Author Topic: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)  (Read 63051 times)

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sidoze

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #20 on: February 29, 2008, 07:44:07 AM »
as well as Michalangeli.

There are some fascinating videos on Youtube of a young Michelangeli playing Scarlatti.

Quote
(And I prefer Scarlatti over Bach and piano over harpsichord.)

Have you heard Rameau on piano? It's wonderful too.

Offline alkan

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #21 on: February 29, 2008, 09:00:29 AM »
Try this for a harpsichord version !!!



Pierre Hantai is dynamite in some of these sonates !!!        Must be heard to be believed.     Excellent CD .... one of my favourites.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2009, 10:15:05 PM by Que »
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BorisG

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #22 on: February 29, 2008, 10:13:00 AM »
In addition to the many splendid piano recommendations.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2008, 01:04:11 AM by Que »

Don

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #23 on: February 29, 2008, 10:26:04 AM »
The Scherbakov/Naxos disc is one of my least enjoyable Scarlatti recordings.  I find him lacking the joy of the major key sonatas as well as the intensity of sadness of the three programmed minor key works.  However, I have to admit that my view is a minority one.

Offline orbital

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #24 on: February 29, 2008, 10:39:12 AM »
Try Scarlatti on a Cristofori fortepiano, the instrument for which many of the sonatas were probably written. 

http://www.denzilwraight.com/Zylberajch.htm
Her playing is not very playful, but I still enjoy that recording a lot. Good choice of sonatas there, too.

sidoze

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #25 on: February 29, 2008, 10:43:19 AM »
However, I have to admit that my view is a minority one.

not really. the problem with this board is that whenever someone asks for a recommendation, every available CD gets posted. makes the whole thing rather pointless.

Offline rubio

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #26 on: February 29, 2008, 10:48:15 AM »
not really. the problem with this board is that whenever someone asks for a recommendation, every available CD gets posted. makes the whole thing rather pointless.

After a while you know which posters you have common taste with, and more likely pay attention to their advices.
“One good thing about music, when it hits- you feel no pain” Bob Marley

Offline vanessa_zang

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #27 on: February 29, 2008, 10:52:27 AM »
not really. the problem with this board is that whenever someone asks for a recommendation, every available CD gets posted. makes the whole thing rather pointless.

True. That is why it is important to know the tastes and knowledge level (size of collection also counts sometimes because if you only have 30 CDs...). For instance, I know Paul reads your posts on piano recordings, Edward for modern music, etc.

My least favorite posts are ones in which someone asks for recommendations of piano concerto and someone just put up a list of 500 piano concertos with no other comments. That just seems like showing off, and it is really just copy and paste.

Well, I am not qualified to say much in matters about music, really. Just my feelings, that's all.

BorisG

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #28 on: February 29, 2008, 12:47:58 PM »
The Scherbakov/Naxos disc is one of my least enjoyable Scarlatti recordings.  I find him lacking the joy of the major key sonatas as well as the intensity of sadness of the three programmed minor key works.  However, I have to admit that my view is a minority one.

Just as it was in the Shostakovich thread. ;D

BorisG

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #29 on: February 29, 2008, 12:51:26 PM »
not really. the problem with this board is that whenever someone asks for a recommendation, every available CD gets posted. makes the whole thing rather pointless.

At the moment I think we are quite a ways from every available CD, but if you would like to help us along.... ;D

BorisG

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #30 on: February 29, 2008, 01:00:12 PM »
True. That is why it is important to know the tastes and knowledge level (size of collection also counts sometimes because if you only have 30 CDs...). For instance, I know Paul reads your posts on piano recordings, Edward for modern music, etc.

My least favorite posts are ones in which someone asks for recommendations of piano concerto and someone just put up a list of 500 piano concertos with no other comments. That just seems like showing off, and it is really just copy and paste.

Well, I am not qualified to say much in matters about music, really. Just my feelings, that's all.

It helps to know, too, that D. Scarlatti composed nearly 500 Sonatas, and that a buyer can randomly grab ten to twelve piano CDs and have little redundancy.

I find it fun to listen to as many of his Sonatas as possible, along with varying performer styles.

The crying of a few on this thread is so sad. Pass the Kleenex. ;D

sidoze

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #31 on: February 29, 2008, 01:29:36 PM »
At the moment I think we are quite a ways from every available CD, but if you would like to help us along.... ;D

Maria Tipo

http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail/1221162

Offline FideLeo

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #32 on: February 29, 2008, 01:35:46 PM »
Her playing is not very playful, but I still enjoy that recording a lot. Good choice of sonatas there, too.

Leonhardt (for example) is more playful than either Scott Ross or A. Zylbeyrajch.  But there is a Scarlatti
interpretation for every mood.   And the Cristofori instrument sounds so soulful as recorded. 
« Last Edit: February 29, 2008, 01:42:41 PM by fl.traverso »
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline Que

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #33 on: February 29, 2008, 01:47:51 PM »
On harpsichord Scott Ross is my favourite to date, chosen over Staier, Belder or Hantaï. I still have Dantone (Stradivarius) and Baiano (Symphonia) waiting on my wish list.



On piano I second Horowitz, like him more than the Marcelle Meyer (which is quite good btw) or Pletnev (doesn't do zip for me..)

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline Holden

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #34 on: February 29, 2008, 02:19:02 PM »
not really. the problem with this board is that whenever someone asks for a recommendation, every available CD gets posted. makes the whole thing rather pointless.

A good point though if a thread goes for long enough, you begin to see the outstanding candidates. One thing IO have noticed is that the majority of us will whole heartedly give a recommendation but never, because of a natural courtesy, criticise the recommendations of others. This 'criticism', which is never personal I hope, should also help the thread originator make up their mind.

That said I'd like to add to my post. Some have nominated Pogorelich vor the same reason as Sudbin because they both bring a sense of freshness to the music.While Sudbin uses pianistic 'colour' to achieve this, Pogorelich does not. He changes the value of the notation is many places by misuse of the 'rest' and adding a rubato type effect that did not exist in Scarlatti's day. Even after three separate auditions I can't bear to listen to it.
Cheers

Holden

Offline B_cereus

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #35 on: February 29, 2008, 02:35:26 PM »
In addition to the many splendid piano recommendations.




I like this one too.

bassio

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #36 on: March 01, 2008, 04:27:32 AM »
Ross is one of my favorite harpsichordist but unfortunately I still do not have his Scarlatti. Glad to know that it is widely recommended here.

On piano I second Horowitz, like him more than the Marcelle Meyer (which is quite good btw) or Pletnev (doesn't do zip for me..)

Q

I agree here.. I avoid Pletnev for Scarlatti (even if he is regarded as one of the most famous pianists who played Scarlatti)

Horowitz is ipso facto .. Pogorelich also had a very nice disc out. But the pianist who plays the K87 and K466 better than both in my opinion is Sudbin.

Offline FideLeo

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #37 on: March 01, 2008, 06:31:35 AM »
Ross is one of my favorite harpsichordist but unfortunately I still do not have his Scarlatti. Glad to know that it is widely recommended here.

I agree here.. I avoid Pletnev for Scarlatti (even if he is regarded as one of the most famous pianists who played Scarlatti)

Horowitz is ipso facto .. Pogorelich also had a very nice disc out. But the pianist who plays the K87 and K466 better than both in my opinion is Sudbin.

I find Pletnev's Scarlatti revolting.  Thank G I bought the set used for next to nothing or I would have regretted it to the extreme.
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline Holden

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #38 on: March 01, 2008, 02:20:58 PM »
I find Pletnev's Scarlatti revolting.  Thank G I bought the set used for next to nothing or I would have regretted it to the extreme.

Yes, what you hear is Pletnev, not Scarlatti.
Cheers

Holden

sidoze

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #39 on: March 01, 2008, 03:01:05 PM »
Yes, what you hear is Pletnev, not Scarlatti.

That is always the case with Pletnev. Always, IMO. I found his Kreisleriana dreadful (icy cold, heard it in concert 18 months ago) but his live Chopin is breathtaking in how personal and unique it sounds (Preludes, mazurkas, to a lesser extent the 3rd sonata). Very much hit and miss, but always personal at least.