
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Offline San Antone

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #23 on: December 16, 2018, 06:26:19 AM »
Here are some comments on rhythm by Mark Everist (taken from one of John Potter's Conductus CDs), really about earlier music than you find in the Squarcialupi manuscript, but nevertheless not uninteresting

The prima le parole idea expressed here is one I'm very attracted to emotionally . . .

Have you warmed to the Conductus CDs?  I can't keep up with your tastes.   ;)  One minute you way you prefer polyphony to monophony then a week later it is the opposite.

 8)

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #24 on: December 16, 2018, 06:40:40 AM »
Have you warmed to the Conductus CDs?  I can't keep up with your tastes.   ;)  One minute you way you prefer polyphony to monophony then a week later it is the opposite.

 8)

I don't think it's totally monophonic. Heterophonic maybe.  And no, I haven't bought CDs 1 and 3, though I'm tempted because I'm interested in the performers, I've had CD 2 for ages, all the booklets are on line.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2018, 06:42:57 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #25 on: December 16, 2018, 10:22:29 AM »
By the way, San, given your taste for desert landscapes unaccompanied monophony and blokes' voices, I hope you've discovered this CD



details here

http://www.marcmauillon.com/?page_id=532
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Offline San Antone

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #26 on: December 16, 2018, 10:51:36 AM »
By the way, San, given your taste for desert landscapes unaccompanied monophony and blokes' voices, I hope you've discovered this CD



details here

http://www.marcmauillon.com/?page_id=532

Yes, it does look good.  Thanks.  ;)

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #27 on: January 08, 2019, 02:01:44 PM »


I’d completely forgotten about this recording, which contains quite a bit of music by Squarcialupi composers. And what a joy to rediscover it. What I want to say is this: the performances communicate the musicians’ enthusiasm for the music, their total and inspired involvement, their alpha-state. In this respect at least, Peres is like Schmelzer: they both know how to get the best from the people who work with them.

A capella, rather energetic and exciting rather than sensual and curvaceous, , a pulse without stiffness, only male singers, often sung more for melody than harmony I’d say.  Peres is one of the few, maybe the only one in fact, who can make me really enjoy this approach.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2019, 02:05:26 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #28 on: March 06, 2019, 11:08:52 PM »


Does anyone know who the singers are on this Jacopo de Bologna CD? James Bowman is probably one of them. The vocal music on the recording is rather good I think.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2019, 11:24:50 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline pjme

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #29 on: March 07, 2019, 12:22:55 AM »
Ricercare Ensemble für Alte Musik Zürich
Wally Staempfli - soprano
Kurt Huber - tenor and percussion
Fritz Naf - tenor
Michel Piguet - Schalmei, recorder, tambourine
Christopher Schmidt - rebec, portativ
Jordi Savall - fidel, percussion
Françoise Stein - harp
Anthony Bailes - lute, bandurria, drum

Michel Piguet, conductor
1973 recording (LP). The cd was issued in 2000.

Peter



« Last Edit: March 07, 2019, 12:28:40 AM by pjme »

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #30 on: March 07, 2019, 01:02:59 AM »
Thanks, some good singers there who I'd like to hear more of.
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #31 on: March 07, 2019, 07:37:50 AM »
Ricercare Ensemble für Alte Musik Zürich
Fritz Naf - tenor

Small correction:

Fritz Näf or Naef

http://www.fritz-naef.ch/
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heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline pjme

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #32 on: March 07, 2019, 08:44:39 AM »
 :) Setting the record straight!