Author Topic: The Carter Corner  (Read 146032 times)

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Offline Mahlerian

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Re: The Carter Corner
« Reply #1480 on: October 26, 2016, 03:14:46 PM »
If a person can articulate it, I am actually more interested reading why a person likes Carter.

His music is lively, filled with witty turns of phrase and an ever-active texture.  He employs both the fractured textures of the Darmstadt avant-garde and the longer lines of his fellow Boulanger alumni, and in terms of character, his music embraces violence and serenity and the playful and the strident.

In short, his music embodies many of the qualities that make for great music, and I find personally that it is a pleasure and not merely a challenge to get to know one of his works.

Offline Archaic Torso of Apollo

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Re: The Carter Corner
« Reply #1481 on: October 26, 2016, 03:46:01 PM »
His music is lively, filled with witty turns of phrase and an ever-active texture.  He employs both the fractured textures of the Darmstadt avant-garde and the longer lines of his fellow Boulanger alumni, and in terms of character, his music embraces violence and serenity and the playful and the strident.

I agree with all of this. A few further comments. For me, Carter was a composer who took a lot of active listening to get into. (That's usually a good thing BTW.) I was intrigued by the sense that the music could go anywhere at any time, unlike the more form-based classical music I was familiar with.

The polyphony of it was also intriguing. One key to understanding was a quotation from him to the effect that he  was not interested in the more regimented sounds that older composers used (such as soldiers marching), but was trying to evoke the teeming, constantly shifting nature of modern urban life.

In addition, the more I listened, the more it was clear that he was exploiting something that older composers had also used, but in a more formal way: the notion that instruments have their own personalities and could interact like characters in a play. You can find this hinted at all the time in older music, but Carter put it much more in the center of his work.

Sure, you can't really whistle his compositions. But you can't whistle a play or a movie either. You have to approach the work on its own terms.

formerly VELIMIR (before that, Spitvalve)

"Who knows not strict counterpoint, lives and dies an ignoramus" - CPE Bach

Offline Wendell_E

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Re: The Carter Corner
« Reply #1482 on: July 09, 2017, 06:07:19 AM »
To be released on Aug. 11:



1 Interventions (2007) for piano and orchestra*†
2 Dialogues (2003) for piano and chamber orchestra*‡
3 Dialogues II (2010) for piano and chamber orchestra*‡
4 Soundings (2005) for orchestra*†
5–7 Two Controversies and a Conversation (2011) for piano, percussion and chamber orchestra*-‡
8 Instances (2012) for chamber orchestra†
9–20 Epigrams (2012) for piano trio* **

Pierre-Laurent Aimard, piano*
Isabelle Faust, violin **
Jean-Guihen Queyras, cello **
Colin Currie, percussion -

Birmingham Contemporary Music Group ‡
BBC Symphony Orchestra †
Oliver Knussen, conductor
“Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

Online blablawsky

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Re: The Carter Corner
« Reply #1483 on: December 27, 2017, 01:27:42 AM »
I'd like to hear some opinions and insights on the 1991 Juilliard Quartet recording of Carter's string quartets. For quite a while I found this recording to be less appealing than the 1974 release of quartets 2 and 3. Tonight, however, I found the 3rd quartet in the 1991 release to be one of the most appealing performances.

It seems to me that, in this recording, the instruments are most thoroughly integrated, while still retaining the spatial separation necessary for the work. Whereas other studio recordings of the 3rd quartet that I have heard (everything except for those by JACK Quartet and Composers Quartet) show the pieces and scaffolding that make up the players' understanding of its composition, the Juilliard Quartet seems to approach the work as a cohesive whole. Neither approach is necessarily better than the other, but I enjoyed the 1991 recording of the 3rd quartet because of its cohesive nature. Perhaps this difference in approaches contributed to my initial impression that the 1991 release was technically less secure than the 1974 release. I know that there are others who have this impression as well, and if you do, I encourage you to give this release another listen.

Offline snyprrr

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Re: The Carter Corner
« Reply #1484 on: December 27, 2017, 06:46:21 AM »
I'd like to hear some opinions and insights on the 1991 Juilliard Quartet recording of Carter's string quartets. For quite a while I found this recording to be less appealing than the 1974 release of quartets 2 and 3. Tonight, however, I found the 3rd quartet in the 1991 release to be one of the most appealing performances.

It seems to me that, in this recording, the instruments are most thoroughly integrated, while still retaining the spatial separation necessary for the work. Whereas other studio recordings of the 3rd quartet that I have estrd (everything except for those by JACK Quartet and Composers Quartet) show the pieces and scaffolding that make up the players' understanding of its composition, the Juilliard Quartet seems to approach the work as a cohesive whole. Neither approach is necessarily better than the other, but I enjoyed the 1991 recording of the 3rd quartet because of its cohesive nature. Perhaps this difference in approaches contributed to my initial impression that the 1991 release was technically less secure than the 1974 release. I know that there are others who have this impression as well, and if you do, I encourage you to give this release another listen.

ComposersQuartet for 1-2 (Nonesuch), and, yes, 1991 Julliard for, at least, No.3. Are you saying the JSQ also did an LP of 2-3 in 1974? (oh yes, on Testament??). I haven't checked the Arditti or the Pacifica...  I have Arditti on No.5...
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Online blablawsky

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Re: The Carter Corner
« Reply #1485 on: December 27, 2017, 07:42:41 AM »
ComposersQuartet for 1-2 (Nonesuch), and, yes, 1991 Julliard for, at least, No.3. Are you saying the JSQ also did an LP of 2-3 in 1974? (oh yes, on Testament??). I haven't checked the Arditti or the Pacifica...  I have Arditti on No.5...
There are two different JSQ recordings of the third quartet. One was released in 1974 and the other one was released in 1991. The Testament CD you are thinking of is the JSQ's first recording of the second quartet that was released alongside Berg and Schuman. This recording of the second quartet was made before the one released in 1974.

Online North Star

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Re: The Carter Corner
« Reply #1486 on: December 27, 2017, 09:52:05 AM »
ComposersQuartet for 1-2 (Nonesuch), and, yes, 1991 Julliard for, at least, No.3. Are you saying the JSQ also did an LP of 2-3 in 1974? (oh yes, on Testament??). I haven't checked the Arditti or the Pacifica...  I have Arditti on No.5...
You need to hear the Pacifica if you like the music (and even if you don't, really).
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Offline Archaic Torso of Apollo

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Re: The Carter Corner
« Reply #1487 on: December 28, 2017, 12:08:43 PM »
You need to hear the Pacifica if you like the music (and even if you don't, really).

Seconded!

BTW here's my Carter 4tet preference matrix, as of now:

1
3, 4, 5
2

For whatever reason, I have never quite gotten into #2, even though it seems to be a critical favorite.
formerly VELIMIR (before that, Spitvalve)

"Who knows not strict counterpoint, lives and dies an ignoramus" - CPE Bach

Offline bwv 1080

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Re: The Carter Corner
« Reply #1488 on: December 29, 2017, 05:38:16 PM »
To be released on Aug. 11:



1 Interventions (2007) for piano and orchestra*†
2 Dialogues (2003) for piano and chamber orchestra*‡
3 Dialogues II (2010) for piano and chamber orchestra*‡
4 Soundings (2005) for orchestra*†
5–7 Two Controversies and a Conversation (2011) for piano, percussion and chamber orchestra*-‡
8 Instances (2012) for chamber orchestra†
9–20 Epigrams (2012) for piano trio* **

Pierre-Laurent Aimard, piano*
Isabelle Faust, violin **
Jean-Guihen Queyras, cello **
Colin Currie, percussion -

Birmingham Contemporary Music Group ‡
BBC Symphony Orchestra †
Oliver Knussen, conductor

Cool, anyone heard this recording compared to Knussen’s Bridge recording with Nicholas Hodges?
Cogito cogito ergo cogito sum

Offline Jeffrey Smith

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Re: The Carter Corner
« Reply #1489 on: December 29, 2017, 06:23:51 PM »
Cool, anyone heard this recording compared to Knussen’s Bridge recording with Nicholas Hodges?

I never heard the Bridge, but I have the Ondine. It's good enough, and has enough premiere recordings, that you should get it no matter how it compares to the other.

BTW, I add my voice to those that like the Pacifica Quartet CDs.

Offline Brewski

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Re: The Carter Corner
« Reply #1490 on: December 30, 2017, 04:53:25 AM »
You need to hear the Pacifica if you like the music (and even if you don't, really).

Joining the chorus of praise for the Pacifica Quartet. And that "Late Works" recording looks mighty tasty...

--Bruce
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Offline San Antone

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Re: The Carter Corner
« Reply #1491 on: December 30, 2017, 03:40:34 PM »
Joining the chorus of praise for the Pacifica Quartet. And that "Late Works" recording looks mighty tasty...

--Bruce

+1 Pacifica, but also the Arditti for the SQ.  That late works recording is really good (and as noted already contains some previously unavailable works), I've enjoyed it very much.

Offline arpeggio

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Re: The Carter Corner
« Reply #1492 on: December 31, 2017, 11:49:40 AM »
Joining the chorus of praise for the Pacifica Quartet. And that "Late Works" recording looks mighty tasty...

--Bruce

I got the recording and it tastes great.

Online blablawsky

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Re: The Carter Corner
« Reply #1493 on: January 11, 2018, 09:46:01 AM »
The New York premier of the 4th quartet by The Composers Quartet is on symphonyshare. I think it's wonderful. If you want it and can't get to it then let me know and I'll let you have the files.

I don't think the 4th quartet is so nasty - to use snyprr's word. In the end all the voices are singing the same song! I can see the connection between the quartet and Night Fantasies. For Night Fantasies I like Rosen very much.

Anyway the 4th quartet is no more nasty than Gotterdammerung. Or Beckett's Happy Days.
Hi Mandryka, do you still have the premier of the 4th quartet? And possibly a transfer of the Composers' SQ version of the third quartet? The links on symphonyshare are not working anymore.

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