Poll

Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?

YES
3 (14.3%)
NO
17 (81%)
NO OPINION
1 (4.8%)

Total Members Voted: 18

Voting closed: January 20, 2018, 07:32:58 PM

Author Topic: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?  (Read 4005 times)

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Offline amw

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #80 on: March 31, 2019, 06:29:56 PM »
Of course Holst is a one hit wonder. So is Mozart, with Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, and Bach (BWV 565).
Some composers are zero-hit wonders. Brahms and Schubert (name any work by either that has the name recognition of Planets or EKN) for example.
Beethoven probably scores highest, with as many as four: Symphonies 5 and 9 (distilled into the opening of the first movement, and the last movement, respectively), the first movement of the Moonlight Sonata,  and Fur Elise.
Brahms has the lullaby from op.49 which is definitely a hit. I think Bach also has a second hit in the form of the Minuet in G (which unlike BWV 565 is probably by him).

Offline JBS

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #81 on: March 31, 2019, 06:52:41 PM »
I seem to gave missed the Lullaby completely. I may have never even heard it before now!

I think the Hungarian Dances would be a better claimant. 
Speaking of which, in connection with the "hits not actually written by the composer who is famous for it" subthread

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Only numbers 11, 14 and 16 are entirely original compositions. The better-known Hungarian Dances include Nos. 1 and 5, the latter which was based on the csárdás "Bártfai emlék" (Memories of Bártfa) by Hungarian composer Béla Kéler, which Brahms mistakenly thought was a traditional folksong.[3] A footnote on the Ludwig-Masters edition of a modern orchestration of Hungarian Dance No.1 states: "The material for this dance is believed to have come from the Divine Csárdás (ca. 1850) of Hungarian composer and conductor Miska Borzó."

(From https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_Dances_(Brahms) )

Offline Daverz

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #82 on: March 31, 2019, 07:08:19 PM »
Of course Holst is a one hit wonder. So is Mozart, with Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, and Bach (BWV 565).
Some composers are zero-hit wonders. Brahms and Schubert (name any work by either that has the name recognition of Planets or EKN) for example.
Beethoven probably scores highest, with as many as four: Symphonies 5 and 9 (distilled into the opening of the first movement, and the last movement, respectively), the first movement of the Moonlight Sonata,  and Fur Elise.

Schubert: Ave Maria

Offline Irons

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #83 on: March 31, 2019, 11:42:47 PM »
Of course Holst is a one hit wonder. So is Mozart, with Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, and Bach (BWV 565).
Some composers are zero-hit wonders. Brahms and Schubert (name any work by either that has the name recognition of Planets or EKN) for example.
Beethoven probably scores highest, with as many as four: Symphonies 5 and 9 (distilled into the opening of the first movement, and the last movement, respectively), the first movement of the Moonlight Sonata,  and Fur Elise.

Being pedantic, how can you be a one hit wonder with four? The Jupiter symphony must be up there with Eine Kleine. Schubert has the "Trout" and I wish I had a £1 for every playing of the Adagio of his String Quintet on "Desert Island Discs".
And behind the slime and the croaking there was , sure enough, like an old master beneath a layer of dirt, the noble outline of that divine music. - Hermann Hesse, Steppenwolf.

Offline Jo498

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #84 on: March 31, 2019, 11:51:19 PM »
The Planets is not close to being a "ringtone hit" or "classics of the movies", so the comparisons are lopsided.

There are at least two or three dozens of "ringtone hits" far better known than the Planets (I myself would probably not recognize some of the "Planets" besides Mars and Jupiter). E.g. by Bach at least the "Air", the badinerie from the flute suite, probably also Jesus, Joy, Sleepers awake, the beginning of the 3rd Brandenburg and probably a few more.

More apt comparisons for the Planets would be one hit wonders that are major works but not quite ringtone hits like the already mentioned Pictures of an Exhibition or Weber's Freischütz. I think Holst is in pretty good company there.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Florestan

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #85 on: April 01, 2019, 12:47:52 AM »
Some composers are zero-hit wonders. Brahms and Schubert (name any work by either that has the name recognition of Planets or EKN) for example.

Brahms: Hungarian Dance No. 5.
Schubert: Ave Maria.
“Beauty must appeal to the senses, must provide us with immediate enjoyment, must impress us or insinuate itself into us without any effort on our part." --- Claude Debussy

Offline Biffo

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #86 on: April 01, 2019, 12:52:27 AM »
Brahms: Hungarian Dance No. 5.
Schubert: Ave Maria.

Brahms - No - I would probably recognise it as one of the Hungarian Dances but not know the number
Schubert - Yes but there would be lingering uncertainty as to whether it wasn't that other syrupy confection already mentioned.

Offline Florestan

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Re: Is Gustav Holst a one hit wonder with THE PLANETS?
« Reply #87 on: April 01, 2019, 01:17:48 AM »
Brahms - No - I would probably recognise it as one of the Hungarian Dances but not know the number

It doesn't matter whether one would know the number --- or even the composer; what matters is that this particular Hungarian Dance is known worldwide, probably much more known than The Planets.

Quote
Schubert - Yes but there would be lingering uncertainty as to whether it wasn't that other syrupy confection already mentioned.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ave_Maria_(Schubert)



“Beauty must appeal to the senses, must provide us with immediate enjoyment, must impress us or insinuate itself into us without any effort on our part." --- Claude Debussy