Author Topic: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)  (Read 142372 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline ritter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4749
  • La création du monde (Fernand Léger)
  • Location: "La Villa y Corte"
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1340 on: November 04, 2017, 02:54:09 AM »
There's also the classic recording of the Sonatine with Severino Gazzelloni and David Tudor (available in the Domaine Musical box):



Gazzelloni also recorded the piece with Frederic Rzewski (a recording I still do not know). It's avaliable on a single CD (printed on demand by ArkivMusic) or in the Sony "Masterworks of the 20th Century" box (which appears to me like a kind of hotchpotch of 20th century stuff, but does include some interesting things):

 

I actually quite enjoy the Sonatine. As has already been pointed out, it is Boulez at his most "angry young man" (and very much in line with the Première sonate in that respect) but still, the young composer keeps a tight rein (through formal restraint) on his bursts of violence.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2017, 08:39:31 AM by ritter »
Ritter
-------------------------------------------------------------
”Sólo lo difícil es estimulante; sólo la resistencia que nos reta, es capaz de enarcar, suscitar y mantener nuestra potencia de conocimiento”.

Offline snyprrr

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 11065
  • SQs, PQs, PQTs, PTs, VSs, Berlioz-Xenakis/Aperghis
  • Currently Listening to:
    Things that are crisp and spritely vs. things that are thick and creamy
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1341 on: November 04, 2017, 05:01:50 AM »
You mean this?

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/IC6FEXFaZMM" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/IC6FEXFaZMM</a>

Eek, that's painful.  Something sounds horribly out of tune.

yea, lol, the audience hears something too...

There's also the classic recording of the Sonatine with Severino Gazzelloni and David Tudor (available in the Domaine Musical box):



Gazzelloni also recorded the pece with Frederic Rzewski (a recording I still do not know). It's vaaliable on a single CD (pronted on demand by ArkivMusic) or in the Sony "Masterworks of the 20th Century" box (which appears to me like a kind of hotchpotch of 20th century stuff, but does inclde some interessing things):

 

I actually quite enjoy the Sonatine. As has already been pointed out, it is Boulez at his most "angry young man" (and very much in line with the Première sonate in that respect) but still, the young composer keeps a tight rein on his bursts of violence through formal restraint.


I also found a video of Felix Renggli(?) live, and this one I liked a little better than the live Cherrier. Perhaps a male flautist and a female pianist is the way to go here?? I know I know, but...

I still think the ending of Cherrier/Aimard sounded a bit bangy


might as well listen to Aimard's PS No.1
Rat Poison is 99% Good Food, so Follow the Money

Haydn-Sikh

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 9469
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1342 on: November 19, 2017, 06:14:14 AM »
Philippe Manoury victime du vol de ses partitions . . .  of his "re writing" of Boulez's Livre pour Quatuor. The article makes it sound really serious, like he didn't have copies.


https://www.francemusique.fr/actualite-musicale/philippe-manoury-victime-du-vol-des-partitions-de-sa-nouvelle-oeuvre-38395
« Last Edit: November 19, 2017, 06:15:55 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline ritter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4749
  • La création du monde (Fernand Léger)
  • Location: "La Villa y Corte"
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1343 on: November 21, 2017, 12:02:41 AM »
Philippe Manoury victime du vol de ses partitions . . .  of his "re writing" of Boulez's Livre pour Quatuor. The article makes it sound really serious, like he didn't have copies.


https://www.francemusique.fr/actualite-musicale/philippe-manoury-victime-du-vol-des-partitions-de-sa-nouvelle-oeuvre-38395
Well, you should never travel with anything that you cannot afford to lose... ::)

Let's hope for the best. If the manuscripts do not turn up, and even if he cannot meet the April deadline, I suppose Mr. Manoury can reconstruct his work (painstaking as that may be).
Ritter
-------------------------------------------------------------
”Sólo lo difícil es estimulante; sólo la resistencia que nos reta, es capaz de enarcar, suscitar y mantener nuestra potencia de conocimiento”.

Offline San Antone

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 6139
    • Highway 80 Stories
  • Location: Tennessee
  • Currently Listening to:
    Bach, Chopin, Liszt, Brahms, Debussy
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1344 on: December 06, 2017, 08:31:03 AM »
On Boulez:

"He created around himself a mythology of radical avant-gardism without ever really putting it into practice in his own work, at least after his early years. His prescriptive view of what was acceptable in new music, and what wasn't, was in my opinion a dead hand on French musical culture for many years. His dismissal of so many things from free improvisation to Xenakis wasn't just a matter of personal opinion but a statement with systematically accrued political clout behind it. This isn't to detract from the many impressive and memorable things he did as a composer and conductor, even if I don't feel personally very involved in most of his compositional work when I hear it. Let's celebrate his passing and that of his generation by looking forward not backward."

(Richard Barrett, 6 January 2016)

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 9469
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1345 on: December 06, 2017, 10:34:49 AM »
On Boulez:

"He created around himself a mythology of radical avant-gardism without ever really putting it into practice in his own work, at least after his early years. "

(Richard Barrett, 6 January 2016)

I wonder if people feel this is true, I have certainly heard it before. I don't feel able to judge whether favourite works of mine, like Repons or Explosante-fixe, are avant garde or not, how can you tell?
« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 10:36:53 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline San Antone

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 6139
    • Highway 80 Stories
  • Location: Tennessee
  • Currently Listening to:
    Bach, Chopin, Liszt, Brahms, Debussy
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1346 on: December 06, 2017, 10:41:11 AM »
I wonder if people feel this is true, I have certainly heard it before. I don't feel able to judge whether favourite works of mine, like Repons or Explosante-fixe, are avant garde or not, how can you tell?

Since neither of those are early works, based on his comment I would think that Barrett would not consider them avant-garde. 

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 9469
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1347 on: December 06, 2017, 10:43:24 AM »
Since neither of those are early works, based on his comment I would think that Barrett would not consider them avant-garde.

Sure, but is Barrett right? How do you tell whether something's avant garde or not?

« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 10:56:23 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline ritter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4749
  • La création du monde (Fernand Léger)
  • Location: "La Villa y Corte"
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1348 on: December 07, 2017, 08:04:59 AM »
Sure, but is Barrett right? How do you tell whether something's avant garde or not?
I'd say Mr. Barrett's comment starts from a false premise. AFAIK, Pierre Boulez was never an advocate of avant-gardism for avant-gardism's sake.

When he was at his most vociferous (the early to mid-50s), what he was promoting was a new musical language, serialism, which was (still) revolutionary at the time, and happened to be the cutting edge of the avant-garde. His own music of those years was radically avant-garde in the application of that language; it would appear that Mr. Barrett has never heard (the subsequently withdrawn) Polyphonie X, or Structures for two pianos. Le Marteau sans maître was a turning point, as in this work Boulez adopted a freer approach to his compositions, but never abandoning his adherence to the compositional principles derived from (mainly) webernian serialism. This trend continued throughout Boulez's career, I'd say, to works such as the aforementioned Répons and the late Dérive II.

If you follow Boulez's later statements, what he was particularly suspicious of was of any tendencies to revert to pre-serialist modes of expression (any neo-romanticism, minimalism, etc.). He was, usually, rather silent about younger composers, and actually on occasions rather dismissive of names such as Lachenmann and even Ferneyhough (I think, in the latter case, there was an element of personal antipathy involved).  And yet, he championed many of the composers that were becoming avant-garde, when his own music had stopped to be cutting edge. Yes, Boulez's late music was no longer avant-garde, but I think it never sought to be, but rather showed a coherent evolution from the aesthetics he was championing when his music was avant-garde (along with Stockhausen's, Nono's and so on).

Ritter
-------------------------------------------------------------
”Sólo lo difícil es estimulante; sólo la resistencia que nos reta, es capaz de enarcar, suscitar y mantener nuestra potencia de conocimiento”.

Offline San Antone

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 6139
    • Highway 80 Stories
  • Location: Tennessee
  • Currently Listening to:
    Bach, Chopin, Liszt, Brahms, Debussy
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1349 on: December 07, 2017, 08:13:14 AM »
I'd say Mr. Barrett's comment starts from a false premise. AFAIK, Pierre Boulez was never an advocate of avant-gardism for avant-gardism's sake.

When he was at his most vociferous (the early to mid-50s), what he was promoting was a new musical language, serialism, which was (still) revolutionary at the time, and happened to be the cutting edge of the avant-garde. His own music of those years was radically avant-garde in the application of that language; it would appear that Mr. Barrett has never heard (the subsequently withdrawn) Polyphonie X, or Structures for two pianos. Le Marteau sans maître was a turning point, as in this work Boulez adopted a freer approach to his compositions, but never abandoning his adherence to the compositional principles derived from (mainly) webernian serialism. This trend continued throughout Boulez's career, I'd say, to works such as the aforementioned Répons and the late Dérive II.

If you follow Boulez's later statements, what he was particularly suspicious of was of any tendencies to revert to pre-serialist modes of expression (any neo-romanticism, minimalism, etc.). He was, usually, rather silent about younger composers, and actually on occasions rather dismissive of names such as Lachenmann and even Ferneyhough (I think, in the latter case, there was an element of personal antipathy involved).  And yet, he championed many of the composers that were becoming avant-garde, when his own music had stopped to be cutting edge. Yes, Boulez's late music was no longer avant-garde, but I think it never sought to be, but rather showed a coherent evolution from the aesthetics he was championing when his music was avant-garde (along with Stockhausen's, Nono's and so on).

You make some good points, and Richard Barrett has his own axe to grind (but I don't think Barrett's comment was negative towards Boulez).  Personally, I am not concerned whether a composer's work is cutting edge, innovative or avant-garde.  Although, my impression is that Boulez set out those qualities as a measure as to how important was a composer's work, or if the work "changed the course of music history".

ComposerOfAvantGarde

  • Guest
Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1350 on: January 29, 2018, 02:00:58 PM »
Looks interesting. A world premiere of an early work by Boulez! Probably more interesting as a rare curiosity though.

http://www.ralphvanraat.nl/?p=1379

Offline ritter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4749
  • La création du monde (Fernand Léger)
  • Location: "La Villa y Corte"
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1351 on: January 30, 2018, 02:24:44 AM »
Looks interesting. A world premiere of an early work by Boulez! Probably more interesting as a rare curiosity though.

http://www.ralphvanraat.nl/?p=1379
That certainly does look interesting. It must have been around that time when the young Boulez transitioned from Honegger-infused "modernity" to full-fledged "avant-gardism". Perhaps this pre-Notations piece will shed some light on the composer's early development.
Ritter
-------------------------------------------------------------
”Sólo lo difícil es estimulante; sólo la resistencia que nos reta, es capaz de enarcar, suscitar y mantener nuestra potencia de conocimiento”.

Offline Ainsi la nuit

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 27
  • Location: Helsinki
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1352 on: April 20, 2018, 02:05:11 PM »
Some of my thoughts on Pierre Boulez

I've tried sketching this post a few times over the course of this week but for some reason I haven't been able to express my thoughts properly. How to express my admiration for this wonderful artist? Where to begin? My journey trough the life work of Pierre Boulez has simultaneously been one of artistic growth; I feel like becoming familiar with his aesthetic, his thoughts and his music making has changed me not only as a musician - listener, pianist, enthusiast - but also as a person a lot. I don't think I'm exaggerating when I say that he has been one of the biggest influences on my artistic philosophy. So I need to write this piece with the appropriate care and thoughtfulness, and hopefully I'll succeed at least to some extent.

I don't really recall my first experience of Boulez. Upon trying really hard to remember, I think I managed to conjure up some memories of a teenage version of me bumping into the classic Pollini recording of the 2nd piano sonata and being thoroughly confused, baffled and probably even infuriated by what I heard. To me it wasn't music, and thus not worthy of my attention. It took me a few years before I was familiar enough with some of the basic characteristics of modernism that I could start finding my way into his world.

Meanwhile, Boulez-the-conductor kept popping up increasingly frequently as I started delving deeper into the realm of 20th century music and beyond. I've described elsewhere how hearing Schoenberg's sole Piano Concerto (Op. 42) was a massive bombshell that shook my entire musical thinking - and by chance (or maybe it played an instrumental role in the big impression, who knows...) Boulez was the conductor in the recording that I first heard. That's when I really thought to myself: who is this man? And slowly, but with ever-growing hunger, I started to go through his recordings as a conductor. I cannot over-emphasize what an effect that project had one me. I discovered so much music with which I had had very little or no contact before: Mahler, Bartók, Stravinsky, Berg, Schoenberg, Webern, Messiaen, Ligeti... The list goes on and on. There were also the likes of Carter, Berio, Varèse, Birtwistle and many more. The burning fire this man had for modernist and contemporary music was so immense that I could not help but fall in love with all of it. He was often criticized for not playing enough earlier music, but that was exactly what drew me closer to him. There were so many people concentrating on the music of the old masters - whom I love dearly! - that seeing someone with so much love for later music was very refreshing.

To this day he remains my favourite conductor. One of my biggest regrets is never witnessing his work live, but I'm too young for that anyway; and besides, he left an absolutely massive recorded legacy - a lot of which I still haven't heard - so I'm not really in a position to complain. I don't always love his interpretations, but I do find them very interesting most of the time and always thought-provoking. Absolute clarity, subtlety and restraint (in the most positive meaning of the word) - these qualities of Boulez makes him feel like a glass of cold water among countless hand-temperature ones. What a legacy!

But what about his music? That took me much, much longer to grasp. His music is very complex, there's no denying that. I had to listen to a lot of modern music (especially that which was close to him as a conductor) in order to decipher his language. It was a lot of work, but I'm endlessly grateful that I did it because his music is now very close to my heart and it keeps reveling more secrets even after years of familiarity.

The first piece that truly grabbed me was the 12 notations for piano from his younger years. The second piece of the set, with those massive glissandi and ticking rhythmic passages, made a huge impact. The rest of the set intrigued me as well, and I started to wonder: maybe it's time to attempt this composer again, after all these years, and possibly without trying the second sonata just yet since it intimidated me so much on my first attempt? I started approaching his body of works slowly. The next piece that made a strong impression was the fabulous Sonatine for piano and flute. The admittedly harsh language felt nevertheless communicative - there was something about the serial idiom that made sense now, the pieces of the metaphorical puzzle started to fall into place. I'd say these two early pieces had a very important part to play in my journey into Boulez's work.

After that I jumped to the "deep end" in some ways, since I next tackled his longest score, the immense Pli selon pli for soprano and orchestra. I think by now it was clear that his language had become more ingrained in my ears, since the work really didn't feel that difficult. It is a very complex score, sure, and definitely a huge challenge for the performers, but overall the expression it channeled was one of poise and sensuality. I loved the soaring soprano lines, and the long orchestral passages that seemed to open up pathways to countless directions that I could follow in whichever order I wanted. The composer and conductor Matthias Pintscher once said of the work that Boulez in this work takes us by the hand and leads us to a wonderful garden where we can wander around freely and endlessly discover new things. I quite like that. One of my big dreams is to hear Barbara Hannigan's rendition of this piece; she toured it with Boulez in 2011 (if my memory serves me) and she has an exceptional skill in presenting complex contemporary scores. I wonder if there's a recording of their interpretation in some shady archive somewhere...

The two iterations of Anthèmes for violin solo was also an important discovery. I heard the second one first, and the first one some time after. Boulez expands the piece to almost twice the original length, and adds an electronic element that amplifies, mutates and throws some of the violin's passages back at the violinist. The end result is simply stunning in its sonic power, and it's a work that I would love to hear live one day. The first version, for solo violin, is also a fascinating piece and an important addition to the solo violin repertoire. Both pieces give me an impression of subtle finesse; there's something almost noble about the way Boulez twists and turns the violin line in the most wonderful ways. It's a well-known fact that he was preparing a third version of the work which would have been a full-fledged violin concerto for none other than Anne-Sophie Mutter, but this plan never came to fruition. What a terrible shame!

I cannot not mention my deep love for the fun little Messagesquisse which Boulez wrote for Rostropovich. It's scored for a solo cellist with six additional cellists to spice things up a little. I think Rostropovich once commented that it's a genius piece, but very challenging to play. Nevertheless, there are many worthy recordings available today, and the piece seems to pose little challenge to dedicated cellists today. When performed well it can be a great and thrilling experience, and I always recommend it to anyone wanting to discover Boulez's work as a composer. An easy start, so to say.

My personal favourite among Boulez's works is the combo of Incises and Sur incises, both of which I've discovered only fairly recently. This is the essential Boulez for me. The sonic imagination he was able to conjure up in these works is simply astonishing. Most people probably know Sur incises better, but I think there's a case to be made for the earlier, solo piano version too. Tamara Stefanovich once called it a "21st century neurotic toccata" and I simply love that description; it's an energetic tour-de-force for the pianist, full of virtuosity (which Boulez loved to include in his piano works!) and cascades of notes. That being said, the much longer later version adds more pianos, harps and a wonderful selection of percussion instruments, and the effect this instrumentation has on the music is brilliant. The music feels urban to me - and not in the contemporary-music-describes-the-modern-chaotic-life kind of way (a silly cliché often used to describe contemporary scores) but in a refined, intelligent and beautiful way. This is music of an old, cosmopolitan man. And I love it so much.

There so much music I'd like to ramble on and on about, but this post is becoming terribly long so I'll try not to include all of my favourites. But how could one not mention the classic Le marteau sans maître, or Répons, or Rituel? Even the piano sonatas, music that freaked me out so much as a teenager, have grown on me years later. Surprisingly, I listened to the orchestral versions of the Notations only last year, and I loved them very much. Hearing those early favourites in a completely new context made me feel almost nostalgic for a time that wasn't even that long ago. Not merely arrangements, they are brilliant expansions of his youthful, humorous pieces. What a shame that he only managed to do this treatment to five of them, but let's be grateful for what we have. In an interview he was once asked if he agrees that the orchestral rethinking could be seen as a kind of Sur notations, to which he happily agreed, with a characteristic grin.

To me, Boulez is one of the most important composers and conductors of the 20th and 21st centuries - and certainly one of my personal favourites. His music is fearlessly modern, but it's never just for the sake of confusing the audience. Especially in his later years he became quite a mellow man, actually. He held some very strong opinions, some of which I agree with and some not, but the fact remains that he was a great creator of music, and in addition, he did a huge service as a conductor to a lot of composers he felt strongly for. Like Simon Rattle once said, he changed the way we hear the music of some composers - and I wholeheartedly agree!

A big thank you for anyone who read all of this. I really do not intend my posts to be this long but sometimes there are just so many thoughts to jot down.

Offline arpeggio

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 454
  • Location: Burke, Virginia, USA
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1353 on: April 20, 2018, 02:23:16 PM »
^^^^^
Although not a great fan of Boulez the composer I really enjoyed reading your post  ;)

This is one of the aspects I like about this forum.  A person can convey his appreciation of the adventurous composers of the 20th century.  You have provided me with a great deal of food for thought.

In another forum one of the knuckleheads who thinks classical music died in 1911 started a thread asking if composers who composed modern music like Webern, Xenakis, Boulez, i. e. were actually musical  ???

Even though some of us were critical of his hypothesis, what was sad was the number of members who supported his observations.

Many years ago when I was much younger I saw Boulez conducting The Right of Spring with the Cleveland Symphony when he was just starting out as a conductor.  It was funny that he was conducting from one of these small study scores.

Offline aleazk

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 220
    • My stuff
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1354 on: April 20, 2018, 03:13:29 PM »
@Ainsi la nuit: great post and very relatable; my experience with him is/was very similar to yours. Cheers!  :)

Offline Mahlerian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2811
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1355 on: April 20, 2018, 03:59:19 PM »
Some of my thoughts on Pierre Boulez

...

A big thank you for anyone who read all of this. I really do not intend my posts to be this long but sometimes there are just so many thoughts to jot down.

Thanks for sharing!

My own personal experience of Boulez as composer grew through his orchestral Notations, particularly the shimmering stillness of No. 7.
"l do not consider my music as atonal, but rather as non-tonal. I feel the unity of all keys. Atonal music by modern composers admits of no key at all, no feeling of any definite center." - Arnold Schoenberg

Offline ritter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4749
  • La création du monde (Fernand Léger)
  • Location: "La Villa y Corte"
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1356 on: April 20, 2018, 10:38:11 PM »
Beautiful post, Ainsi la nuit! A pleasure to read...

Just as in your case, for me Boulez “has been one of the biggest influences on my artistic philosophy”. His work has accompanied me for more than 40 years now. First as a conductor (my dad gave me his recording of Parsifal as a present, yielding to my teenage Wagnerian obsession), and then as a composer (my first exposure to his music having been excerpts of Le marteau on—of all places—the entertainment system on an Air France flight from Paris to Caracas in 1977). I was blown away in both cases, and since then I’m grateful to him not only for his intensely beautiful music and his outstanding recordings, but also for having opened so many doors (not only musical) to new territories for me.

I did have the chance to see him live several times, from the Ring in Bayreuth in 1979 to Mahler’s Sixth in Berlin in 2008), and saw him conduct his own music on more than one occasion (Livre pour cordes, Le marteau, Répons, Le soleil des eaux, Notations I-IV....), and each time was a memorable one.

Thanks again for a great post, and best regards,
« Last Edit: April 21, 2018, 07:35:41 AM by ritter »
Ritter
-------------------------------------------------------------
”Sólo lo difícil es estimulante; sólo la resistencia que nos reta, es capaz de enarcar, suscitar y mantener nuestra potencia de conocimiento”.

ComposerOfAvantGarde

  • Guest
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1357 on: June 12, 2018, 10:34:46 PM »
I found this today. Posted on youtube a couple of months ago. I haven't listened to it yet, but I might be interesting to hear an alternative to the Pintscher and Boulez performances.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/nYpjQsN4w1E" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/nYpjQsN4w1E</a>

The design of the concert hall is indeed very unfortunate.

Offline Uhor

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 112
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1358 on: June 18, 2018, 04:34:46 PM »
There is really no living figure, with such fire and intellect, willing to destroy and rebuild music again.

I feel we are in a stagnation period despite all the technological advances and multitude of styles.

ComposerOfAvantGarde

  • Guest
Re: Pierre Boulez (1925-2016)
« Reply #1359 on: June 18, 2018, 04:38:03 PM »
There is really no living figure, with such fire and intellect, willing to destroy and rebuild music again.

I feel we are in a stagnation period despite all the technological advances and multitude of styles.
No, actually, Boulez wasn't one willing to destroy and rebuild. He took inspiration from the past and helped to build and nurture the future from there. If we are in a stagnation period, it seems bizarre that Boulez supported and conducted the works of composers who are prominent today like Olga Neuwirth, Isabel Mundry, or still relatively 'upcoming' like Helen Grime and Ondrej Adamek. Not to mention IRCAM and EIC.....

Intellect, yes but almost disdainful of intellect.
Fire, maybe, but not for the majority of his career beyond an angsty youngster.