Author Topic: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)  (Read 57891 times)

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Offline (: premont :)

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Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« on: September 18, 2007, 10:58:57 AM »

Complete keyboard sonatas of Domenico Scarlatti by Pieter-Jan Belder (36 CD's)



Recently I acquired the first two vol.s (á 3 CDs) of Belder´s on-going Scarlatti set. This is nothing less than a relevation, because Belder´s interpretations are much more human and reflective than Scott Ross´, and Belder accordingly finds more depth in these works than Scott Ross, who in these ears often is too efficient (read: superficial). Certainly Scarlatti´s Sonatas demand brilliant keyboard technique, but Belder is completely up to Ross in this matter. So I am afraid, that the Belder box is a "must have".
« Last Edit: January 03, 2012, 11:03:22 PM by ~ Que ~ »
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Harry

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2007, 11:34:59 AM »
Recently I acquired the first two vol.s (á 3 CDs) of Belder´s on-going Scarlatti set. This is nothing less than a relevation, because Belder´s interpretations are much more human and reflective than Scott Ross´, and Belder accordingly finds more depth in these works than Scott Ross, who in these ears often is too efficient (read: superficial). Certainly Scarlatti´s Sonatas demand brilliant keyboard technique, but Belder is completely up to Ross in this matter. So I am afraid, that the Belder box is a "must have".

Finally somebody thinking this also. I have been screaming against the roofs how good this was, but nobody did give a damn. I am glad you like it Premont.

Offline Josquin des Prez

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2007, 07:13:15 PM »
because Belder´s interpretations are much more human and reflective than Scott Ross

Good to know. I think i'll stick to the Ross then. I'm not sure i can handle Scarlatti in such an anachronistic (and should i say, impertinent) guise.

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2007, 10:03:02 AM »
Good to know. I think i'll stick to the Ross then. I'm not sure i can handle Scarlatti in such an anachronistic (and should i say, impertinent) guise.

Nothing but your opinion, and I am happy, that I don´t share it.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2007, 10:06:33 AM by premont »
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2007, 10:22:51 AM »
Finally somebody thinking this also. I have been screaming against the roofs how good this was, but nobody did give a damn. I am glad you like it Premont.

And it was indeed your insistent recommandation, which prompted me to investigate Belders Scarlatti. Thanks.
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline rubio

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2008, 11:17:59 PM »
By some, these sonatas are considered among the pinnacles of classical music, and I have not heard any of this music. When it comes to Bach I (so far) prefer to hear his work on harpsichord rather than piano. I guess I will have to try both also with Scarlatti. Can you recommend some top-notch Scarlatti recital discs. Would e.g. this one be a good introduction for piano?

“One good thing about music, when it hits- you feel no pain” Bob Marley

Offline XB-70 Valkyrie

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2008, 11:30:54 PM »
Michelangeli's are superb (available on the Membran 10 CD set). Or watch here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QXHUIpNCu2k

On harpsichord, Ralph Kirkpatrick is certainly worth a listen, in part because he is considered the grandfather of modern D. Scarlatti scholarship.
If you really dislike Bach you keep quiet about it! - Andras Schiff

Offline Holden

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2008, 11:51:37 PM »
By some, these sonatas are considered among the pinnacles of classical music, and I have not heard any of this music. When it comes to Bach I (so far) prefer to hear his work on harpsichord rather than piano. I guess I will have to try both also with Scarlatti. Can you recommend some top-notch Scarlatti recital discs. Would e.g. this one be a good introduction for piano?



This is an absolutely great recording, Sudbin has the knack of bringing a fesh approach to what he plays. On top of that I'd highly recommend the following

Babayan from Propiano



Horowitz from Sony



Zacharias from EMI



Tomsic



..and di Bonoventura



The Babayan, Horowitz, Tomsic and Sudbin are superb. There are others who don't have complete CDs such as Haskil, Gilels and Perahia who are also worth listening to

Cheers

Holden

Offline FideLeo

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2008, 11:54:29 PM »
Try Scarlatti on a Cristofori fortepiano, the instrument for which many of the sonatas were probably written. 

http://www.denzilwraight.com/Zylberajch.htm
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline rubio

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #9 on: February 29, 2008, 12:17:21 AM »
Thanks for many interesting recommendations! Has anybody here heard this cheap CD:



Or Marcelle Meyer:

« Last Edit: February 29, 2008, 12:32:12 AM by rubio »
“One good thing about music, when it hits- you feel no pain” Bob Marley

Offline FideLeo

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #10 on: February 29, 2008, 02:42:48 AM »
Thanks for many interesting recommendations! Has anybody here heard this cheap CD:



Or Marcelle Meyer:



I have both and would give my nod to Meyer for what it is (Scarlatti played
romantically on a romantic-style piano).
« Last Edit: February 29, 2008, 02:45:12 AM by fl.traverso »
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline rubio

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #11 on: February 29, 2008, 03:01:42 AM »
I have both and would give my nod to Meyer for what it is (Scarlatti played
romantically on a romantic-style piano).

Does the Meyer include the 1947 or the 1953-55 recordings of these sonatas?
“One good thing about music, when it hits- you feel no pain” Bob Marley

Offline dirkronk

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #12 on: February 29, 2008, 05:59:39 AM »
The only option I would add to Holden's superb recommendations--and mainly for historical interest and perspective--would be the ancient Landowska.

Enjoy!

Dirk

Offline vanessa_zang

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #13 on: February 29, 2008, 06:03:54 AM »
I like Pogorelich on piano in Scarlatti, as well as Michalangeli. (And I prefer Scarlatti over Bach and piano over harpsichord.)
« Last Edit: February 29, 2008, 06:05:53 AM by vanessa_zang »

Offline Josquin des Prez

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #14 on: February 29, 2008, 06:24:29 AM »

Don

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #15 on: February 29, 2008, 06:29:40 AM »
By some, these sonatas are considered among the pinnacles of classical music, and I have not heard any of this music. When it comes to Bach I (so far) prefer to hear his work on harpsichord rather than piano. I guess I will have to try both also with Scarlatti. Can you recommend some top-notch Scarlatti recital discs. Would e.g. this one be a good introduction for piano?




The Sudbin is a wonderful disc.  If you prefer Bach on harpsichord, you'll likely prefer Scarlatti on harpsichord.

Offline ragman1970

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #16 on: February 29, 2008, 06:32:58 AM »
Pogorelich is missing!

Offline vanessa_zang

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #17 on: February 29, 2008, 06:34:22 AM »
Pogorelich is missing!

Ha! I mentioned him!

Offline ragman1970

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #18 on: February 29, 2008, 06:38:51 AM »
Ha! I mentioned him!

Sorry, my faultSomeone mentioned Demidenko?
Different approch as Sudbin or Pogorelich, not so colorful and warm, but great pianism. (both recording!!!)


Offline Todd

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #19 on: February 29, 2008, 06:47:00 AM »
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations