Author Topic: Webern's Vibe  (Read 17404 times)

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Offline Archaic Torso of Apollo

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #100 on: June 30, 2014, 03:02:59 PM »
Is there anything Webern composed that is as frightening and powerful as the end of the 4th piece from "Six Pieces for Orchestra"?

I find the Op. 1 Passacaglia extraordinarily gripping and disturbing. It's like a late Mahler symphony condensed into 10 minutes.
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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #101 on: August 08, 2014, 04:52:19 AM »
Well, you've got to hope that there is more on that CD than just the Op.21 . . . .
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Offline EigenUser

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #102 on: August 08, 2014, 12:24:02 PM »
Well, you've got to hope that there is more on that CD than just the Op.21 . . . .
These would be perfect for Webern:

Beethoven's Op. 133 -- A fugue so bad that even Beethoven himself called it "Grosse".

Offline Artem

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #103 on: April 12, 2015, 01:25:12 PM »
How is his Webern?

Offline Uhor

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #104 on: January 30, 2016, 04:58:17 PM »
Webern's clear methods are a stepping stone in music ever since.

Op. 6 Six Pieces for large orchestra shows in it's richness the importance of absorbing Debussy and some help from late Mahler

Op. 21 Symphony, the momentousness of Renaissance technique.

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #105 on: February 20, 2017, 01:40:18 AM »
I would give Webern a big hug if I could, his music is so emotionally fulfilling; very personally significant composer to me!

As well, very intellectually intriguing, inspiring and valuable...but lets not dwell on his innovations  :P


This is the kind of peace with life, nature and zen it gives me:  :-*


Offline snyprrr

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #106 on: February 20, 2017, 08:44:30 AM »
I find the Op. 1 Passacaglia extraordinarily gripping and disturbing. It's like a late Mahler symphony condensed into 10 minutes.

time to break out the Webern...
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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #107 on: March 16, 2017, 02:15:04 AM »
I'll just bump this thread because I really can't state my admiration and passion for Webern's music enough. Absolute genius, innovative.

The music affects me in many ways and has an intense but also very restrained sense of emotional and spiritual overdrive.
Some of his works are incredibly heavy and dissonant, other works are very meditative and transcendent.

He balanced many ideas that would become highly important to a lot of post-1945s? composers.

Almost every single work I look at, there are concepts and allusions to many massive techniques etc etc. His work is a goldmine, and perfect for valentines day  :D

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #108 on: March 26, 2017, 10:23:19 PM »
The sensual world of colors in Webern's music:



and the spiritual:




It's all good!  8)

Offline Monsieur Croche

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #109 on: March 26, 2017, 10:51:48 PM »
for the image you seek, maybe Odilon Redon got it all in one....
~ I'm all for personal expression; it just has to express something to me. ~

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #110 on: August 11, 2017, 11:30:03 PM »
Call it what you will but I think Webern's Op 9 & 10 are the two most important early 20th century works. More important that The Rite of spring, Jeux or Schoenberg's Five Pieces for Orchestra.


What is it about Webern? there's always something almost God-like about his work  ???


(I would also mention Op 5 & 6, also both a SQ and orchestra work but they're both slightly more rooted in tradition, despite their innovations)

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #111 on: August 12, 2017, 03:02:02 AM »
Call it what you will but I think Webern's Op 9 & 10 are the two most important early 20th century works. More important that The Rite of spring, Jeux or Schoenberg's Five Pieces for Orchestra.

Well?  And what makes the Webern more important than these landmarks in the literature?  You should know that the discussion is always more interesting than the assertion (because, you know, the assertion may just be dead wrong8)


(Fixed a typo.)
« Last Edit: August 13, 2017, 04:58:38 AM by k a rl h e nn i ng »
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. Franoise Gilot

Offline snyprrr

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #112 on: August 12, 2017, 08:26:29 AM »
Call it what you will but I think Webern's Op 9 & 10 are the two most important early 20th century works. More important that The Rite of spring, Jeux or Schoenberg's Five Pieces for Orchestra.


What is it about Webern? there's always something almost God-like about his work  ???


(I would also mention Op 5 & 6, also both a SQ and orchestra work but they're both slightly more rooted in tradition, despite their innovations)

Baggy-tales and 5 Pieces... I'll take them to work today.... lol, less than 10 minutes of music...
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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #113 on: August 12, 2017, 08:51:21 PM »
Baggy-tales and 5 Pieces... I'll take them to work today.... lol, less than 10 minutes of music...

I listened to Op 10 on loop for over an hour on loop this morning without realizing it.

One of the many amazing things about Webern, is that if you pay different levels of attention to the same piece, it sounds like another piece   :laugh:

Offline α |

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #114 on: August 12, 2017, 08:55:33 PM »
Well?  And what makes the Webern more important than these landmarks in the literature?  You should know that the discussion is almost more interesting than the assertion (because, you know, the assertion may just be dead wrong8)

IMO with everything dude  :laugh:

In terms of time period, approach/technique, stylistic longevity (or predicting the distant future?), I say those two Webern pieces are like a time capsule sent from the future.

Unlike Stravinsky and Schoenberg, Webern really doesn't sound like the music of his time to me, there's just really something off about his innovations. It really doesn't sound like music someone (even an innovative composer) would write in 1910, you feelin' me?  ???

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #115 on: August 13, 2017, 04:58:45 AM »
Well?  And what makes the Webern more important than these landmarks in the literature?  You should know that the discussion is always more interesting than the assertion (because, you know, the assertion may just be dead wrong8)

(Fixed a typo.)
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. Franoise Gilot

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #116 on: August 13, 2017, 05:02:00 AM »
Unlike Stravinsky and Schoenberg, Webern really doesn't sound like the music of his time to me, there's just really something off about his innovations. It really doesn't sound like music someone (even an innovative composer) would write in 1910, you feelin' me?  ???

That's quite possibly true; I suppose I am still waiting for the explanation of why this makes it of greater importance than Le sacre, Jeux, or the Schoenberg Op.16   0:)
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. Franoise Gilot

Offline snyprrr

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #117 on: August 13, 2017, 08:42:31 AM »
I listened to Op 10 on loop for over an hour on loop this morning without realizing it.

One of the many amazing things about Webern, is that if you pay different levels of attention to the same piece, it sounds like another piece   :laugh:

It's too long. Try Ives!



























Naw dawg, that wuz jus 4 da lolz!!! :laugh:


Op.10 (Abbado/DG)

I could have sworn the big Webern orchestral piece was on that Levine disc, but, huh, wait, what is this?, has Op.10 kind of just slipped under the radar? I guess I thought I was hearing an orchestral version of one of the SQs, but, again, I might have been confusing with Schoenberg (all the Webern discs I have seem to have Schoenberg and Berg also, bla bla)...

So, on it goes...


Yes, very crystalline, with the "tinkle instrument", oh what is that celesta, glock, vibe, chimes??... all those timbres confuse me, also my most beloved... oh, the tinkle!,...

Then,... there's an outburst...


Wait,... we're already half way through,... I can't tell the changes,... all sounds... very rarified European black forests,... empty town with three souls,... night,... "A Clean, Well Lit Place" with no people,... lots of tinkle,...


OK, now we're into the Bach thing, (Variations)couldn't tell the dif, lol,...



I dunno, I listened a few times,... yes, extraordinarily crystalline, the most for it's time,... but,... poof!,... it's over,...  lol, I almost felt cheated, like a bad hand job ??? :o ???


PROLIFERATION IS THE KEY!!



Sounds like Kurtag :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:



Now I have no idea what to take today???......!!....?....!.... quick quick, only 5mins to choose..............??...gotta Post....
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Offline α |

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #118 on: August 13, 2017, 03:43:40 PM »
Beep. Beep. Bop. Beep. Beep.  :laugh:



Yeah the orchestral works, off memory:


Op1 Passacaglia (I love it but don't come back to it much because it's not the Webern I love, it's the Mahler I love   :D )
Op 6 (One of the first true modernist works, historically taking over from Schoenberg's Op 16)
Op 10 (Completely unprecedented music sent from the year 3196, to save earth from another potential nuclear war)
Op 21 (The greatest symphony of all time IMO, Bach would be honored to know this work, I know that for a fact. All the mirror-inversions and reversed phrases/repetitions are scary. 2nd movement gets me everytime with it's heaviness, sort of like a mini condensed Gruppen?)
Das Augenlicht (Another sort of future-esque adventure, but more like encountering angels for real. This doubles as a choral work, so I'm not sure, would you include it?)
Op 30 (Yeah, sort of a older and wiser extension of Op 10 in a way but this is microscopic development and variation at its finest and most extreme....before Darmstadt anyway..)

The two cantatas would count too I guess (though they're also choral works too). Both Cantatas (op 29 and 31 are incredible but would require more time to discuss, Op 31 is one of the most under-appreciated godsends of all time IMO, IMO I know  ::)


Offline Omicron9

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Re: Webern's Vibe
« Reply #119 on: August 25, 2017, 09:50:48 AM »
My first exposure to Webern (now one of my very favorite composers) was the LaSalle quartet's recording of "Five Movements for string quartet," op. 5.  My mouth fell open at the col legno chords at the very beginning.  I still get almost knocked over every time I hear it.

The Boulez box on DG is wondrous.  As is the LaSalle quartet box set of the 2nd Viennese School on DG.  Vital.

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