Author Topic: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)  (Read 46557 times)

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Offline Jeffrey Smith

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #200 on: August 23, 2015, 06:07:47 PM »
Dommage! Disponible uniquement au Royaume-Uni.  :( :(


Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #201 on: August 24, 2015, 04:18:40 AM »



I own the recording.
But I would have loved to hear the live performance.
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline Gordo

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #202 on: August 24, 2015, 07:24:22 AM »
I own the recording.
But I would have loved to hear the live performance.

I'm cur¡ous, Poul. Do you prefer Ibragimova or Wallfisch playing the S&P? IIRC, when Ibragimova's set was released, Wallfisch disappeared from the Hyperion's catalogue. I think even the economic version (Dyad) is OOP now.
Isn't it funny? The truth just sounds different.
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Offline aukhawk

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #203 on: August 25, 2015, 02:33:34 AM »
Dommage! Disponible uniquement au Royaume-Uni.  :( :(

Oh I didn't realise.  I'm sorry to hear that.  :(
It seems to me her approach and timings etc are largely unchanged, the slow movements are spellbinding, the fastest ones inevitably contain a very few inaccuracies, nothing of any significance - but mainly the visual effect is quite gripping - very theatrical.

« Last Edit: August 25, 2015, 09:59:18 AM by aukhawk »

Offline Herman

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #204 on: August 25, 2015, 11:16:39 AM »
Has the Onyx recording by Viktoria Mullova been mentioned? It's very good.

Sorry to say I have yet to hear anything by Ibragimova that's really good rather than maybe promising.

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #205 on: August 26, 2015, 03:09:11 AM »
I'm cur¡ous, Poul. Do you prefer Ibragimova or Wallfisch playing the S&P? IIRC, when Ibragimova's set was released, Wallfisch disappeared from the Hyperion's catalogue. I think even the economic version (Dyad) is OOP now.

I had not listened to either of these since long, so I revisited the first half of Wallfisch's recording to day.

As far as I recall, Ibragimova's interpretation is youthful, perfectionist and kind of cautious.

Wallfisch's interpretation on the other hand is flowing and eloquent, with a slight tendency to over-interpretation in the fugue of the a-minor sonata.
And I do not like, that she skips some of the repeats.

Do I need to prefer one to the other?

Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline Gordo

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #206 on: August 26, 2015, 05:37:17 AM »
I had not listened to either of these since long, so I revisited the first half of Wallfisch's recording to day.

As far as I recall, Ibragimova's interpretation is youthful, perfectionist and kind of cautious.

Wallfisch's interpretation on the other hand is flowing and eloquent, with a slight tendency to over-interpretation in the fugue of the a-minor sonata.
And I do not like, that she skips some of the repeats.

Do I need to prefer one to the other?

Thanks!

And there is no need of preferring one to another, of course.  :)
Isn't it funny? The truth just sounds different.
-- Penny Lane, Almost Famous (2000)

Offline aukhawk

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #207 on: August 26, 2015, 06:40:55 AM »
Has the Onyx recording by Viktoria Mullova been mentioned? It's very good.

First mentioned here in April 2009, and periodically since.  It is indeed among the best I think - but there are so many excellent recordings ...
http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,4964.msg301047.html#msg301047

« Last Edit: August 26, 2015, 06:54:24 AM by aukhawk »

Offline aukhawk

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #208 on: August 26, 2015, 06:51:14 AM »
Another still from the concert:



I watched the 3rd movement (Andante) from the 2nd Suite twice - deceptively simple-sounding music, but I still can't see how it's done.  That is, I can hear what's going on but I can't see it, it's like a trick of legerdemain.  In an accompanying interview she mentions that this is one of her favourite movements and "you have to be two people".

Offline aukhawk

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #209 on: August 31, 2015, 06:27:45 AM »
Well I was unable to watch much of the 2nd broadcast (P2, S3, P3) because my wife threatened to leave home  ???

She usually only does that if I'm thoughtless enough to play Reich or Glass at high volume.  >:D

But there were some pretty bad moments, especially in the 3rd Sonata, and the sound balance didn't help by being over-close, probably because the audience was being a bit noisy.  The 3rd Partita however went a lot better.

     

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #210 on: December 02, 2016, 07:47:54 AM »
Generally quite far towards the slow end of the spectrum (only Huggett is consistently slower, and there is another one in round 2 that is a similar pace) - contemplative and 'free', rather like an Indian musician playing an Alap (I listen to quite a lot of Indian music, when I can tear myself away from Bach).  Not that I am any kind of expert, on either.
I seem to have acquired this taste, in the last couple of years, for the 'free-er' versions - probably also why I like Beyer, described by one person as "outside of time, like an improvisation".

(Well, at least my 3rd and last horse is still running  :-X )

And I had never come across Kaakinen before either, until I was trawling around last autumn looking for 'jokers' to sprinkle into the comparison - but have listened several times since then, she's definitely my 'go to' for this music at the moment.

I was just killing time browsing your thread and saw this, and it made me wonder if you've heard Helene Schmitt and whether you like it. Re Kaakinen-Pitch my superficial impression is that there's something a bit too forceful and emphatic about her style to be something I like, but aim probably not really doing her justice.

Helene Schmitt is inclined to be slow and is also rather delicate. She style is very (too?) inflected, but I don't think it's random inflection. 
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline aukhawk

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #211 on: December 02, 2016, 10:52:16 AM »
Yes I like Schmitt, but I like several others more.  I'm not really very discriminating, I'm happy to listen to most performances of this music.  and would take any one of half-a-dozen to my desert island.  Incidentally we had this conversation 3 years ago  ;) see reply #172 in this thread.

Offline aukhawk

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Re: Bach's Violin Sonatas & Partitas (solo)
« Reply #212 on: October 31, 2017, 03:28:48 AM »
This is worth a listen if you don't mind the modern instrument.


Tetzlaff's earlier recording on Hanssler fell at the first hurdle in the recent blind comparison, though not disgraced, he scored the same as Beyer and Kaakinen,and slightly higher than Schmitt, drawing comments such as:
"Oldfashioned and conventional, rather unremarkable."
"in the Gigue the performer almost makes it sound like a cadenza in a concerto."


This new recording is a marked improvement I think.  He doesn't indulge much in rubato, but does vary the dynamics a lot (and to a lesser extent, the tone).  Mostly he plays this music quietly, with a sweet rather feminine tone.  The fugues are very impressive, taken rather briskly and with everything clearly delineated with a very sure touch.  My initial thought on listening to Sonata 2 (which is where I usually start, when assessing an unfamiliar recording) was 'similar to Julia Fischer' but on listening further that's not really fair to either performer, they are quite different to be sure, but nevertheless that is the general area where we are here.

In an accompanying sleevenote at one point Tetzlaff suggests that the Chaconne (Partita 2) and the first two movements of Sonata 3 can be grouped together as a sort of triptych, and that Bach himself encourages this by starting Sonata 3 on the same page of the score as the end of the Chaconne.  Well as to that, I think Bach always was a bit averse to white space when laying out his scores.  ;)  But it is interesting to listen to these three movements in this light.

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