Author Topic: Langgaard's Lyre  (Read 68290 times)

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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #620 on: October 13, 2018, 06:55:25 AM »
[...]  So in some of Langgaard's works, you have a feeling of "but I can do that too".

This. I wonder where his musical mind would've taken him if he wasn't handicapped by jealousness.

This feels like eisogesis rather than exegesis, to this listener/composer.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Brian

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #621 on: November 13, 2018, 07:59:12 PM »
Is the Dacapo symphony box a space saver box with sleeves or 7 plastic jewel cases in a paper case?

Offline North Star

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #622 on: November 13, 2018, 11:40:22 PM »
Is the Dacapo symphony box a space saver box with sleeves or 7 plastic jewel cases in a paper case?
Sleeves.
"Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it." - Confucius

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Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #623 on: November 15, 2018, 09:03:23 AM »
Is the Dacapo symphony box a space saver box with sleeves or 7 plastic jewel cases in a paper case?

Space saving, yes, definitely. Sleeves? No. It's a totally ingenious -- well, very fancy -- little fan-system. Not simply sleeves, though.

Offline Biffo

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #624 on: November 15, 2018, 09:10:36 AM »
Space saving, yes, definitely. Sleeves? No. It's a totally ingenious -- well, very fancy -- little fan-system. Not simply sleeves, though.

My Dacapo box of the symphonies has the discs in cardboard sleeves, nothing ingenious.

Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #625 on: November 15, 2018, 11:26:15 AM »
My Dacapo box of the symphonies has the discs in cardboard sleeves, nothing ingenious.

What?? You got gypped.

Doesn't look like this?


Online cilgwyn

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #626 on: November 16, 2018, 05:29:16 AM »
I must admit,I've never seen one like that before! (I must get out more?!! ::) ;D)

Offline North Star

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #627 on: November 16, 2018, 06:55:46 AM »
Space saving, yes, definitely. Sleeves? No. It's a totally ingenious -- well, very fancy -- little fan-system. Not simply sleeves, though.
Ah yes, I'd forgotten about the intricacies of the construction. But the simple answer is: BUY IT!
"Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it." - Confucius

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Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #628 on: May 05, 2019, 08:28:02 PM »


It's been my first complete listen to the Sinfonia interna, and I have to say that this possesses sublime beauty, the most mystical and mellifluous side of this composer in complete display. The music is thoroughly enchanting, lyrical at its best. Here there is an extract from a review taken from MusicWeb:

"The history of Sinfonia Interna is complicated but can be summarised as follows. Sinfonia Interna was originally to have been Langgaard's Fourth Symphony. It is not to be confused with the Løvfald Symphony - the authorised number 4. It was completed in 1915-16 as a large scale 'stage symphony' in five sections uniting text, music and stage elements. Its grand scheme was Scriabinesque - designed under the influence of Theosophy to produce a transcendental, religious, mystical effect. It was discarded when a performance could not be secured. Its material resurfaced in other free-standing works. In the 1940s the composer considered reconstructing the sinfonia in a shortened form but without stage elements. This disc is an attempt to fulfil that proposal from original material all brought together by the world authority on Langgaard Bendt Viinholt Nielsen with reconstruction work done by Mike Cholewa.

...

The writing is luminous, never congested - a naturally legato, usually slow, following the undulations of some serenely beautiful inner landscape. The music also prompts memories of Delius's Village Romeo and Juliet - Act I. There are some operatic incursions to provide variety although I found that these segments did not fully convince. In the final Epilog you can hear the linkages between Delius (say Summer Night on the River) and the Danish musical heritage.

This is, quite simply, a glorious work, gloriously performed and resplendently recorded. A success on every count. Now how about, for just this once, shelving Elgar's Sea Pictures or Wagner's Wesendonck Lieder or Strauss's Four Last Songs and giving this Langgaard work a chance?
"

Once again, I like the connection and/or scope Langgaard tried to give his music, with the transcendental thing being a strong inspiration. It lets to see a spiritual man who wanted to write beautiful music, often inspired by God or religion, far from the extreme modernisms of the age. I wish he had lived longer and with much more recognition.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #629 on: May 06, 2019, 06:05:15 AM »


It's been my first complete listen to the Sinfonia interna, and I have to say that this possesses sublime beauty, the most mystical and mellifluous side of this composer in complete display. The music is thoroughly enchanting, lyrical at its best. Here there is an extract from a review taken from MusicWeb:

"The history of Sinfonia Interna is complicated but can be summarised as follows. Sinfonia Interna was originally to have been Langgaard's Fourth Symphony. It is not to be confused with the Løvfald Symphony - the authorised number 4. It was completed in 1915-16 as a large scale 'stage symphony' in five sections uniting text, music and stage elements. Its grand scheme was Scriabinesque - designed under the influence of Theosophy to produce a transcendental, religious, mystical effect. It was discarded when a performance could not be secured. Its material resurfaced in other free-standing works. In the 1940s the composer considered reconstructing the sinfonia in a shortened form but without stage elements. This disc is an attempt to fulfil that proposal from original material all brought together by the world authority on Langgaard Bendt Viinholt Nielsen with reconstruction work done by Mike Cholewa.

...

The writing is luminous, never congested - a naturally legato, usually slow, following the undulations of some serenely beautiful inner landscape. The music also prompts memories of Delius's Village Romeo and Juliet - Act I. There are some operatic incursions to provide variety although I found that these segments did not fully convince. In the final Epilog you can hear the linkages between Delius (say Summer Night on the River) and the Danish musical heritage.

This is, quite simply, a glorious work, gloriously performed and resplendently recorded. A success on every count. Now how about, for just this once, shelving Elgar's Sea Pictures or Wagner's Wesendonck Lieder or Strauss's Four Last Songs and giving this Langgaard work a chance?
"

Once again, I like the connection and/or scope Langgaard tried to give his music, with the transcendental thing being a strong inspiration. It lets to see a spiritual man who wanted to write beautiful music, often inspired by God or religion, far from the extreme modernisms of the age. I wish he had lived longer and with much more recognition.
It has possibly the most beautiful opening of any work I know.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #630 on: May 07, 2019, 12:50:04 PM »
It has possibly the most beautiful opening of any work I know.

I couldn't disagree with it.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #631 on: May 07, 2019, 04:23:46 PM »


It's been my first complete listen to the Sinfonia interna, and I have to say that this possesses sublime beauty, the most mystical and mellifluous side of this composer in complete display. The music is thoroughly enchanting, lyrical at its best. Here there is an extract from a review taken from MusicWeb:

"The history of Sinfonia Interna is complicated but can be summarised as follows. Sinfonia Interna was originally to have been Langgaard's Fourth Symphony. It is not to be confused with the Løvfald Symphony - the authorised number 4. It was completed in 1915-16 as a large scale 'stage symphony' in five sections uniting text, music and stage elements. Its grand scheme was Scriabinesque - designed under the influence of Theosophy to produce a transcendental, religious, mystical effect. It was discarded when a performance could not be secured. Its material resurfaced in other free-standing works. In the 1940s the composer considered reconstructing the sinfonia in a shortened form but without stage elements. This disc is an attempt to fulfil that proposal from original material all brought together by the world authority on Langgaard Bendt Viinholt Nielsen with reconstruction work done by Mike Cholewa.

...

The writing is luminous, never congested - a naturally legato, usually slow, following the undulations of some serenely beautiful inner landscape. The music also prompts memories of Delius's Village Romeo and Juliet - Act I. There are some operatic incursions to provide variety although I found that these segments did not fully convince. In the final Epilog you can hear the linkages between Delius (say Summer Night on the River) and the Danish musical heritage.

This is, quite simply, a glorious work, gloriously performed and resplendently recorded. A success on every count. Now how about, for just this once, shelving Elgar's Sea Pictures or Wagner's Wesendonck Lieder or Strauss's Four Last Songs and giving this Langgaard work a chance?
"

Once again, I like the connection and/or scope Langgaard tried to give his music, with the transcendental thing being a strong inspiration. It lets to see a spiritual man who wanted to write beautiful music, often inspired by God or religion, far from the extreme modernisms of the age. I wish he had lived longer and with much more recognition.

One of my favorites
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Langgaard's Lyre
« Reply #632 on: May 08, 2019, 02:23:30 PM »
One of my favorites

Mine too! I listened to it again, and my sentiments were reaffirmed.