Author Topic: J.S. Bach on the Organ  (Read 395565 times)

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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #2800 on: March 07, 2019, 10:47:04 AM »
But the set is completely OOP and I already heard around 2011/2012 from the Stichting Groningen Orgelland that any chance of a reissue is (less than) zero.

I am very grateful, that a good friend gave me the set, before it disappeared for good.  :)
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Offline Marc

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #2801 on: March 10, 2019, 02:04:04 AM »
I am very grateful, that a good friend gave me the set, before it disappeared for good.  :)

And vice versa. :)
IIRC, Koopman/Beekman/Wiersma... thanks to a good friend, ten years later it still feels as if I started my quest through Bach's organ works with the Golden Standard.
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Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #2802 on: June 11, 2019, 09:12:16 PM »
Talking of articulated, have you heard Chorzempa’s Leipzig Chorales? They’re on Spotify etc, and I’ve enjoyed exploring his challenging vision.

I just checked out the Chorzempa - listened to my favorites, BWV 651 (Fantasia super Komm heiliger Geist), An Wasserflussen Babylon, O Lamm Gottes, and Vor deinen Tron. It is wonderful!

He takes his time and doesn't really try to build tension or push the music along. You are simply in heaven, no rush, even for the whole 10 minutes of O lamm Gottes. Although his articulation is consistently quite detached, there is still a wonderful sense on singing, and the overall effect is gently moving.

Doesn't hurt that it is played on the charming organ of Lebuinuskerk Deventer, mostly built in the 19th century (but in sort of an evolved Dutch Baroque style) but with pipework dating back to the time when Sweelinck was baptized at the very church in the 16th century.

I wonder what you find "challenging" about it? Usually something too austere or too eccentric would be "challenging" (in a good way), but I don't this was for me.

(Cross-posted from the general organ thread)

Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #2803 on: June 11, 2019, 09:15:42 PM »
BTW, I found out that tomorrow the Belgian organ radio Organroxx will be broadcasting among other things, the full first volume of Piet Wiersma's Bach in Groningen, with Clavier Ubung III played on the Groningen Martinikerk organ. Since Wiersma's Bach in Groningen is one of the great out-of-print-and-never-to-be-reissued "unicorn" Bach recordings, it would be a great chance for those who don't already have the recordings to hear it.

https://www.organroxx.com/en_US/playlist/1252

Online Mandryka

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #2804 on: June 12, 2019, 11:47:22 AM »
I just checked out the Chorzempa - listened to my favorites, BWV 651 (Fantasia super Komm heiliger Geist), An Wasserflussen Babylon, O Lamm Gottes, and Vor deinen Tron. It is wonderful!

He takes his time and doesn't really try to build tension or push the music along. You are simply in heaven, no rush, even for the whole 10 minutes of O lamm Gottes. Although his articulation is consistently quite detached, there is still a wonderful sense on singing, and the overall effect is gently moving.

Doesn't hurt that it is played on the charming organ of Lebuinuskerk Deventer, mostly built in the 19th century (but in sort of an evolved Dutch Baroque style) but with pipework dating back to the time when Sweelinck was baptized at the very church in the 16th century.

I wonder what you find "challenging" about it? Usually something too austere or too eccentric would be "challenging" (in a good way), but I don't this was for me.

(Cross-posted from the general organ thread)

I’m glad you like it, I love it too. It’s the rubato, or rather the absence of rubato, which I found a shock to the ears at first, and the small scale conception, it’s human being sized. “Gentle” is the right word I think, His WTC is a bit like that, and I like that very much too.

It’s hard for me to say why Chorzempa’s Bach is often so adorable.
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Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #2805 on: June 16, 2019, 10:03:35 PM »
I’m glad you like it, I love it too. It’s the rubato, or rather the absence of rubato, which I found a shock to the ears at first, and the small scale conception, it’s human being sized. “Gentle” is the right word I think, His WTC is a bit like that, and I like that very much too.

It’s hard for me to say why Chorzempa’s Bach is often so adorable.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqx5OQIkiu8

Well thanks to you the WTC is a great discovery. Eccentric choices of instruments, but all played very lyrically and of course, gently.

Maybe the organ playing here is the weakest link - at least, compared to the wonderful clavichords.

What are the instruments being used here? Seems like he is playing on a lot of different instruments, even a few different clavichords.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2019, 10:07:44 PM by bioluminescentsquid »

Online Mandryka

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #2806 on: June 16, 2019, 10:50:01 PM »


What are the instruments being used here? Seems like he is playing on a lot of different instruments, even a few different clavichords.

I don't know. The man who released them for Philips (Tom Deacon),once said to me that he thought that the instruments were his own. Bk 1 was released on LP first, and then Tom got him to reassemble the instruments, he recorded Book 2 and Tom put the whole thing in a box of CDs. Hats off to Tom for recognising the interest in the performances -- musical rather than commercial interest I suspect, I wonder if this WTC has ever broke even.

Is he still alive? If he is I'm sure he'd appreciate an email from you, and be more than happy to tell you about the instruments.

Premont has the set, so maybe the details are there.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2019, 10:54:45 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #2807 on: June 17, 2019, 04:23:48 AM »

Premont has the set, so maybe the details are there.

Yes, I think so. I shall look for the information.
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Offline JBS

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #2808 on: June 17, 2019, 06:16:49 AM »
I don't know. The man who released them for Philips (Tom Deacon),once said to me that he thought that the instruments were his own. Bk 1 was released on LP first, and then Tom got him to reassemble the instruments, he recorded Book 2 and Tom put the whole thing in a box of CDs. Hats off to Tom for recognising the interest in the performances -- musical rather than commercial interest I suspect, I wonder if this WTC has ever broke even.

Is he still alive? If he is I'm sure he'd appreciate an email from you, and be more than happy to tell you about the instruments.

Premont has the set, so maybe the details are there.

Apparently he is alive and living in Florence.  Contact details are part of his website
http://www.chorzempa.com/index.html

Although that little biography seems to date from 2003.

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #2809 on: June 17, 2019, 10:39:31 AM »
Yes, I think so. I shall look for the information.

Book I:

Clavichord Hieronymus A Haas, Hamburg 1742

Harpsichord Carl Conrad Fleischer, Hamburg 1716

Cabinet-organ unknown Dutch builder Schnitger school (Matthias Schulze?) 1732?
(no information about disposition or tuning)

Book II:

Harpsichord 1 attributed to Gottfried Silbermann school 1750 or a bit later
BWV 870, 872, 874, 885, 888, 889, 892 & 893

Harpsichord 2 Johann Christoph Fleischer, Hamburg 1710
BWV 871, 880, 886 & 890.

Clavichord Johann Heinrich Silbermann, Strassbourg ca.1775

Organ Matthias Schulze? ca. 1732
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Offline Marc

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #2810 on: June 19, 2019, 09:30:18 AM »
I just checked out the Chorzempa - listened to my favorites, BWV 651 (Fantasia super Komm heiliger Geist), An Wasserflussen Babylon, O Lamm Gottes, and Vor deinen Tron. It is wonderful!

He takes his time and doesn't really try to build tension or push the music along. You are simply in heaven, no rush, even for the whole 10 minutes of O lamm Gottes. Although his articulation is consistently quite detached, there is still a wonderful sense on singing, and the overall effect is gently moving.

Doesn't hurt that it is played on the charming organ of Lebuinuskerk Deventer, mostly built in the 19th century (but in sort of an evolved Dutch Baroque style) but with pipework dating back to the time when Sweelinck was baptized at the very church in the 16th century.

I wonder what you find "challenging" about it? Usually something too austere or too eccentric would be "challenging" (in a good way), but I don't this was for me.

(Cross-posted from the general organ thread)

To me, Chorzempa offers an attractive combination of 'no nonsense' and refined lyrical playing... a bit like Ewald Kooiman. I like them both very much.
Chorzempa's recordings of f.i. the Trio Sonatas (Meppel, Hervormde Kerk) and the Orgelbüchlein (Leiden, Marekerk) are splendid, too. And his BWV 565 (Breda, Onze Lieve Vrouwekerk, reissued on Pentatone) is still one of my favourite renditions of this piece.
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Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #2811 on: June 19, 2019, 06:55:37 PM »
Book I:

Clavichord Hieronymus A Haas, Hamburg 1742

Harpsichord Carl Conrad Fleischer, Hamburg 1716

Cabinet-organ unknown Dutch builder Schnitger school (Matthias Schulze?) 1732?
(no information about disposition or tuning)

Book II:

Harpsichord 1 attributed to Gottfried Silbermann school 1750 or a bit later
BWV 870, 872, 874, 885, 888, 889, 892 & 893

Harpsichord 2 Johann Christoph Fleischer, Hamburg 1710
BWV 871, 880, 886 & 890.

Clavichord Johann Heinrich Silbermann, Strassbourg ca.1775

Organ Matthias Schulze? ca. 1732

Thanks for the information! All wonderful and intriguing instruments.

 

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