Author Topic: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)  (Read 49852 times)

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karlhenning

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #80 on: October 20, 2010, 08:44:09 AM »
But, dude, Triadic Memories is one of my faves. And you can find it on a single disc, too.

karlhenning

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #81 on: October 20, 2010, 10:56:51 AM »
The last time I "heard" that Kronos cd was during sex. It repeated 3 times. DavidW will never listen to the piece again!

You really need a full paragraph break, there . . . .

DavidW

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #82 on: October 20, 2010, 12:05:30 PM »
snips I'm sure that your gf thanks you for the most unique experience that she has ever had. :D

snyprrr

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #83 on: November 22, 2010, 02:52:03 PM »
John11inch ::) has posted SQ 2, in 28 installments on YouTube. I'm on 1 now, and frankly, I can tell that this is not my fav Feldman. So far it's reminding of SQ (1979), meaning, it's not in the obsessive, Triadic Memories/Piano & SQ, style.

I believe most all Feldman is now on YouTube thanks to John11inch and Wellesz.

Offline petrarch

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #84 on: November 22, 2010, 04:39:16 PM »
John11inch ::) has posted SQ 2, in 28 installments on YouTube. I'm on 1 now, and frankly, I can tell that this is not my fav Feldman. So far it's reminding of SQ (1979), meaning, it's not in the obsessive, Triadic Memories/Piano & SQ, style.

I like SQ2 a lot. It's more contemplative than obsessive. I attended a performance of it at the Zankel Hall auditorium at Carnegie Hall in NYC some 5 years ago and I can tell you I didn't feel it was long, so engrossing were the notes, the timbre, the flow and overall sound. The audience was invited to change positions at will to experience the work from different perspectives, including stepping up to the stage and stand, sit or lie down next to the musicians. A truly memorable experience.
//p
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snyprrr

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #85 on: November 22, 2010, 10:46:05 PM »
I like SQ2 a lot. It's more contemplative than obsessive. I attended a performance of it at the Zankel Hall auditorium at Carnegie Hall in NYC some 5 years ago and I can tell you I didn't feel it was long, so engrossing were the notes, the timbre, the flow and overall sound. The audience was invited to change positions at will to experience the work from different perspectives, including stepping up to the stage and stand, sit or lie down next to the musicians. A truly memorable experience.

ok, well thaaat's cool! ;) I'm sure I wouldn't be complaining about that!



I admit the foible of not being able to deal with the multi-cd format of Late Feldman. I had many of those HatHut boxes,...oy, and sold them for like $1 a piece (ouch,... pre-snyprrr), and, I mean,... Imean,...

The guy "scarecrow" on Amazon said something about For Christian Wolff, like, where do we need a 4hr. flute sonata? I just thought he had a point there.



I have a serious question here, which feels to me like the elephant in the room. Will you forgive me for asking, but was Feldman a drug addict? I know, obviously, that his music derives from his smoking, haha,... so, I mean, was he a Junkie too, like so many New York Artists? If that were the case, then wouldn't it be obvious where his inspiration came from? I mean, is he just mimicking a narcotic high? I'm sorry, but his entire output, much as I like it, sounds like Junkie Genius. No?

karlhenning

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #86 on: November 23, 2010, 04:38:52 AM »
Drug use is inimical to creative work.  Even the Beatles, who wound up popularizing the myth, demonstrate my point: through most of the Sgt Pepper sessions, Lennon was high to some extent or other, and most of the time he was no bloody use.
 
However, I digress.  Someone who knows Feldman's bio much better than I must answer . . . .

snyprrr

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #87 on: November 24, 2010, 09:30:25 AM »
I'm 1hr. into SQ 2.

I still think it reminds me of SQ '79,... will have to listen to that later.

eh,... I like "listening" as it goes, but, on a theoretical level, I just don't see the need for the duration. I know it's supposed to be aural wallpaper, but, for that, anything will do (bees, birds, trees).

I just find myself wanting to shake my head disapprovingly at Feldman, like, Oh, you are just so willful, aren't you?

The more I contemplate the implications of a SIX HOUR STRING QUARTET (haha), the more I demand an answer to my question about whether Feldman was a bona fide drug addict (which, as I said, his cigarette consumption heartily attests to). Isn't it almost obvious that his music has an opiate quality to it? I've been on hospital drugs before, and they made me feel the way Feldman sounds, soooo,...




Still, as far as SQ 2, I would rather like to hear the other Feldman style, the obsessing on one idea, like Piano & String Quartet, rather than the patch-quilt style of SQ '79. Has anyone written that one yet (Beat Furrer No.3?)?

karlhenning

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #88 on: November 24, 2010, 09:34:31 AM »
eh,... I like "listening" as it goes, but, on a theoretical level, I just don't see the need for the duration. I know it's supposed to be aural wallpaper, but, for that, anything will do (bees, birds, trees).

Still, there is a distinction.  The bees do what they do, the birds do what they do.  With Feldman, there is nonetheless the dimension of an artist's intention.

snyprrr

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #89 on: November 24, 2010, 09:46:27 AM »
Still, there is a distinction.  The bees do what they do, the birds do what they do.  With Feldman, there is nonetheless the dimension of an artist's intention.

And I think it is that "intentionality" that I am frowning on. Instead of hearing all the open possibilities of life, I am hearing the cold, calculated, sterile musings of a city dweller locked away in a hermetically sealed studio filled with stale cigarette smoke.

I am starting to become more interested in Feldman's personal day-to-day behavior than his music. Go figure. Maybe I'm just obsessed with his bizarre, turtle-like appearance? And the cigarette thing,... why,... IS that disturbing? ???

He looks mean.

Offline petrarch

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #90 on: November 24, 2010, 03:16:03 PM »
And I think it is that "intentionality" that I am frowning on. Instead of hearing all the open possibilities of life, I am hearing the cold, calculated, sterile musings of a city dweller locked away in a hermetically sealed studio filled with stale cigarette smoke.

I am starting to become more interested in Feldman's personal day-to-day behavior than his music. Go figure. Maybe I'm just obsessed with his bizarre, turtle-like appearance? And the cigarette thing,... why,... IS that disturbing? ???

He looks mean.

It's been almost a decade since I last read it, but I recall enjoying it very much, and might give you some insight into him:

Give my regards to Eighth Street
http://www.amazon.com/Regards-Eighth-Street-Exact-Change/dp/1878972316
//p
The music collection.
The hi-fi system: Esoteric X-03SE -> Pathos Logos -> Analysis Audio Amphitryon.
A view of the whole

karlhenning

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #91 on: November 24, 2010, 04:58:42 PM »
. . . I am starting to become more interested in Feldman's personal day-to-day behavior than his music.

Can't help you, there. Day-to-day behavior in Buffalo, NY is not something that any man with feeling can long contemplate with an untroubled spirit.

Offline mjwal

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #92 on: November 25, 2010, 08:14:16 AM »
I will second the recommendation of Give My Regards to Eighth St
and to various people's recommendations of Rothko Chapel, Palais de Mari and the Cello Concerto (among others) I would add:
Words and Music - Beckett "setting", absolutely riveting and deeply moving, with an IMO impressive Omar Ibrahim - but for a negative review of this recording, the only one ever available in Europe I think, go to this great page on the Beckett/Feldman nexus: http://www.themodernword.com/beckett/beckett_feldman_wam.html
For Samuel Beckett (which I find achingly sad; I have 2 recordings but not the one by Cambreling)
Three Voices for Joan La Barbara
For Stefan Wolpe
and the first I ever experienced, in a concert: For Philip Guston (I only nodded off once or twice during the 3 and three quarter hour duration; of the 60 or so listeners in the Musikhochschule about fifteen were left.)
The Violin's Obstinacy

It needs to return to this one note,
not a tune and not a key
but the sound of self it must depart from,
a journey lengthily to go
in a vein it knows will cripple it.
...
Peter Porter

snyprrr

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #93 on: November 25, 2010, 02:43:50 PM »
Can't help you, there. Day-to-day behavior in Buffalo, NY is not something that any man with feeling can long contemplate with an untroubled spirit.

Buffalo?,... do tell.

PaulSC

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #94 on: December 22, 2010, 07:54:16 PM »
Ah... Gotta love Gracenote/CDDB...  :D

(The real answer is Morton Feldman: String Quartet, which I'm ripping from my old Koch CD. And no, I didn't upload this correct data to the Gracenote database.)

Offline Daverz

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #95 on: December 22, 2010, 08:02:39 PM »
Ah... Gotta love Gracenote/CDDB...  :D

(The real answer is Morton Feldman: String Quartet, which I'm ripping from my old Koch CD. And no, I didn't upload this correct data to the Gracenote database.)

The cover features Uncle Morty in a thong.  (Sorry for the image... ;D ).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #96 on: January 17, 2011, 08:31:55 PM »
I just bought the recording with Rothko Chapel and Why Patterns? on New Albion and this will be my first foray into Feldman's sound world. I have read through this thread and it's very interesting to read James' comments. He comes to music from a very narrow perspective. I don't think he can fully appreciate what Feldman does unless he puts his guard down and just lets the music speak for itself. This isn't music that somebody is going to get instantly and if they do, then they probably already knew what to expect going into the music.

We never know if we don't like something until we've given it a fair chance to grow on us. Apart of my appreciation for a composer like Berg or Ligeti, for example, stemmed from reading about their lives, the events that shaped their music, and most importantly actually listening to the music with an open-mind. If you come to the music with some kind of pre-conceived notion, then you'll never appreciate what it has to offer the listener. Music can come from so many different perspectives but you'll never understand anything unless you remain available to the music.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2011, 08:33:35 PM by Mirror Image »
“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

PaulSC

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #97 on: January 17, 2011, 10:19:33 PM »
Mirror Image, I hope you enjoy exploring Feldman. You've picked an excellent pair of works to start. In terms of the context for appreciating this work, Feldman's essays are recommended reading -- irreverent, coarse language, sharp thinking.



(Edit: and of course I thought AFTER posting to review the thread, and this book has already been mentioned multiple times.)
« Last Edit: January 17, 2011, 10:47:24 PM by PaulSC »

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #98 on: January 18, 2011, 08:31:38 AM »
Mirror Image, I hope you enjoy exploring Feldman. You've picked an excellent pair of works to start. In terms of the context for appreciating this work, Feldman's essays are recommended reading -- irreverent, coarse language, sharp thinking.



(Edit: and of course I thought AFTER posting to review the thread, and this book has already been mentioned multiple times.)


I'll have to check that book out sometime. Thanks.
“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline Rinaldo

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Re: Morton Feldman (1926-1987)
« Reply #99 on: July 11, 2011, 01:20:22 PM »
This isn't music that somebody is going to get instantly and if they do, then they probably already knew what to expect going into the music.

I think if you're accustomed to ambient music, Feldman is very approachable – especially the "popular" pieces like Rothko Chapel (I was hooked from the opening bars; it immediately sets an intriguing atmosphere).

Listening to Coptic Light right now for the second time in a row.. mesmerizing. This is the kind of music that fires up my imagination & takes it to new, undiscovered worlds.