Author Topic: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)  (Read 30319 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #240 on: May 11, 2017, 06:55:13 AM »
Wunderbar! 8)
The opening of the Fourth Symphony, especially in the Jarvi/BIS recording, is one of my favourite moments in Tubin's music.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #241 on: May 12, 2017, 03:57:31 AM »
The opening of the Fourth Symphony, especially in the Jarvi/BIS recording, is one of my favourite moments in Tubin's music.

It’s quite gorgeous indeed.
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Offline kyjo

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #242 on: October 19, 2017, 08:58:13 PM »
Prior to tonight, I had listened to Tubin's Symphonies 1, 4, 5, and 9 - enjoying but not being particularly thrilled by them (though I love the inspiriting finale of the 4th and the defiant ending of the 5th). But tonight, I listened to his Symphony no. 2 The Legendary, an absolutely extraordinary work which is causing me to radically rethink my opinion of Tubin's music. This work has some of the most captivating orchestration I've ever heard - there's prominent use of orchestral piano (I'm always a sucker for that) and significant violin and viola solos. The opening is deeply atmospheric - legendary indeed. The slow movement is an inexorable funeral march which paves the way for the epic finale, which contains some absolutely gripping music. In short, this work was a great discovery for me :)
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Offline Madiel

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #243 on: October 20, 2017, 04:33:49 AM »
No.2 is definitely one of the ones that is able to make a big, immediate impression. From my one listen to the cycle I think I was also quite taken with some of the later ones, but the 2nd seems to be one that consistently gets good reactions.
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Offline kyjo

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #244 on: October 20, 2017, 07:37:19 AM »
I think part of the reason I liked the Tubin 2nd so well is that some passages reminded me of my beloved Atterberg at his darkest and most tempestuous (e.g. the Storm movement of his 3rd Symphony and the outer movements of his 5th). Also, the prominent use of orchestral piano is a distinctive commonality between the two composers.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #245 on: October 21, 2017, 12:18:52 AM »
I think part of the reason I liked the Tubin 2nd so well is that some passages reminded me of my beloved Atterberg at his darkest and most tempestuous (e.g. the Storm movement of his 3rd Symphony and the outer movements of his 5th). Also, the prominent use of orchestral piano is a distinctive commonality between the two composers.

Yes, I can see this Kyle. The very first CD I bought (even before I owned a CD player!) was of Tubin's Second Symphony 'The Legendary' and Symphony 6 on BIS. I think that I'd heard No.2 on LP. It is possibly my favourite of the cycle - very exciting, powerful and moving although I greatly admire No.3 (I don't agree with Robert Layton that the final movement is 'bombastic') and also nos. 1,4 and especially the slow movement of 5 as well as No.10. Apparently No.6 is the most often played - I enjoy it but not as much as the others I have mentioned. Layton reckons that No.8 is Tubin's 'masterpiece' but I rate the ones I have mentioned higher.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline kyjo

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #246 on: November 03, 2017, 08:26:09 PM »
Was just listening to Tubin's 6th and enjoying it greatly. It's a thunderous, percussive score that is given a sleazy, jazzy edge by the prominent use of a solo saxophone (Tubin seemed to pick up some tips from RVW's Symphonies 6 and 9 and Job in this regard). Rather unexpectedly, the symphony ends quietly and movingly with a magical string chord.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #247 on: November 03, 2017, 11:12:59 PM »
Was just listening to Tubin's 6th and enjoying it greatly. It's a thunderous, percussive score that is given a sleazy, jazzy edge by the prominent use of a solo saxophone (Tubin seemed to pick up some tips from RVW's Symphonies 6 and 9 and Job in this regard). Rather unexpectedly, the symphony ends quietly and movingly with a magical string chord.
Must listen to it again as it isn't currently one of my favourites. Interesting point about the saxophones and VW connection Kyle.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline cilgwyn

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #248 on: November 05, 2017, 07:14:43 AM »
Was just listening to Tubin's 6th and enjoying it greatly. It's a thunderous, percussive score that is given a sleazy, jazzy edge by the prominent use of a solo saxophone (Tubin seemed to pick up some tips from RVW's Symphonies 6 and 9 and Job in this regard). Rather unexpectedly, the symphony ends quietly and movingly with a magical string chord.
Yes,let's hear it for Tubin's Sixth. It has always been one of my favourite Tubin symphonies. Indeed,only second to Tubin's Second,ever since I heard it,and recorded it (and the Second) off air on my portable radio cassette recorder,back in the  mid 1980's (the Second,anyway). I even kept the,still playable,cassette tapes. The recording of the Second being my oldest,extant,cassette recording! They make a wonderful pairing,on that Bis cd.

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #249 on: November 05, 2017, 12:24:17 PM »
Yesterday I was playing the Symphony 3. Simply, I can't remove from my mind that great melody that characterizes the 1st movement! I think it does honor the subtitle of this work 'Heroic'. It's really inspiring and blissful!

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #250 on: November 05, 2017, 12:53:47 PM »
Yesterday I was playing the Symphony 3. Simply, I can't remove from my mind that great melody that characterizes the 1st movement! I think it does honor the subtitle of this work 'Heroic'. It's really inspiring and blissful!
One of my favourites too Caesar.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #251 on: November 05, 2017, 02:13:38 PM »
One of my favourites too Caesar.

Very nice! I consider the symphonies 2 to 6 the real meat of his symphonic output.

Offline springrite

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #252 on: November 05, 2017, 04:21:58 PM »
Very nice! I consider the symphonies 2 to 6 the real meat of his symphonic output.

Absolutely!

But as us rib lovers know, some of the most delicious meat are to be found between the bones...
Do what I must do, and let what must happen happen.

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #253 on: July 05, 2018, 03:41:03 PM »
Was Tubin a lost brother of Bowen? I realize that both are very similar  :P

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #254 on: July 06, 2018, 12:34:13 AM »
Was Tubin a lost brother of Bowen? I realize that both are very similar  :P
Interesting, although Tubin is an incomparably greater composer I think. I'm yet to find a work by Bowen which I like.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline cilgwyn

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #255 on: July 06, 2018, 03:45:27 AM »
Was Tubin a lost brother of Bowen? I realize that both are very similar  :P
As someone who reads Private Eye,courtesy of my father,I couldn't help smiling at your post! :) I am of course referring to the (very) long running feature in the Letters pages,where someone sends in lookalike photos (and presumably,you were?) with the names swapped around ("Are they by any chance related?") This would make a fitting entry;although,unfortunately,not everyone would know who the h*** they were?!!   i.e.

       

York Bowen                                                          Eduard Tubin

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #256 on: July 06, 2018, 03:52:24 AM »
The pastime known in the US as Separated at Birth? . . .
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #257 on: July 06, 2018, 04:00:36 AM »
As someone who reads Private Eye,courtesy of my father,I couldn't help smiling at your post! :) I am of course referring to the (very) long running feature in the Letters pages,where someone sends in lookalike photos (and presumably,you were?) with the names swapped around ("Are they by any chance related?") This would make a fitting entry;although,unfortunately,not everyone would know who the h*** they were?!!   i.e.

       

York Bowen                                                          Eduard Tubin

Yes, I like that feature of Private Eye. George Lloyd and Margaret Rutherford could also have been 'separated at birth'.

Margaret Rutherford at the top and George Lloyd below of course.   8)
« Last Edit: July 06, 2018, 04:05:37 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #258 on: July 11, 2018, 09:29:29 AM »
Interesting, although Tubin is an incomparably greater composer I think. I'm yet to find a work by Bowen which I like.

In terms of artistic quality, Tubin is by far the greater composer for sure.

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Eduard Tubin (1905-82)
« Reply #259 on: July 11, 2018, 09:31:42 AM »
As someone who reads Private Eye,courtesy of my father,I couldn't help smiling at your post! :) I am of course referring to the (very) long running feature in the Letters pages,where someone sends in lookalike photos (and presumably,you were?) with the names swapped around ("Are they by any chance related?") This would make a fitting entry;although,unfortunately,not everyone would know who the h*** they were?!!   i.e.

       

York Bowen                                                          Eduard Tubin

Yes, it's undeniable their similarity

Yes, I like that feature of Private Eye. George Lloyd and Margaret Rutherford could also have been 'separated at birth'.

Margaret Rutherford at the top and George Lloyd below of course.   8)


Maybe his mother/grandmother? ;D