Author Topic: Langgaard's Lyre  (Read 46209 times)

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Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #500 on: May 12, 2017, 05:28:44 AM »
All of those Langgaard SQ recordings on Dacapo are exquisite.

Indeed they are, the Kontra Quartet's included... except they are only available digitally now.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #501 on: May 12, 2017, 05:30:10 AM »
Indeed they are, the Kontra Quartet's included... except they are only available digitally now.

I haven’t heard the Kontra’s Langgaard, but, after hearing the Nightingale Quartet’s performances, I’m afraid I don’t really have any desire to. They’re that good.
"In the next world, I shan't be doing music, with all the striving and disappointments. I shall be being it.” - Ralph Vaughan Williams

Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #502 on: May 12, 2017, 05:34:39 AM »
I haven’t heard the Kontra’s Langgaard, but, after hearing the Nightingale Quartet’s performances, I’m afraid I don’t really have any desire to. They’re that good.

I thought you really meant all the Dacapo recordings. And yes, there's not a great need to have those, too... because the Nightingales are every bit as good and better as far as a qualitative standard is concerned. More a question whether one likes these works so much that one wants to have more than one interpretation. This tends to be the GMG habit. :-) Few are content with just the Takacs set of the Beethoven Quartets, although it is so excellent.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #503 on: May 12, 2017, 05:45:14 AM »
There is a lesson in there  8)
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
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His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #504 on: May 12, 2017, 06:00:53 AM »
I thought you really meant all the Dacapo recordings. And yes, there's not great need to have those, too... because the Nightingales are every bit as good and better as far as a qualitative standard is concerned. More a question whether one likes these works so much that one wants to have more than one interpretations. This tends to be the GMG habit. :-) Few are content with just the Takacs set of the Beethoven Quartets, although it is so excellent.

No argument here. I agree.
"In the next world, I shan't be doing music, with all the striving and disappointments. I shall be being it.” - Ralph Vaughan Williams

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #505 on: June 02, 2017, 05:27:17 AM »
"Such attitudes brought Langgard into conflict with the European mainstream after World War I ...."

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Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Online North Star

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #506 on: December 05, 2017, 07:33:32 AM »
Okay, kids, gather around:

. . . Langgaard’s very first string quartet, which the composer began at the age of 21 in 1914.  Like the subsequent quartets it is shot through with moving musical references to the fateful summer the year before, when the composer met the (hopeless) love of his life.

Now, I come away from that sentence asking, What – all of his string quartets are shot through with musical references to the summer of 1913?

That’s how the sentence is cast, right?

Edit :: minor typo
Quoth the liner notes:
Quote from: Bendt Viinholt Nielsen, from Nightingale Quartet's Langgaard String Quartets vol. 3 liner notes pp 10-11
In 1913 the 20-year-old Langgaard spent the summer in the small spa town of Kyrkhult in Blekinge, Sweden, where he lodged in a house called 'Rosengården' (The Rose Garden). The two-month stay there was to have lifelong significance for the composer - first and foremost, we must believe, because he met and fell in love with a girl, a certain Dora, whose identity is unknown today. The young Langgaard was immediately emotionally awakened, and over the next 5-6 years he created a wealth of songs, piano and chamber music works whose texts, titles and musical substance refer to the memorable days at Rosengården. This is true not least of the four string quartets which were all called Rosengaardsspil (Rose Garden Play). Later, though, three of them were given other titles. The first of these four 'Rose Garden Quartets' is String Quartet no. 1 (1914-15); then come Rosengaardsspil (1918), String Quartet (A major) (1918); and finally Quartet no. 6 (1918-19).
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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #507 on: December 05, 2017, 07:37:59 AM »
Thanks!  And, you know, I might have set down to read the notes, myself . . . .
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

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