Author Topic: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)  (Read 116934 times)

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Offline DetUudslukkelige

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #40 on: April 08, 2007, 11:06:36 AM »
Exzellent! Danke. I hadn't even considered many of those. Of course, with my limited budget for music, anything I add to my list of 'must hear' CDs (except impulse buys) has to work its way up through the enormous, mile-long list. I still daresay, however, that my current collection of Brahms music will last me until then. He's not the sort I bore of easily.

It's interesting that people don't see Brahms as a lied composer, considering he wrote what is one of the most famous Lieder of all (I speak, of course, of his famous Wiegenlied/Brahms' Lullaby).
-DetUudslukkelige

"My heart, which is so full to overflowing, has often been solaced and refreshed by music when sick and weary." - Martin Luther

Offline Que

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #41 on: April 08, 2007, 11:42:42 AM »
If you can get hold of this set with all the vocal ensembles, you'll reap the considerable rewards! :D
(Includes also the Liebeslieder-Walzer issue that was pictured in an earlier post)

Q

À chacun son goût.

Offline BachQ

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #42 on: April 09, 2007, 11:43:52 AM »

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #43 on: April 09, 2007, 07:52:47 PM »
If you can get hold of this set with all the vocal ensembles, you'll reap the considerable rewards! :D
(Includes also the Liebeslieder-Walzer issue that was pictured in an earlier post)

Q



That's a quality box, Que. It's part of that old DG complete Brahms edition issued years ago.

I just wish I could find it somewhere. It's been OOP for a good long time.

With artists like Schreier, Fassbaender, Fischer-Dieskau, et al, it'd be a perfect one-stop for the vocal ensembles.



Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Mozart

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #44 on: April 09, 2007, 09:45:26 PM »
I havent heard Brahms d min pc in months...like half a year and today I went to my Brahms folder and heard it. Shortly later it was on the radio! How weird is that?

Offline Maciek

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #45 on: April 11, 2007, 11:03:46 AM »
Because it is part of a set, I completely forgot about the Maisky-Kremer-Bernstein (WP) Double Concerto I have. From this set (also available separately, of course):



I love it.

Offline BachQ

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #46 on: April 11, 2007, 12:47:16 PM »
I havent heard Brahms d min pc in months...like half a year and today I went to my Brahms folder and heard it. Shortly later it was on the radio! How weird is that?

I'm still confounded by the fact that Brahms d minor piano concerto isn't played 24/7 (featuring various artists) by any given classical radio station in any given jurisdiction . . . . . . .  :o

karlhenning

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #47 on: April 11, 2007, 12:52:59 PM »
It's interesting that people don't see Brahms as a lied composer, considering he wrote what is one of the most famous Lieder of all (I speak, of course, of his famous Wiegenlied/Brahms' Lullaby).

Yes, the music-box industry is irrevocably in Brahms's debt!

Welcome, by the way!  Love your ID!

Offline BachQ

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #48 on: April 11, 2007, 12:58:30 PM »
Yes, welcome DetUudslukkelige !


greg

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #50 on: April 24, 2007, 10:56:32 AM »
Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 - Apr. 1897)

For me, Brahms is a "soul mate" composer.  Much (but not all) of his music touches me very deeply on every level: spiritually, emotionally, intellectually, and even physically.  His greatest works not only withstand repeated listening, but they acquire a greater, deeper significance over time.  For links to Brahms Bios, Click Here

  For a GMG Brahms Bio Thread, Click Here

Currently, my dozen favorite works are, (roughly in order):

1.   Piano Concerto no. 1 in d minor (op 15)
2.   Symphony no. 4
3.   Piano Concerto no. 2 in b flat (op 73)
4.   Requiem
5.   Violin Concerto
6.   Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Handel (op 24)
7.   Symphony no. 3
8.   Symphony no. 1
9.   Paganini Variations
10.   Piano Quartet op. 25 (and as orch. by Schoenberg)
11.   Clarinet Quintet
12.   Symphony no. 2

The list of other masterpieces is considerable, including (this list is a work-in-progress):

     --     Double Concerto
     --     Symphony no. 2
     --     Haydn Variations
     --     Overtures (Tragic / Academic Festival)
     --     Late Piano Pieces
     --     Sonatas for Piano 1/2/3
     --     Variations (on original theme; on a theme by Schumann)
     --     Alto Rhapsody
     --     Triumphlied
     --     Lieder
     --     Sonatas for Violin
     --     Sonatas for Cello
     --     Sonata for Clarinet
     --     String Quartets
     --     Piano Quartets
     --     Piano Quintet
     --     Trios (horn trio)
     --     Motets
     --     Organ Works
     --     Serenades

Johannes Brahms Links

Grove Dictionary of Music

List of Works

johannesbrahms.org

American Brahms Society

Classical Music Archives

Classical.net

Brahms Museum

Links to Biographies of Brahms

i should listen to more Brahms again, this is a good reminder  :)

Offline BachQ

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #51 on: April 24, 2007, 11:15:38 AM »
i should listen to more Brahms again, this is a good reminder  :)

Brahms infusion is a near-daily event for me . . . . . . But do post your impressions and reactions, Greg . . . . .  8)

karlhenning

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #52 on: April 24, 2007, 11:26:38 AM »
Give us this day our daily Brahms . . . .

Offline BachQ

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #53 on: April 24, 2007, 11:48:53 AM »
Give us this day our daily Brahms . . . .

Précisément!

DavidW

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #54 on: April 24, 2007, 05:59:33 PM »
Okay I'm going to fly my "geek flag" here but the Brahms Sextet was used in a Next Generation episode called "Sarek" in which the Vulcan cries at a ship concert.  There are two excerpts during the scene, one from the 1st mvt of Mozart's Dissonance SQ, and the other from the 2nd mvt of the Brahms.  Its a rather good scene and it actually has no dialogue for about two minutes while the music is playing.

I remember that.  Darned senile vulcan!  Didn't he mind meld with Picard at the end of that episode?  I don't remember the Brahms from that scene, but I do remember the Mozart. :)

hornteacher

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #55 on: April 24, 2007, 06:15:35 PM »
I remember that.  Darned senile vulcan!  Didn't he mind meld with Picard at the end of that episode?  I don't remember the Brahms from that scene, but I do remember the Mozart. :)

Yep, that's the one.  The Brahms is what actually is playing durng the "tear".  Interestingly, even though its a string SEXTET there are still only FOUR people playing!

DavidW

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #56 on: April 24, 2007, 06:23:33 PM »
Yep, that's the one.  The Brahms is what actually is playing durng the "tear".  Interestingly, even though its a string SEXTET there are still only FOUR people playing!

See proof positive that the impact of Brahms on anyone is overwhelming.  Even brings a Vulcan to tears. ;D  Was Data one of the four, because he could play for three? :D

hornteacher

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #57 on: April 24, 2007, 06:26:12 PM »
Was Data one of the four, because he could play for three? :D

Good point.

Offline BachQ

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #58 on: April 24, 2007, 06:37:49 PM »
Brahms actually came to life on the classic Star Trek episode titled "Requiem for Methuselah".

In 2269, the immortal Flint claimed that Johannes Brahms was one of his many identities, a claim supported by first officer Spock of the Federation starship USS Enterprise. During a visit to Holberg 917G, a planet owned and inhabited by Flint at that time, Spock found an unknown and recently written Brahms manuscript, which could only have been written by Flint. (TOS: "Requiem for Methuselah")



Spock playing a Brahms waltz with Flint/Brahms in the foreground



Also:

Geordi La Forge's "Moonlight on the Beach" holoprogram featured a gypsy violinist playing a Brahms Hungarian Dance No. 5. (TNG: "Booby Trap")

Data suggested playing a piece by Brahms to make Miles O'Brien feel more at home in Data's quarters when he visited the android seeking guidance concerning his proposed marriage with Keiko Ishikawa. (TNG: "Data's Day")

When Geordi La Forge wanted to impress Doctor Leah Brahms who was about to visit him in his quarters, he decided to play a Brahms piano etude, but changed his mind because he thought the idea was too corny. (TNG: "Galaxy's Child")

(from Trek Wiki)

Offline val

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Re: Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
« Reply #59 on: April 25, 2007, 12:51:33 AM »
I love Brahms music. After Beethoven, Bach, Mozart and Wagner I would chose Brahms among my 5 favorite composers.

Above all I love his chamber music:
The 3 violin sonatas, the clarinet sonata opus 120/1 and the version for viola of the opus 120/2, the piano Trios, the Horn Trio, the First and 3rd piano Quartets, the 2 string quintets, the First Sextet and, on the top, the extraordinary Quintets with piano and clarinet.

Also love some of his piano music: the 3rd Sonata, the Händel Variations, the last works (opus 116 to 119).   

For the rest, Ein Deutshes Requiem, Schicksalslied, the 2nd piano concerto, the violin concerto, the Tragic Overture, the double Concerto and the 4th Symphony.

The Lieder are not among my favorite works.

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