Author Topic: Philip Glass  (Read 30633 times)

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snyprrr

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #100 on: January 13, 2013, 06:54:01 PM »
 


Dueling new releases (only months apart) of Philip Glass performed on Harp. Who has the edge? Here's Sacchi in recital....

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/UQ8rY0TtsYM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/UQ8rY0TtsYM</a>


...but Meijer created a music video!!!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/_54NQciqofU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/_54NQciqofU</a>


Make it a clean fight, ladies, no hitting below the belt.  ;)

I was going to kvetch, but PG on harp doesn't sound too offensive.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #101 on: January 15, 2013, 09:38:24 AM »
Incidentally, the choir will be singing three choral pieces by Glass.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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Offline Cato

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #102 on: January 15, 2013, 09:44:35 AM »
Incidentally, the choir will be singing three choral pieces by Glass.

How repetitious are they?   ;)
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #103 on: January 15, 2013, 09:46:12 AM »
Incidentally, the choir will be singing three choral pieces by Glass.

I hope you bring a barf bag along with you. ;) :D
"Music should be able to invoke the natural emotions in all human beings. Music is not notes fixed on apiece of paper.” - Toru Takemitsu

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #104 on: January 15, 2013, 09:47:43 AM »
How repetitious are they?   ;)

Potentially, more. I think I've sung one of the three with the choir, and Paul has us sing each phrase just twice.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
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Offline TheGSMoeller

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Philip Glass
« Reply #105 on: January 15, 2013, 10:11:36 AM »
I hope you bring a barf bag along with you. ;) :D

Good point, the flu is going around.

Offline TheGSMoeller

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Philip Glass
« Reply #106 on: January 15, 2013, 10:12:46 AM »
Incidentally, the choir will be singing three choral pieces by Glass.

Could you list the pieces, Karl? Thank you!

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #107 on: February 04, 2013, 05:52:02 AM »


"The Poet Acts" on harp is now one of my top 3-4 favorite pieces by Glass.

My posting this here in the composer's thread is not directly to suggest any revision, mind you Brian : )

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/KZEq3Ro7mXU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/KZEq3Ro7mXU</a>
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http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
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Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #108 on: March 07, 2013, 08:26:30 PM »

Philip Glass: Orion
Philip Glass Ensemble - featuring Eleftheria Arvanitaki, Mark Atkins, Ashley MacIsaac, Wu Man, Gaurav Mazumdar, Foday Musa Suso, UAKTI and conductor Michael Riesman

Glass was commissioned by the Cultural Olympiad to compose a piece for the 2004 Olympics in Athens, Greece. The movements of the piece are collaborations with musicians and composers from Australia, China, Canada, The Gambia, Brazil, India and finally Greece. Each movement utilizes the style and instruments from its country it's representing. The final movement, Greece, along with its Greek influence, is a summation of all the previous movements. I am posting the final two movements, India and Greece, for your listening pleasure. I truly find this to be one of Glass' most successful compositions of the past 10-15 years and completely captured the essence of each country's character. Movement India is almost a direct descendant of Glass' earlier collaborations with Ravi Shankar, a driving rhythm filled with fabulous sitar playing (checkout the sitar's display of rockin-out at 6:53), an array of percussion and wordless voices. Greece is pure bliss, hints of folk, new-age, pop and classical. Each soloist from the previous movements are given another moment to shine, but it's the final minutes when all the countries, all the musicians are unified in what sounds like the world performing together with the one singular purpose.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/2temha_w78I" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/2temha_w78I</a>  <a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/94PY45nCvPA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/94PY45nCvPA</a>

Offline Octave

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #109 on: March 20, 2013, 11:59:14 AM »
[Overlong post, please skip at your pleasure.  I just ask, again, for best recommendations for the violin concerto, Symphony No. 3, and string quartets.  I mention some personal favorites.  I carp a little.  I wonder about John Coltrane and if he has a lot to answer for, poor brilliant obsessive fellow.]

Now listening to AKHNATEN; I'm alternating between agitated annoyance ('is this orchestration?') and happier excitement ('Dude!'); it's a typical Glass experience for me, except perhaps for a chunk of the earlier (pre-80s?) music, which I almost always like right away and really like after 30 minutes or more.  I do wish that he'd chosen another lifelong (?) fixation than the Coltrane arpeggios....good grief, of all the textures to be selected for iterative immortality.  A reaching back into a happy youth or a eureka moment?  His ratatouille?

I've just spent some time going through this thread, but I'd still like to risk redundancy by asking for a few recommendations for some next steps with Glass; two pressing interests (afaik) are the VIOLIN CONCERTO and SYMPHONY NO. 3 'HOURS': the former because I bumped into it employed as (what else?) the soundtrack to a film (LA MOUSTACHE), and was interested in several aspects of it, including a fretful high flute that it seems was recycled in the FOG OF WAR music and probably elsewhere.  I wanted to ask again if there was a preferable recording of the violin concerto?  At the bottom of page 2 of this thread, 'M forever' strongly praised the Kremer/Dohnányi/DG, which I was thinking of getting in its DG 20-21 reissue (w/Rorem and Bernstein) to avoid overlap with the Schnittke CG#5, which I have elsewhere; but no comparison was made with other performances, just an assertion of Kremer's contribution and the sound of the orchestra generally.  I am more attracted to the couplings on the Naxos disc (orchestral COMPANY etc) or yet another performance with the John Adams violin concerto in tow; but the quality of the violin concerto is my main interest.  Anyway, opinions would be welcomed!

The other interest was in SYMPHONY NO. 3, at least based on not really knowing any of his other symphonies and having heard several favorable accounts and some samples of the third.  Again the main thing is the performances, though I see a choice in coupings: various little pieces (Davies/Stuttgart), the Second Sympony (Alsop/Bournemouth), or the orchestral HOURS (Manson/Manitoba, the brand-new one on Orange Mountain).

I am also thinking of getting a 2cd of string quartet music by the catchily named and interesting group Brooklyn Rider, a couple of whose recordings I have liked. 

Any other recommendations would also be appreciated.  GSM-Greg recommended four items together at the bottom of page 4 which I might try out (ORION and the CONCERTO PROJECT VOL. 2 among them).  My favored points of reference are MUSIC WITH CHANGING PARTS (the 'original' in its Nonesuch reissue and also the new recording by Icebreaker), MUSIC IN TWELVE PARTS (most recently in its live recording), and some of the early 'hardcore' keyboard music.  My experiences with so much of the later music have been really hit or miss, but I think there's a chance I'll keep trying pieces out at least occasionally for as long as I continue to listen to music.  I am well ready for his music to stop showing up in motion pictures, though; it works too well.  Routinization is just the worst possible thing that could happen to music designed to fascinate.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2013, 02:21:09 PM by Octave »
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Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #110 on: March 20, 2013, 02:12:38 PM »

 I am more attracted to the couplings on the Naxos disc (orchestral COMPANY etc) or yet another performance with the John Adams violin concerto in tow; but the quality of the violin concerto is my main interest. 

The other interest was in SYMPHONY NO. 3, at least based on not really knowing any of his other symphonies and having heard several favorable accounts and some samples of the third.  Again the main thing is the performances, though I see a choice in coupings: various little pieces (Davies/Stuttgart), the Second Sympony (Alsop/Bournemouth), or the orchestral HOURS (Manson/Manitoba, the brand-new one on Orange Mountain).

I am also thinking of getting a 2cd of string quartet music by the catchily named and interesting group Brooklyn Rider, a couple of whose recordings I have liked. 

Any other recommendations would also be appreciated.  GSM-Greg recommended four items together at the bottom of page 4 which I might try out (ORION and the CONCERTO PROJECT VOL. 2 among them).  My favored points of reference are MUSIC WITH CHANGING PARTS (the 'original' in its Nonesuch reissue and also the new recording by Icebreaker), MUSIC IN TWELVE PARTS (most recently in its live recording), and some of the early 'hardcore' keyboard music.  My experiences with so much of the later music have been really hit or miss, but I think there's a chance I'll keep trying pieces out at least occasionally for as long as I continue to listen to music.  I am well ready for his music to stop showing up in motion pictures, though; it works too well.  Routinization is just the worst possible thing that could happen to music designed to fascinate.



Because of exactly what you said, the additional pieces are excellent, and it's inexpensive. But great performance all around.



 

Again, excellent couplings and performance. Glass has 9 numbered symphonies, and the 3rd is up there with the best. Typical Glass style written for a chamber string ensemble, every line is clear and defined. In fact, much of Glass' best works are for chamber groups or solo instrument. If you enjoy the 3rd I would suggest 8th or 9th, other purely orchestral works. If you feel ready to venture out a bit give the 5th a spin, it's a huge piece that utilizes a larger orchestra with choir and soloists.  Back to the disc of the 3rd with Davies/Stuggart. It has wonderful companions to the symphony, The Civil Wars is a fascinating piece, it blurs the line between orchestral work, opera and performance piece. This recording features a few of the interludes from The Civil Wars, and as far as I know only the fifth Act "The Rome Section" has been recorded otherwise. But it's great music, plus if you get the entire recorded fifth Act you can hear Laurie Anderson's spoken contribution, it's an amazing collaboration.

I just recently purchased the 3rd with the Manitoba Chamber Orchestra, it has better sound quality than the Nonesuch release without question. And the new pseudo-piano concerto from "The Hours" material is lovely.



 

For some earlier pieces, Dancepieces and Songs from Liquid Days have always been a few favorites. Liquid Days may be a turn off at first listen because they are Glass' attempt at creating pure songs. Dancepieces features five tracks from In the Upper Room (Choreographed by Twyla Tharp), the fifth track, Dance IX has long been my choice for a Philip Glass' anthem.



 

Orion is a must for Glass' fans. It demonstrates his successful ability to merge with other cultural sounds. And Uakti's (Brazilian instrumental group) disc performing Glass' music is a great example of how universal his sound is. Uakti creates such a mesmerizing tone, using unique percussive instruments and winds, it's also quite relaxing.

Offline Octave

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #111 on: March 20, 2013, 02:41:18 PM »
My thanks for the recommendations, Greg....very helpful!  Another item I'm interested in, which I forgot to mention, is EARLY VOICE with the epic earlier piece "Another Look at Harmony Part IV" [sic?]; at least one person at GMG recommended this disc highly, and based on a sample I think it will be right up my alley.

I also see that Orange Mountain issued the complete ballet IN THE UPPER ROOM as its own somewhat short disc, but a new (?) recordings with all acoustic instruments, no synthesizers; that sounds interesting to me. 

I also have vague memories of liking DANCES 1-5 a lot, but unless it's been reissued somewhere, it seems to be OOP and a bit more expensive than I'd like it to be.



I'm also curious about ITAIPU, in case you know it; I've just heard it shortlisted as a favorite by a couple friends.
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Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #112 on: March 20, 2013, 03:04:50 PM »

I also see that Orange Mountain issued the complete ballet IN THE UPPER ROOM as its own somewhat short disc, but a new (?) recordings with all acoustic instruments, no synthesizers; that sounds interesting to me. 


They are good regardless of how they are performed. I prefer the synthesizer/acoustic hybrid myself.

Dance IX: This is the performance from the Dancepieces album. My personal "Glass Anthem"

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/wPdLu8GQprE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/wPdLu8GQprE</a>


I'm also curious about ITAIPU, in case you know it; I've just heard it shortlisted as a favorite by a couple friends.


Glass: Itaipu - a very dramatic work.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ZNsVwBv_jcw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ZNsVwBv_jcw</a>

Offline Rinaldo

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #113 on: March 21, 2013, 04:46:23 AM »
 

Orion is a must for Glass' fans. It demonstrates his successful ability to merge with other cultural sounds. And Uakti's (Brazilian instrumental group) disc performing Glass' music is a great example of how universal his sound is. Uakti creates such a mesmerizing tone, using unique percussive instruments and winds, it's also quite relaxing.

Funny, I never warmed to Orion. It sounds like a cheap "best of" of Glass' tricks to me. Uakti on the other hand is simply beautiful and indeed very relaxing, without sounding like a new age CD that jumped out of a bargain bin.

As for Akhnaten, that one I deeply love. The music truly made an impact on me back when I first heard it and it still counts among my favourites across all genres. Satyagraha is beautiful as well (I wish the recent MET production will get a proper HD release) and well worth giving a shot, Octave. I hate the term "life-affirming" but with Satyagraha, I can almost feel Gandhi's humanism resonate through the music.

Offline Octave

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #114 on: March 21, 2013, 05:10:33 AM »
@Rinaldo: I already owned AKHNATEN before I read your namechecking of it elsewhere at GMG, but I had not listened to it (perils/advantages of glut), so thanks to you I finally heard it for the first time yesterday.  IIRC you champion Act II Scene ~4 "Hymn" as a highlight, and I liked it too.  I was not following the movements very closely while I listened, but another really striking passage for me was, iirc, the closing movement of the first disc, "Akhnaten and Nefertiti" with some beautiful singing.  If SATYAGRAHA is this good, I'm certain I'll be getting a copy soon.  Same with EINSTEIN (Tomato/Sony), regardless of my carping above or in the Listening thread....I will definitely try it again with my mind as open as I manage.

I think I saw a recent release of an even longer (than the Sony edition) edition of EINSTEIN, a 1984 live recording, ~217 minutes (quite a bit longer than the Tomato recording from 1979), only available as a OMM mp3 release via Itunes:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/philip-glass-einstein-on-beach/id559017137
I'm sure this old new to the Glassophiles, but I'd be curious to know how different it sounds.
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snyprrr

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #115 on: March 21, 2013, 06:40:57 AM »
Nooooo,... it's the Philip Glass Thread! :o,... I'm mmmmelting :'(, mmmelting :'(,...
aaaaaahhhhhhhhh put it back.... PUT IT BACK!!!!

kyjo

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #116 on: August 19, 2013, 06:44:12 PM »
Reposted from the "other" Glass thread:

Though I think Glass is overhyped and I don't listen to his music with much regularity, I enjoy a few of his works when I'm in the mood: Symphonies 2, 3, 8 and 9, Violin Concerto, Concerto for Sax Quartet, Concerto-Fantasy for Two Timpanists and Orchestra and Cello Concerto no. 1. I'm eager to hear his recent (2011) Symphony no. 10, as I have enjoyed his previous two works in the form quite a bit. They seem to have an almost Brucknerian grandiosity combined with, of course, the usual Glass trademarks. My favorite Glass work, though, is his Concerto-Fantasy for Two Timpanists and Orchestra, which is a rhythmically exhilarating piece that makes me wonder why composers don't write more timpani concertos. What are everyone's favorite Glass works?

Offline Pat B

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #117 on: August 19, 2013, 08:46:06 PM »
Though I think Glass is overhyped and I don't listen to his music with much regularity, I enjoy a few of his works when I'm in the mood: Symphonies 2, 3, 8 and 9, Violin Concerto, Concerto for Sax Quartet, Concerto-Fantasy for Two Timpanists and Orchestra and Cello Concerto no. 1. I'm eager to hear his recent (2011) Symphony no. 10, as I have enjoyed his previous two works in the form quite a bit. They seem to have an almost Brucknerian grandiosity combined with, of course, the usual Glass trademarks. My favorite Glass work, though, is his Concerto-Fantasy for Two Timpanists and Orchestra, which is a rhythmically exhilarating piece that makes me wonder why composers don't write more timpani concertos. What are everyone's favorite Glass works?

Einstein on the Beach is good, but in the first recording it is too long. I know the second recording is shorter, but I'm also an analog synth snob. ;)

I really like the 1st Violin Concerto (I have McDuffie). I listened to Symphonies 2 and 3 (Alsop) today for the first time. They will probably join my list.

But I think my favorites are the String Quartets (I have Kronos), especially 2 and 5. Their first recording of 2 was my introduction to Glass.

I have yet to hear the other symphonies -- 8 seems to be especially popular -- and the concerto for sax quartet.

Offline Rinaldo

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #118 on: August 20, 2013, 01:44:57 PM »
Favourite works? One of them is still ringing in my ears: Music in Twelve Parts, which was performed a few days ago here in Czech Republic. Amazing experience.

Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: Philip Glass
« Reply #119 on: August 22, 2013, 01:40:48 PM »
Philip Glass has re-teamed with filmmaker Godfrey Reggio, the new film is titled VISITORS. Here is the trailer.


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/s3w8cNgWtMI" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/s3w8cNgWtMI</a>