Author Topic: Recordings for lute and related instruments  (Read 59052 times)

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Offline milk

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #240 on: March 08, 2018, 09:11:26 AM »
All,

This is such a great thread.  I thank you; my wallet does not.  I keep an amazon tab open while reading this thread.  Thank you all for contributing, and please do continue.

Regards,
-09
There's fantastic stuff here. :)

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #241 on: March 08, 2018, 09:40:36 AM »


Another interesting Rooley lute album, I've only just discovered it, and my first impressions are rather positive. English music.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2018, 09:48:55 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #242 on: March 09, 2018, 12:04:29 AM »
Morning listening:


I have the original issue on Symphonia (now defunct),
but posting this reissue on Pan Classics is more convenient for those interested.  :)

Q

A very nice recording, what impressed me most was the variety of the music, sometimes introspective, sometimes dancing in an naive outdoors peasant style, sometimes lyrical. The instruments are attractive too, especially the sunny sounding Italian vihuela.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2018, 12:19:59 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Que

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #243 on: March 09, 2018, 01:28:02 AM »
A very nice recording, what impressed me most was the variety of the music, sometimes introspective, sometimes dancing in an naive outdoors peasant style, sometimes lyrical. The instruments are attractive too, especially the sunny sounding Italian vihuela.

Fully agree.  :) A happy marriage of great original music and excellent performance. One of my favourite lute recordings.

Q
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Offline milk

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #244 on: March 09, 2018, 07:25:16 AM »
Something I'm checking out but, disappointingly, there's no pdf with the digital download. This has a lot of anonymous music on it and familiar music as well. I really like this performer who is new for me. He's very mellow, yet he also has, I think, that "broken style" that's been discussed here. At least I think that's what I'm hearing.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2018, 07:51:33 AM by milk »

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #245 on: March 10, 2018, 06:32:43 AM »
Lex Eisenhardt's notes on Angelo Michele Bartolotti, with some evident comments on the difference between French and Italian music, and the dumbing down effect of Louis XIV style.

Quote
BARTOLOTTI SUITES FOR GUITAR


Little is known about the life of Angelo Michele Bartolotti. There are three surviving publications from his hand, two books with guitar music, one from 1640 and the other from c.1655-56 and a short instruction book for the theorbolrom 1669. The books for the guitar were probably engraved by the composer himself and their distribution must have been very limited. The portrait in the 'Ebro secondo' could even be a self-portrait.

Bartolotti lived for a long period in Bologna and was possibly born there. In the middle of the 17th century there was an important Bolognese guitar-school, consisting of Francisco Corbetta, Giovanni Battista Granata and Bartolotti as the leading figures. Around the years 1655-1656 Bartolotti was in Rome, where he dedicated his 'libro secondo' to Christina, the queen of Sweden (the 'Sybil of the North'). After her abdication Christina lived in Rome for some years where she gathered a circle of renowned artists around her, of whom Johann Jacob Froberger is amongst the best known today. Bartolotti in this period played the theorbo in continuo groups in the oratoria and operas of composers like Cavalli.

In 1656 Bartolotti, like many Italian musicians moved to France where he was employed at the wealthy court of France under Louis XIV, in His Majesty's Cabinet, together with other Italian virtuosi. In place of the music for the guitar, which became very much in vogue, the most attention was attracted by the Virtuoso Francisco Corbetta, who was very successful at the Royal Courts both in London and Versailles and published, amongst others, two different books under the title "La Guitarre Royalle", in 1671 and 1674.


Why is it that Bartolotti is so little known? Here we see the uncertaintities that surround his life. Although he was held in very high esteem by some of his contemporaries for his continuo-playing (he was called the best theorbist of Italy and France, practically the whole musical world at the time),-after his departure to France no attention was given to his guitar music anymore, despite the fact that the guitar became as popular as the lute. Where Corbetta wrote elegant menuettes and gavottes, Bartolotti's music was often much more complex. Bartolotti's use ofthe instrument was really unconventional and difficult, and it asks for a very good technical and musical knowledge to be fully understood. The 'guitaromanie' was mainly for amateur players (to whom his music must have appeared too complicated). Nothing is known of Bartolotti's attempts to adapt his guitar style to the more elegant French taste of that t'u'ne, and it is surprising that nothing further was heard of him as a guitarist.

One possible answer is to be found in the style of his guitar works. French music, dominated by (the Italian) Lully, was very much directed to agreeable melodic lines, easily sung. The capricious virtuoso Italian style, with many extravagant effects, that was developed in the first decades of the century did not please the French so much. And the music of Bartolotti, the 'Miquelange Italienc though influenced by the famous French lutenists like Denis ('vieux') Gaultier and Dufault was, on the other hand, sometimes very capricious and Italian. The d minor prelude for example is set up as a toccata in which there are free virtuoso passages altemated by more straight, imitative polyphonic writing and some short homophonic sections. Forms like this are to be found in Frescobaldi's music for harpsichord. As a contrast to this, most allemandes and courantes are in the French style, whereas the finely crafted gigues, little balanced gems, are foreshadowing the 'gouts reunis' and the intemational style of the later baroque.

The influence of the French lutenists is to be seen in some of the preludes (e.g. that in D major) and allemandes, written in the 'style brisee' the broken lutestyle, that also influenced the harpsichord music of the Couperins. Another mark of the French influence is to be seen in the exclusive use of dance forms in the 'libro secondo', yet the Italian Bartolotti was one of the very first composers writing complete baroque suites with the sequence: prelude, allemande, courante, sarabande and gigue. In fact, these suites are among the earliest known examples of the kind, earlier even than those of Froberger.

The music is written for an instrument which was usually called the Chitarra Spagnola, the Spanish guitar. Still there was almost no repertoire from Spain and in the first half of the 17th century most of the music came from Italy, starting with the strummed chords practice that was in use in the accompaniment of vocal music. The guitar was frequently mentioned as one of the possible instruments to be used in a continuo group. In Art music it was an accepted suppletion of the continuo, while it was considered to be too limited to fulfill the needs of a continuo part on its own. But one can suppose that in the homes of the people and on the streets the guitar played a similar part in song accompaniment as it does today.


For the more refined, composed music some tunings were developed that had no low bass-strings at all. The most important composers like Corbetta, de Visee and also Bartolotti chose for their music the tuning (see example) which allowed them to use the fourth course (pair of strings) both for lower notes and for the upper voice. In fact, this is one of the mysteries in the history of the instrument and with these tunings the ambitus of the instrument becomes very limited. Here we meet a third, probably determining reason for the oblivion into which this music has fallen: it is impossible to play it properly on any other instrument, and the baroque guitar did not survive the 18th century. Yet this tuning is advantageous in the so-called 'campanelas', (small ringing church-bells). This technique consists of the use of the higher sounding - and lower placed - fourth and fifth courses. Played like an arpeggio, this results in faster scale sections. Bartolotti's music is, possibly more than anyone else's, characterised by a constant use of the lower courses in the upper voices. Often even within the space of one bar the fourth course is used for both the bassline and the melody.

© 1994 Lex Eisenhardt
« Last Edit: March 10, 2018, 06:34:18 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline milk

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #246 on: March 13, 2018, 04:36:10 AM »

I wanted to reaffirm what a really great recording this is. The sound is pleasing, the playing is engaging, and the program is interesting.

Offline milk

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #247 on: March 13, 2018, 06:53:40 PM »
I feel like I need some sort of intervention. Recently I've become addicted to Spanish early guitar and vihuela music. But, this genre is kind of limited. There's just only so much of it. I'm caught in a loop that I know I'll have to get out of eventually. I do listen to a lot of lute music too. I also find myself less and less tolerant of romantic music so I don't like romantic guitar much. Maybe I need deprogramming.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #248 on: March 13, 2018, 10:33:32 PM »


A thumbs up from me for the Holborne component of this release by Yavor Genov.

Genov knows how to let the music respire by punctuating it with pregnant pauses. The result is music which is imbued with mystery, Genov reveals Holborne to be the at the top of the tree of English Renaissance lute composers, at least from the point of view of poetry.

Recording too close but listenable, rich, muscular and resonant lute, I don't have details, and to his credit Genov doesn't over-indulge in the resonances.

I haven't heard the music by Johnson yet.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2018, 10:37:48 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #249 on: March 14, 2018, 10:53:50 AM »


And another big thumbs up for this Holborne Cd from Federico Marincola, who plays a more delicate lute than Genov's. The performances are natural and self effacing, he has a feel for the mystery and complexity of the music - the aspect which so impressed me about Genov. With Marincola as with Genov, the music is always much more than a bunch of sweet melodies - I wish these guys would play Dowland!
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Offline Vinbrulé

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #250 on: March 15, 2018, 04:43:51 AM »


And another big thumbs up for this Holborne Cd from Federico Marincola, who plays a more delicate lute than Genov's. The performances are natural and self effacing, he has a feel for the mystery and complexity of the music - the aspect which so impressed me about Genov. With Marincola as with Genov, the music is always much more than a bunch of sweet melodies - I wish these guys would play Dowland!
If you like Holborne's music played on lute ( Holborne himself was a lute player, but he transcribed a lot of his music for consort of viols  :  well worth listening is Savall moving performance , among others )  you could have a look on a Hopkinson Smith CD  titled  "Mad Dog"  :  he puts together pieces by Holborne, John Johnson, Byrd and Dowland.  But  mainly by Holborne.  There is the Fantasy written by the enigmatic Gregorio Huwet , as well !!

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #251 on: March 16, 2018, 12:05:24 AM »
If you like Holborne's music played on lute ( Holborne himself was a lute player, but he transcribed a lot of his music for consort of viols  :  well worth listening is Savall moving performance , among others )  you could have a look on a Hopkinson Smith CD  titled  "Mad Dog"  :  he puts together pieces by Holborne, John Johnson, Byrd and Dowland.  But  mainly by Holborne.  There is the Fantasy written by the enigmatic Gregorio Huwet , as well !!

Yes I'm strarting to explore that one. What do you make of Christopher Wilson's Holborne? A friend of mine raves about it but so far I find it a bit elusive, but this is probably just my mood.

Savall's Holborne reminds me in a way of the recent Gibbons recording by L'acheron, it has  the same sort of seriousness.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2018, 12:11:43 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline San Antone

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #252 on: March 16, 2018, 12:36:50 AM »
Yes I'm strarting to explore that one. What do you make of Christopher Wilson's Holborne? A friend of mine raves about it but so far I find it a bit elusive, but this is probably just my mood.

Speaking of Christopher Wilson, I enjoy this one -



Fantasia de Mon Triste - Renaissance Lute Virtuosi of Rome and Venice
Christopher Wilson

Offline Vinbrulé

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #253 on: March 16, 2018, 05:00:02 AM »
Yes I'm strarting to explore that one. What do you make of Christopher Wilson's Holborne? A friend of mine raves about it but so far I find it a bit elusive, but this is probably just my mood.

Savall's Holborne reminds me in a way of the recent Gibbons recording by L'acheron, it has  the same sort of seriousness.
  By the way .... my very first Holborne cd was "The fruit of love"  by L'acheron , on Ricercare label. 
I have some discs by Christopher Wilson ( among which the Naxos edition with pieces by Holborne and Thomas Robinson) :  well , in my opinion , Wilson is one of those players whose qualities are brought into focus after several listening , not immediately .  For instance, I have not immediately enjoyed "Fantasia de mon triste"  , quoted here above by Marcabru , but when I took it off the shelf after several weeks and put it for the second time on the cd player ..... oh, it was very clear to me :  Christopher Wilson is a great lute player !!   Another thing, related to this one : I am NOT ALWAYS a  great listener !!   :D :D :D     
( probably a day will come when I'll be able to fully appreciate Paul Beier's  Reusner  )
« Last Edit: March 16, 2018, 05:17:32 AM by Vinbrulé »

Offline Vinbrulé

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #254 on: March 16, 2018, 06:39:59 AM »
Growing older ( I'm 67 ) I more and more appreciate and NEED abstract music more than any other kind of music .
I mean absolute music , pure music ,  without extramusical references,  like the  Fantasias by Byrd, Gibbons or Purcell, or The Art Of Fugue ...... well, The Art Of Fugue for me is the Everest in music.
So, exploring the world of lute music I have been in search for something of that kind , and I am still in search.  Some pieces by Dowland, or Johnson adapt to my needs , and some beautiful pieces by Francesco da Milano or Alberto da Mantova (alias Albert de Rippe) as well .
But  JSB  Art of Fugue is still far away.   :-[    (Nevertheless I am immensely grateful to Nigel North for his magnificent transcriptions of the cello suites and the violin partitas & sonatas ,  Linn label, 4 CDs)
I apologize for going off topic (and for my poor English) 
« Last Edit: March 16, 2018, 06:49:16 AM by Vinbrulé »

Offline San Antone

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #255 on: March 16, 2018, 06:42:35 AM »
Growing older ( I'm 67 ) I more and more appreciate and NEED abstract music more than any other kind of music .
I mean absolute music , pure music ,  without extramusical references,  like the  Fantasias by Byrd, Gibbons or Purcell, or The Art Of Fugue ...... well, The Art Of Fugue for me is the Everest in music.
So, exploring the world of lute music I have been in search for something of that kind , and I am still in search.  Some pieces by Dowland, or Johnson adapt to my needs , and some beautiful pieces by Francesco da Milano or Alberto da Mantova (alias Albert de Rippe) as well .
But  JSB  Art of Fugue is still far away.   :-[
I apologize for going off topic (and for my poor English)

This recording has been discussed here -



It might be what you're looking for.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #256 on: March 16, 2018, 07:40:20 AM »
Growing older ( I'm 67 ) I more and more appreciate and NEED abstract music more than any other kind of music .
I mean absolute music , pure music ,  without extramusical references,  like the  Fantasias by Byrd, Gibbons or Purcell, or The Art Of Fugue ...... well, The Art Of Fugue for me is the Everest in music.
So, exploring the world of lute music I have been in search for something of that kind , and I am still in search.  Some pieces by Dowland, or Johnson adapt to my needs , and some beautiful pieces by Francesco da Milano or Alberto da Mantova (alias Albert de Rippe) as well .
But  JSB  Art of Fugue is still far away.   :-[    (Nevertheless I am immensely grateful to Nigel North for his magnificent transcriptions of the cello suites and the violin partitas & sonatas ,  Linn label, 4 CDs)
I apologize for going off topic (and for my poor English)

I think Lex Eisenhardt has a way of making the music sound abstracted from flesh and blood.

(and for my poor English)

But your English is perfect  :)
« Last Edit: March 16, 2018, 07:42:04 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Vinbrulé

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #257 on: March 16, 2018, 08:14:14 AM »
This recording has been discussed here -



It might be what you're looking for.
Vincenzo Galilei ?  mmmm, he was Galileo's father !  Well, thank you, I will investigate in that direction.

Offline Que

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #258 on: March 16, 2018, 11:50:50 AM »
Vincenzo Galilei ?  mmmm, he was Galileo's father !  Well, thank you, I will investigate in that direction.

Go back to page 8 for some comments:

http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,6895.msg1126629.html#msg1126629

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
« Reply #259 on: March 22, 2018, 04:53:36 AM »
Sigrun Richter on Esias Reusner

Quote
1654 Reusner returned to Breslau, and in 1655 he was appointed lutenist at the court
of Brieg (Brzeg). In 1660 he married Maria Bohm, the daughter of a councilman in
Breslau. In 1672 he became chamber lutenist at the court of the Elector Friedrich
Wilhelm of Brandenburg. On 1st May 1679 Reusner died at the age of 44, leaving
behind his wife and three sons.


Reusner's Suites for solo lute are preserved in two printed sources: Delitiae
Testudinis, also known as Erfreuliche Lautenlust (Pleasant Lute Delights), was
published in 1667 and 1668 in Breslau, and posthumously in 1697 in Berlin. His
second opus, Neue Lautenfruchte (New Fruits of the Lute), was published in 1676 in
Berlin. The two books differ not only stylistically but also visually. The typography
used for the tablature in Delitiae Testudinis is extremely ornate, making it difficult
to read. In contrast, the writing in Neue Lautenfruchte is very clear; also useful for
the interpretation are the added right hand fingerings. The second book contains
the scordatura suites in B flat major and D minor recorded on this CD.


The significance of Esaias Reusner the Younger's lute suites


Esaias ReusnerJunior is regarded as the first prominent German master of the lute
suite. Although his musical language was very much influenced by the prevalent
French style (he adopted the French style brise and placed a prelude non mesure at
the beginning of some of his suites), it also deviated from it. His music can be
described as an attempt to combine the elegance of the French style with a more
colourful harmonic language and a clear taste for the cantabile. It is not surprising
that he insisted in the prologue to his Neue Lautenfruchte on the importance of a
vocal-like and rhetorical approach to playing his music:


„One must pay close attention to the inflexion of the tones when playing the lute,
that they not always be played loudly, but rather at times in a little more restrained
and mild manner, in an oratorical way, so that one may more fully apply oneself to
the sweetness [of the sound], rather than merely attacking the great lute, in order that everything be well expressed and clea rly stated." ' (Neue Lauten-Fruchte, 1676)


The influence of Reusner's music lasted beyond his death. Proof of this can be seen in the posthumous publication of the print Erfreuliche Lautenlust in 1697. His name also appears next to the names of French lutenists/composers; e.g. in a Parisian manuscript MS Rene Milleran, from ca. 1690 - his named is stated as: „Mr. Reusner de Brandenburg". Most of the pieces in this manuscript give the name of the composer together with the title of the movement. Others, especially near the end of the book, fail to mention the composer. It has not been determined which of these movements were in fact written by Reusner. A further manuscript from ca. 1700 (MS AUS-LHD 243) is preserved today in Melbourne, Australia. It contains works by Bohemian lutenists as well as pieces by Gaultier, Pinel and Reusner. Once again, we find Reusner in company of French musicians. Noteworthy is the fact that the manuscript calls for a lute tuned in A-d-f#-a-d'-f#'. It contains only pieces in D major. The movements from Reusner's Suite in D major from Neue Lautenfruchte are arranged here for this scordatura and provided with additional variations - Double or Separation. This is an example of how freely music from the past was often handled. (On this recording, Reusner's D major Suite is presented in its original version, as it appeared in in 1676 in Neue Lautenfruchte.)

 Ernst Gottlieb Baron underscores the influential role of Esaias Reusner Junior for the development of a musical language specific to the lute. In his Historisch-Theoretische und Practische Untersuchung des Instruments der Lauten, Mit Flei3 aufgesetzt und alien rechtschaffenen Liebhabern sum Vergnugen heraus gege-ben,2 Nuremberg, 1727, he writes:

„Let us now turn to those who have already begun to unite the harmonious with the cantabile, and who have been able to choose less constrained and more elegant melodies. The two Reusners, father and son, of Silesian origin, were without a doubt the first ones who strived to compose free-flowing melodies that agreed with the spirit of the instrument; ..."


Sigrun Richter (Translation: Milo Machover )
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