Author Topic: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)  (Read 59960 times)

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Offline amw

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #460 on: August 08, 2018, 03:38:56 AM »
Also if you like historical pianos, Aline Zylberajch has a disc on Ambronay on a Silbermann Cristofori replica that's not to be missed. (There are also some fortepianos in the Belder & Lester integrals but not, as far as I know, available outside the box sets)

Offline Biffo

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #461 on: August 08, 2018, 03:44:54 AM »
I haven't listened to the Horowitz recording in years.  It was the first recording of these sonatas I heard on piano and I wonder how it stands up today.

A couple of years ago DG issued a set of Horowitz's later recordings and it included some Scarlatti. The gush in the booklet said something along the lines that most pianists would give their right arms to be able to play Scarlatti like Horowitz. To me it didn't even sound like Scarlatti. I have very little Scarlatti on the piano (Michelangeli and few others), I vastly prefer it played on the harpsichord.

Offline San Antone

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #462 on: August 08, 2018, 05:51:21 AM »
Not sure if Tharaud has been mentioned, but I am listening now and enjoying it.


Offline Mandryka

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #463 on: August 08, 2018, 09:05:55 AM »
I haven't listened to the Horowitz recording in years.  It was the first recording of these sonatas I heard on piano and I wonder how it stands up today.

Interesting to compare Tipo and Horowitz in the same sonatas.
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Offline Brian

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #464 on: August 08, 2018, 12:27:17 PM »
I listened to a handful of sonatas by Carlo Granté last night. What struck me is how poised and balanced, sane, tame it sounded.  Maybe this is inevitable with modern piano. Anyway, I thought it was gross distortion of the music. Pianists should keep their mits off most of most of these sonatas!

I listened to just one, my favorite, K159. I enjoyed the way that Grante softens his touch to piano for the very last section of the sonata, ending a joyful piece on a reflective note. But I did not enjoy the way he teased tempo by momentarily speeding up or slowing down at transitions, climaxes, and ends of phrases. Overall will listen to a few others but it may not have $200 worth of appeal for me.

If you are concerned that tameness is the fate of all pianists in this music definitely try Pletnev and Sudbin and maybe Goran Filipec.

Offline amw

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #465 on: August 09, 2018, 04:40:52 AM »
I was going to say it's kind of weird to have a favourite Scarlatti sonata, but I guess I also have a favourite one (two actually, I guess I could pick one but don't know which at the moment) so I can't really judge.

Anyway as long as I'm listening to more Scarlatti on piano, if anyone has any other Scarlatti (or Soler or Seixas or whoever) fortepiano recommendations, they will certainly be read by me.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #466 on: August 09, 2018, 07:20:14 AM »
I listened to just one, my favorite, K159. I enjoyed the way that Grante softens his touch to piano for the very last section of the sonata, ending a joyful piece on a reflective note. But I did not enjoy the way he teased tempo by momentarily speeding up or slowing down at transitions, climaxes, and ends of phrases. Overall will listen to a few others but it may not have $200 worth of appeal for me.

If you are concerned that tameness is the fate of all pianists in this music definitely try Pletnev and Sudbin and maybe Goran Filipec.

Do you want the sonata played strictly?

I heard Pletnev do an all Scarlatti concert once.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2018, 07:24:31 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #467 on: August 09, 2018, 09:08:02 AM »
Here’s an imaginative 159, Sergio Vartolo, after 421

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/ErL-aWjWsCI" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/ErL-aWjWsCI</a>
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Offline Brian

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #468 on: August 09, 2018, 11:18:57 AM »
Do you want the sonata played strictly?
Not sure what you mean and also not sure how to answer as I'm still just in the early exploring days of getting into Scarlatti's idiom. But so far I have found that, among piano recordings, I've reacted best to interpreters who take liberties with dynamics and color - taking advantage of the possibilities of a piano as opposed to a harpsichord - but who are relatively strict in tempo. Even with the Vartolo video, I enjoy his ornamentation but do not enjoy his rhythmic hesitations.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #469 on: August 09, 2018, 12:12:16 PM »
Not sure what you mean and also not sure how to answer as I'm still just in the early exploring days of getting into Scarlatti's idiom. But so far I have found that, among piano recordings, I've reacted best to interpreters who take liberties with dynamics and color - taking advantage of the possibilities of a piano as opposed to a harpsichord - but who are relatively strict in tempo. Even with the Vartolo video, I enjoy his ornamentation but do not enjoy his rhythmic hesitations.

Oh I’ve just thought that you may like Alexis Weissenberg, he uses dynamics a lot, and colour a bit, and harpsichord ideas like suspensions, hesitations, hardly at all. I just compared what he does with my favourite Scarlatti pianist, someone called Enrico Baiano, in the famous sonata 481.

One thing that hesitations may do, if managed properly, is give the illusion of heartfelt, almost spontaneous expression. A sort of eloquence, like a well sung operatic recitative. In the more « strict « performances it’s more like a Mozart sonata or something.

I think part of what’s going on with me is that I am much more familiar with the toccata/fantasy idea than I am with sonatas, you know I hardly ever listen to classical or 19th century sonatas, so when I’m confronted with  a strict performance which uses colour and dynamics like Weissenberg’s,  I’ve sort of lost the sense of what the point of it is!
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #470 on: August 18, 2018, 10:50:55 PM »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline amw

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #471 on: August 18, 2018, 11:14:47 PM »
One thing that hesitations may do, if managed properly, is give the illusion of heartfelt, almost spontaneous expression. A sort of eloquence, like a well sung operatic recitative.
example:
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/wLEXbePWhsU" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/wLEXbePWhsU</a>