Author Topic: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)  (Read 116715 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Maciek

  • Ban them all!
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 5198
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #20 on: April 07, 2007, 12:04:57 PM »




That's the only one I have. Should I be looking for anything more?

Offline BachQ

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5798
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #21 on: April 07, 2007, 12:06:03 PM »
I don’t know why I haven’t purchased this yet (Brahms Sym 2 with Kleiber/VPO on DVD):



Some reviews by GMGers

Kleiber Brahms 2nd Symphony DVD

Kleiber Brahms 2nd Symphony DVD

The Amazon reviews are even more glowing . . . . . . .


Mozart

  • Guest
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #22 on: April 07, 2007, 12:09:48 PM »
Brahms was a sexy bitch until he grew that beard.




Offline BachQ

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5798
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #23 on: April 07, 2007, 12:11:28 PM »
2007 DVD of Brahms Double Concerto:



Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, Gidon Kremer, Guiseppe Sinopoli, Marta Sudraba (released February 27, 2007)


Offline BachQ

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5798
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #24 on: April 07, 2007, 12:12:42 PM »
Brahms was a sexy bitch until he grew that beard.

Too bad Mozart was never able to grow a beard . . . . . .  :D

Offline Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 14166
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #25 on: April 07, 2007, 12:17:32 PM »
That's the only one I have. Should I be looking for anything more?

It was my first and I'm still satisfied with it. It's my only recording with Perlman, so that says something.. ;D

But I like the Suk/Navarra and the Schneiderhan/Starker also very much - either one is recommended if you're looking for a different angle.

Q
« Last Edit: April 07, 2007, 12:21:22 PM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Offline Maciek

  • Ban them all!
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 5198
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #26 on: April 07, 2007, 12:20:15 PM »
No, I really like it. Just wanted to make sure... ;D

Offline Guido

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3322
  • 396 CCs
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #27 on: April 07, 2007, 03:49:03 PM »
Is the Rostropovich/Perlman as good as the Rostropovich/Oistrakh?
Geologist.

The large print giveth, and the small print taketh away

Offline Scott

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 69
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #28 on: April 07, 2007, 06:48:47 PM »
Does my avatar tell you how I feel about Brahms?
Without music, life would be a mistake. -- Nietzsche

Offline Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 14166
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #29 on: April 07, 2007, 07:58:11 PM »
Is the Rostropovich/Perlman as good as the Rostropovich/Oistrakh?

I like it much better.
But I'm in a minority: the Rostropovich/Perlman/Haitink is hardly ever mentioned, while the Rostropovich/Oistrakh/Szell is generally dubbed as a legendary recording. I was never impressed with the latter - same for the coupled LvB triple concerto BTW.

Q
« Last Edit: April 07, 2007, 08:37:35 PM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Mozart

  • Guest
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #30 on: April 07, 2007, 10:43:55 PM »
Does my avatar tell you how I feel about Brahms?

Does mine?

Offline BachQ

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5798
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #31 on: April 08, 2007, 03:32:22 AM »
Does my avatar tell you how I feel about Brahms?

Your avatar has us asking for MORE . . . . . .  For example, are there any recordings that you keep turning to?  Any recordings that "nail it, hands down" ?

Offline Novi

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1206
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #32 on: April 08, 2007, 04:29:18 AM »
Brahms is right up there amongst my favourites.

The Carlos Kleiber 4th was what first got me into Brahms's works and it's still one of my favourites among all symphonies. I've been getting to know the other ones a bit better recently (Walter, both NYPO and ColSO).

I also love the D minor piano concerto. In fact, this work was what got me interested in the genre itself. Fleisher/Szell was my first recording and I still like this very much, but for a more expansive reading, I go to Arrau/Giulini. The B flat concerto took a while longer but I'm really enjoying it as well these days. Here, it's Richter/Leinsdorf all the way. Amazing performance from Richter.

Solo piano: I don't have many recordings to compare with, but Lupu in the Intermezzi, Michelangeli's Ballades. Also Fleisher's Handel Variations. Again, these took some time for me to get into.

Chamber: as far as I remember, I think Brahms's various trios were the first chamber works aside from string quartets that I started listening to. The horn trio was a revelation - I never realised what a beautiful sound the horn could be until then.   

Durch alle Töne tönet
Im bunten Erdentraum
Ein leiser Ton gezogen
Für den der heimlich lauschet.

Offline Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 14166
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #33 on: April 08, 2007, 04:44:33 AM »
Chamber: as far as I remember, I think Brahms's various trios were the first chamber works aside from string quartets that I started listening to. The horn trio was a revelation - I never realised what a beautiful sound the horn could be until then.   

Brahms wrote the trio for natural horn. For another revelation I can recommend a recording with that - if you not already haven't got it, of course! :)

Try this with Lowel Greer, first issued on Harmonia Mundi. Very nice coupling with Beethoven. Ridiculously cheap BTW. The phrase on the cover: "absolutely gorgeous" is true for a change.. 8)



Q

P.S. Forgot to mention that this means that it is a HIP recording - with period instruments. So a fortepiano (Steven Lubin) and a violin with gut strings (Stepanie Chase) is included in the deal. But you'll see how marvelous that works in terms of balance between the instruments and the sound picture.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2007, 07:32:53 AM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Offline Novi

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1206
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #34 on: April 08, 2007, 07:48:01 AM »
Brahms wrote the trio for natural horn. For another revelation I can recommend a recording with that - if you not already haven't got it, of course! :)

Try this with Lowel Greer, first issued on Harmonia Mundi. Very nice coupling with Beethoven. Ridiculously cheap BTW. The phrase on the cover: "absolutely gorgeous" is true for a change.. 8)



Q

P.S. Forgot to mention that this means that it is a HIP recording - with period instruments. So a fortepiano (Steven Lubin) and a violin with gut strings (Stepanie Chase) is included in the deal. But you'll see how marvelous that works in terms of balance between the instruments and the sound picture.

Thanks for the recommendation, Que. No issues at all with HIP and period instruments 8).

In fact, I'd been looking for another recording since I've only the BAT and friends Philips 2fer. I'd been looking at Brain/Busch/Serkin on Pearl with the Clarinet quintet (Kell), which I will probably get one of these days, but the Greer one is obviously very different and I'm keen to hear a natural horn version. You're right - it's ridiculously cheap. I'm just waiting for JPC to deliver now :).
Durch alle Töne tönet
Im bunten Erdentraum
Ein leiser Ton gezogen
Für den der heimlich lauschet.

Offline BachQ

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5798
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #35 on: April 08, 2007, 08:04:57 AM »
I also love the D minor piano concerto. In fact, this work was what got me interested in the genre itself. Fleisher/Szell was my first recording and I still like this very much, but for a more expansive reading, I go to Arrau/Giulini. The B flat concerto took a while longer but I'm really enjoying it as well these days. Here, it's Richter/Leinsdorf all the way. Amazing performance from Richter.

You're a marvelous, wonderful person . . . . . . .  8)

Offline DetUudslukkelige

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 49
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #36 on: April 08, 2007, 08:19:59 AM »
I love his symphonies - the fourth is one of my all time favorites, particularly the Furtwängler and Toscanini recordings, in spite of the dated sound. Ein Deutsches Requiem, in addition, is one of my top 5 favorite musical works period (Klemperer is my favorite here).

Still, I see Brahms also as a Lieder composer. Anyone here heard Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau's five-disc set of assorted Brahms lieder? I have fallen in love with several of these, like "Von Ewiger Liebe/ Of eternal love", and I honestly never knew a human voice could carry such emotion. Anyone else a fan of Brahms lieder and know of good recordings?
-DetUudslukkelige

"My heart, which is so full to overflowing, has often been solaced and refreshed by music when sick and weary." - Martin Luther

Offline BachQ

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5798
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #37 on: April 08, 2007, 08:50:46 AM »
Brahms Violin Concerto

For an excellent summary (with brief review) of recordings of Brahms’ Violin Concerto, CLICK HERE for Harry Collier’s thread

Other GMG links:

     --      Brahms VC Revisited by Rabin-Fan

     --      Brahms Violin Concerto

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5820
  • Posts: who's counting?
  • Currently Listening to:
    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #38 on: April 08, 2007, 09:13:04 AM »
Still, I see Brahms also as a Lieder composer. Anyone here heard Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau's five-disc set of assorted Brahms lieder?

Anyone else a fan of Brahms lieder and know of good recordings?

Brahms' lieder is vastly underrated...on par in quality to any songs I know.

It's a shame lieder (song) gets such scant attention from the public but the form hits home with me in a big way.

As far as recordings, I've heard parts of that Fischer-Dieskau set on Brilliant and agree it's fabulous!

Other recordings I enjoy are Lemieux on Analekta, Banse on CPO, and Von Otter on DG.

Oh, and not to forget the monumental Liebeslieder Walzes, Op.52 & 65. Works so good you'll almost forget about the symphonies! ;D







Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5820
  • Posts: who's counting?
  • Currently Listening to:
    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #39 on: April 08, 2007, 09:26:52 AM »
Vocal-wise, one could do worse than these fine works, as well:








Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Buying Music From Amazon?
Please consider using these links. A small percentage of every sale using these links is passed on to GMG and helps keep this forum online.
Amazon US
Amazon Canada
Amazon UK