Author Topic: Langgaard's Lyre  (Read 61852 times)

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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #500 on: May 12, 2017, 04:45:14 AM »
There is a lesson in there  8)
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #501 on: May 12, 2017, 05:00:53 AM »
I thought you really meant all the Dacapo recordings. And yes, there's not great need to have those, too... because the Nightingales are every bit as good and better as far as a qualitative standard is concerned. More a question whether one likes these works so much that one wants to have more than one interpretations. This tends to be the GMG habit. :-) Few are content with just the Takacs set of the Beethoven Quartets, although it is so excellent.

No argument here. I agree.
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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #502 on: June 02, 2017, 04:27:17 AM »
"Such attitudes brought Langgard into conflict with the European mainstream after World War I ...."

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Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Online North Star

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #503 on: December 05, 2017, 07:33:32 AM »
Okay, kids, gather around:

. . . Langgaard’s very first string quartet, which the composer began at the age of 21 in 1914.  Like the subsequent quartets it is shot through with moving musical references to the fateful summer the year before, when the composer met the (hopeless) love of his life.

Now, I come away from that sentence asking, What – all of his string quartets are shot through with musical references to the summer of 1913?

That’s how the sentence is cast, right?

Edit :: minor typo
Quoth the liner notes:
Quote from: Bendt Viinholt Nielsen, from Nightingale Quartet's Langgaard String Quartets vol. 3 liner notes pp 10-11
In 1913 the 20-year-old Langgaard spent the summer in the small spa town of Kyrkhult in Blekinge, Sweden, where he lodged in a house called 'Rosengården' (The Rose Garden). The two-month stay there was to have lifelong significance for the composer - first and foremost, we must believe, because he met and fell in love with a girl, a certain Dora, whose identity is unknown today. The young Langgaard was immediately emotionally awakened, and over the next 5-6 years he created a wealth of songs, piano and chamber music works whose texts, titles and musical substance refer to the memorable days at Rosengården. This is true not least of the four string quartets which were all called Rosengaardsspil (Rose Garden Play). Later, though, three of them were given other titles. The first of these four 'Rose Garden Quartets' is String Quartet no. 1 (1914-15); then come Rosengaardsspil (1918), String Quartet (A major) (1918); and finally Quartet no. 6 (1918-19).
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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #504 on: December 05, 2017, 07:37:59 AM »
Thanks!  And, you know, I might have set down to read the notes, myself . . . .
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #505 on: January 27, 2018, 01:37:52 AM »
Hello all - just a question I had posed in the WAYLTN thread but perhaps might be more appropriate here - what sort of relationship did Langgaard have with Nielsen and was there any evidence of a flow of ideas between the 2?.
Listening to both Composers at the moment and it seems to me like there may have been a bit of appropriation of Nielsen's work by Langgaard but perhaps I'm mistaken and it was the other way round?.
I read here (posted by Vandermolen) that Langgaard was a bit resentful towards Nielsen - any truth in that?. :)

Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #506 on: January 27, 2018, 02:57:01 AM »
Hello all - just a question I had posed in the WAYLTN thread but perhaps might be more appropriate here - what sort of relationship did Langgaard have with Nielsen and was there any evidence of a flow of ideas between the 2?.
Listening to both Composers at the moment and it seems to me like there may have been a bit of appropriation of Nielsen's work by Langgaard but perhaps I'm mistaken and it was the other way round?.
I read here (posted by Vandermolen) that Langgaard was a bit resentful towards Nielsen - any truth in that?. :)

There was very little flow from Nielsen to Langgaard and zero the other way; Nielsen was THE dominant figure of Danish Music and Langgaard was actively ignored after his early success in Berlin. Langgaard eventually came to resent Nielsen's ubiquity in Danish musical life -- even and especially after Nielsen was already dead -- and penned a devastating little ditty for organ and chorus: "Carl Nielsen, Our Great Composer" -- a facetious hymn to those, and only those, words... to be repeated "ad infinitum". (Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N93OXGkzUmo)

(it's been called "catchy doggerel", which is probably plenty praise for something intended as pure throw-away sarcasm.)

That said, Langgaard could not have NOT been influenced to SOME degree by Nielsen, since the latter was everywhere a Danish person looked, at the time. But perhaps not on purpose. And certainly, Langgaard was plenty original (some might say: too original -- I don't agree; I love his outlandishness) that the occasional rhyming bit in his work isn't per se indicative of leaning on Nielsen.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #507 on: January 27, 2018, 02:58:16 AM »
Hello all - just a question I had posed in the WAYLTN thread but perhaps might be more appropriate here - what sort of relationship did Langgaard have with Nielsen and was there any evidence of a flow of ideas between the 2?.
Listening to both Composers at the moment and it seems to me like there may have been a bit of appropriation of Nielsen's work by Langgaard but perhaps I'm mistaken and it was the other way round?.
I read here (posted by Vandermolen) that Langgaard was a bit resentful towards Nielsen - any truth in that?. :)

 Langgaard wrote a work sarcastically titled 'Carl Nielsen, Our Great Composer' designed to be 'repeated throughout eternity'. At one level he seems to have resented Nielsen's status as the Great Danish Composer but, paradoxically, his work clearly shows the influence of Nielsen, especially, in the works I know, Symphony 4, 5 and 6. So,maybe his relationship to Nielsen was a bit 'love/hate' but others may disagree.

PS my post crossed with the one by 'SuprisedByBeauty'.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).


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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #509 on: January 27, 2018, 04:37:35 AM »
There was very little flow from Nielsen to Langgaard and zero the other way; Nielsen was THE dominant figure of Danish Music and Langgaard was actively ignored after his early success in Berlin. Langgaard eventually came to resent Nielsen's ubiquity in Danish musical life -- even and especially after Nielsen was already dead -- and penned a devastating little ditty for organ and chorus: "Carl Nielsen, Our Great Composer" -- a facetious hymn to those, and only those, words... to be repeated "ad infinitum". (Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N93OXGkzUmo)

(it's been called "catchy doggerel", which is probably plenty praise for something intended as pure throw-away sarcasm.)

That said, Langgaard could not have NOT been influenced to SOME degree by Nielsen, since he was everywhere a Danish person looked, at the time. But perhaps not on purpose. And certainly, Langgaard was plenty original (some might say: too original -- I don't agree; I love his outlandishness) that the occasional rhyming bit in his work isn't per se indicative of leaning on Nielsen.
Langgaard wrote a work sarcastically titled 'Carl Nielsen, Our Great Composer' designed to be 'repeated throughout eternity'. At one level he seems to have resented Nielsen's status as the Great Danish Composer but, paradoxically, his work clearly shows the influence of Nielsen, especially, in the works I know, Symphony 4, 5 and 6. So,maybe his relationship to Nielsen was a bit 'love/hate' but others may disagree.

PS my post crossed with the one by 'SuprisedByBeauty'.

Thanks for your replies - I can see how Langgaard could have unwittingly  been influenced by Nielsen and it makes sense that he may have had a love/hate thing going on with his work. :)

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #510 on: January 27, 2018, 06:57:35 AM »
I can only nod my head along with Jens’ and Jeffrey’s posts. I will add that sometimes when one composer is trying to distance themselves from another composer, this is, basically, a form of influence since the composer that’s doing the distancing is well-aware of the sound-world that the other composer’s music inhabits.
“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #511 on: January 27, 2018, 08:58:33 PM »
I can only nod my head along with Jens’ and Jeffrey’s posts. I will add that sometimes when one composer is trying to distance themselves from another composer, this is, basically, a form of influence since the composer that’s doing the distancing is well-aware of the sound-world that the other composer’s music inhabits.

For sure MI. :)

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #512 on: March 12, 2018, 06:13:35 AM »
My copy of Symphony No. 1 (DNRSO/Segerstam) arrived today, and I'm listening to it now. I can kind of see how some people might find it too much, but for me there's no such thing as "too much". I absolutely love this work! A great addition to my collection of epic B minor symphonies, along with the likes of Gliere 3 and Paderewski.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #513 on: March 12, 2018, 06:26:46 AM »
Wonderful symphony!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #514 on: March 12, 2018, 08:36:07 AM »
My copy of Symphony No. 1 (DNRSO/Segerstam) arrived today, and I'm listening to it now. I can kind of see how some people might find it too much, but for me there's no such thing as "too much". I absolutely love this work! A great addition to my collection of epic B minor symphonies, along with the likes of Gliere 3 and Paderewski.

Powerful purchase. It's not less than gorgeously epic! I can't get enough of that symphony either. That is the best recording of that work IMHO.

Offline J.Z. Herrenberg

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #515 on: March 12, 2018, 09:02:20 AM »
Yes, Segerstam has the measure of this very long symphony. Love it.
Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything. -- Plato

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #516 on: March 12, 2018, 05:22:26 PM »
I tend to like Langgaard’s more condensed works like his Symphony No. 6, “Det Himmelrivende”, which gets my vote as one of his best symphonies. I also like that screwy, little hairball Symphony No. 11, “Ixion”, but also Symphony No. 4, “Løvfald”. Outside of the symphonies, I absolutely adore his string quartets and that kaleidoscopic whirlwind of ‘future music’, Sfærernes Musik. I’ve been meaning to check out his piano music and more of his chamber music like the violin sonatas for example.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2018, 05:37:02 PM by Mirror Image »
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #517 on: March 13, 2018, 12:29:45 AM »
I tend to like Langgaard’s more condensed works like his Symphony No. 6, “Det Himmelrivende”, which gets my vote as one of his best symphonies. I also like that screwy, little hairball Symphony No. 11, “Ixion”, but also Symphony No. 4, “Løvfald”. Outside of the symphonies, I absolutely adore his string quartets and that kaleidoscopic whirlwind of ‘future music’, Sfærernes Musik. I’ve been meaning to check out his piano music and more of his chamber music like the violin sonatas for example.

Nos. 4,5, 6 and 10 are my favourites plus Music of the Spheres. I must listen to No.1 again.
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Offline cilgwyn

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #518 on: March 31, 2018, 03:33:24 AM »
On,now! After twiddling my finger's through Flotow's Martha  :-\ and quite enjoying Rimsky Korsakov's Sadko (magnificent,old school Russian singing under Golovanov;albeit rough sound!) this is just full of imaginative ideas. Allot of it is very beautiful,exciting,and a bit mind (and ear) boggling to listen to. You don't need a libretto to enjoy it. Langgaard always seems to come second to Nielsen,when comparisons are made;but isn't there a case for this being,some kind of,eccentric masterpiece?!! Whether it is,or not;I find it an astonishing work. I can't think of anything quite like it. Yet,it seems to "work"!



I hate to say this;knowing the possible impact on bank balances ;D......but it strikes me that this wild,wacky and thoroughly extraordinary work (I've never heard anything else,quite like it!) is another opera that vandermolen might possibly enjoy?!! I wouldn't even compare it what anyone would normally regard as a opera. It's more like some kind of huge tone poem,with bit's of operatic singing,in some ways. The sound world is very reminiscent,to my ears,of some of the more "visionary" symphonies;particularly No's 4-6 (and maybe,No 10,as well). And a bit of his Music of the Spheres,maybe,thrown in?!! Some of the sounds (including shouting,pounding percussion,organ on full throttle,bells!!) really are,sonically,thrilling! Absolutely,Wow!! ??? ??? ???

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #519 on: March 31, 2018, 03:47:30 AM »
On,now! After twiddling my finger's through Flotow's Martha  :-\ and quite enjoying Rimsky Korsakov's Sadko (magnificent,old school Russian singing under Golovanov;albeit rough sound!) this is just full of imaginative ideas. Allot of it is very beautiful,exciting,and a bit mind (and ear) boggling to listen to. You don't need a libretto to enjoy it. Langgaard always seems to come second to Nielsen,when comparisons are made;but isn't there a case for this being,some kind of,eccentric masterpiece?!! Whether it is,or not;I find it an astonishing work. I can't think of anything quite like it. Yet,it seems to "work"!



I hate to say this;knowing the possible impact on bank balances ;D......but it strikes me that this wild,wacky and thoroughly extraordinary work (I've never heard anything else,quite like it!) is another opera that vandermolen might possibly enjoy?!! I wouldn't even compare it what anyone would normally regard as a opera. It's more like some kind of huge tone poem,with bit's of operatic singing,in some ways. The sound world is very reminiscent,to my ears,of some of the more "visionary" symphonies;particularly No's 4-6 (and maybe,No 10,as well). And a bit of his Music of the Spheres,maybe,thrown in?!! Some of the sounds (including shouting,pounding percussion,organ on full throttle,bells!!) really are,sonically,thrilling! Absolutely,Wow!! ??? ??? ???

You are wicked cilgwyn to keep throwing these temptations my way.  ;D
It does look of interest and I am an admirer of Langgaard's music. However I think I must get my head round Martinu's 'Greek Passion' first.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).