Author Topic: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread  (Read 78241 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #600 on: January 21, 2018, 08:58:34 AM »


CPO's second installment of their complete Pachelbel contains something I've never come across before, some "psalmlieder" played by James David Christie, they're a sort of fantasy based on a psalm I suppose   -- am I wrong to think that no one else has recorded this music? Anyway here they are, and one of them at least is interesting enough (psalm 124 for example, a big set of variations on psalm 130 too, which I bet could be made very attractive.)  I can't find anything on the organ online either, and for some reason I can't download the booklet to see if there is a mention of them.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2018, 11:07:00 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline XB-70 Valkyrie

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #601 on: January 21, 2018, 10:24:41 PM »
Was just listening to some Purcell anthems today and realized I have virtually no English organ music.  :o  Spanish organ music has always put me off a bit because much of what I've heard seems a bit bombastic and I'm not a huge fan of the brass stops. Anyway, are there any good sets of English or Spanish organ music to be recommended to the curious listener (who loves the 22 CD French set with Marie-Claire Alain)?
If you really dislike Bach you keep quiet about it! - Andras Schiff

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #602 on: January 22, 2018, 01:05:50 PM »
Well I mentioned Kenneth Gilbert's recording at Lanvellec to you before. In addition you may want to try to hear Christopher Stembridge's CD called Wondrous Machine. Another one to explore is Ton Koopman's recording from Addington Hall, and Colin Tilney at Knoll. For Blow specifically, I like Timothy Robert's CD. Leonhardt recorded quite a lot of Purcell and Blow - later in his career there's some Blow at the Dom Bedos in Bordeaux and earlier there's a whole CD dedicated to these two composers. A more old fashioned style, but nevertheless one I find very rewarding, is Thurston Dart's recording of English organ music.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2018, 11:38:05 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #603 on: January 22, 2018, 02:15:48 PM »


CPO's second installment of their complete Pachelbel contains something I've never come across before, some "psalmlieder" played by James David Christie, they're a sort of fantasy based on a psalm I suppose   -- am I wrong to think that no one else has recorded this music? Anyway here they are, and one of them at least is interesting enough (psalm 124 for example, a big set of variations on psalm 130 too, which I bet could be made very attractive.)  I can't find anything on the organ online either, and for some reason I can't download the booklet to see if there is a mention of them.

In the index of the booklet the different arrangements of Lutheranian chorales are grouped according to the words of the Psalmes , e.g. Psalm 103: Nun lob, mein Seel, den Herren or Psalm 137: An Wasserflüssen Babylon. In this way the words of the Lutheranian hymn refer to the respective Psalm in the Bible (Old Testament), the former being a paraphrase of the latter.
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #604 on: January 23, 2018, 10:12:41 PM »
In the index of the booklet the different arrangements of Lutheranian chorales are grouped according to the words of the Psalmes , e.g. Psalm 103: Nun lob, mein Seel, den Herren or Psalm 137: An Wasserflüssen Babylon. In this way the words of the Lutheranian hymn refer to the respective Psalm in the Bible (Old Testament), the former being a paraphrase of the latter.

The organ sound is a bit lightweight in some of those psalmlieder  - this maybe be Christie's approach, or it may be a consequence of the organ. I think a bit more depth and power would have sounded good  in Psalm 124 / 3 for example. The music reminds me a bit of Scheidt - "Da Jesu an dem Kreuze stund" for example.

« Last Edit: January 23, 2018, 10:30:14 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #605 on: February 03, 2018, 10:29:36 AM »
I've just found out that Michel Chapuis died in November last year. I have just one recording by him which I cherish, with music by Dumage and Clerambault, and I like his Boyvin too. I vaguely recall there was someone who posted here saying how much they loved his Bach, I can't remember who. I did recently listen to some of his Leipzig Chorales and remember thinking how secular it seemed, and that in itself makes it an interesting reflection of the spirit of his times in Paris maybe. This is, after all, the 50th anniversary year of May '68!
« Last Edit: February 03, 2018, 10:40:50 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #606 on: February 03, 2018, 11:47:09 AM »
I've just found out that Michel Chapuis died in November last year. I have just one recording by him which I cherish, with music by Dumage and Clerambault, and I like his Boyvin too. I vaguely recall there was someone who posted here saying how much they loved his Bach, I can't remember who. I did recently listen to some of his Leipzig Chorales and remember thinking how secular it seemed, and that in itself makes it an interesting reflection of the spirit of his times in Paris maybe. This is, after all, the 50th anniversary year of May '68!

The Chapuis fan, you think of, is James.

IMO Chapuis' Du Mage/Clerambault CD is the best recording he ever made, far surpassing his Grigny, F. Couperin, L. Couperin, Bach and Buxtehude. I have not heard his Boyvin though.
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #607 on: February 03, 2018, 01:01:45 PM »


Well I put on his Leipzig Chorales, and around BWV 657 the thing warms up, I feel as I'm listening to Bach through the lense of Django Reinhardt and the Hot Club de France.
« Last Edit: February 03, 2018, 01:03:32 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #608 on: February 07, 2018, 12:17:02 AM »
Frescobaldi Elevation Toccata played fast on a 18th century Portugese organ with a full plenum! It goes against everything I know (not much) about historical practice, but I like it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6UozTUQfVI

Offline Elk

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Re: The Organ, Master of them all - general organ thread
« Reply #609 on: February 15, 2018, 06:34:51 PM »
I had a hankling to listen to Franck's organ music this afternoon. I thought what I wanted was one of the chorales, but it happened to be the Pièce Héroïque, not a usual choice. I listened to 5 interpretations: Germani, Guillou, Murray, Dupré, and Torvald Torén. Not surprisingly to me, the Torén swept the field.

For those of you unfamiliar with the Torén set, it was recorded in 1978 and released on the Lyricon label. It has long been my favourite recording of Franck's works. The performances range from amazing to ultimately satisfying. The recording of the organ in the 2 churches in Stockholm are in the demonstration class with true weight in the pedals, which is uncommon even in the digital age--- a bonus for those of us with full range speaker systems.

While Bach is still my alpha and omega for organ music, I urge those of you fancy Franck and have a turntable to give these recordings a try if you can source them.

There are also later recordings of Torén's Franck that are available to download (http://torvaldtoren.bluemusicgroup.com/), but I have not heard them though I plan to.

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