Author Topic: Debussy's Preludes  (Read 27765 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Turner

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1210
  • Location: Europe
Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #100 on: March 05, 2017, 08:51:14 AM »
Daniel Ericourt was mentioned briefly, but the often fine/interesting, complete cycles of for example Fou Tsong (modern sound), Marcelle Meyer & Livia Rev weren´t.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2017, 08:52:59 AM by Turner »

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8410
Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #101 on: March 06, 2017, 09:58:10 AM »
Daniel Ericourt was mentioned briefly, but the often fine/interesting, complete cycles of for example Fou Tsong (modern sound), Marcelle Meyer & Livia Rev weren´t.

How interventionist is Ericourt? Someone said to me that the he really does fiddle around with the score, but I can't check for myself.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Turner

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1210
  • Location: Europe
Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #102 on: March 07, 2017, 12:24:01 AM »
How interventionist is Ericourt? Someone said to me that the he really does fiddle around with the score, but I can't check for myself.

Ericourt:
- "Perhaps the easiest way to describe Ericourt’s superb, insightful pianism is that he synthesizes the best qualities of his generation’s two premier Debussy players, fusing Walter Gieseking’s tonal refinement with Robert Casadesus’ highly articulated fingerwork. More often than not, Ericourt’s rhythmic exactitude, wide dynamic range, and textural differentiation give clarity and shape to passages other pianists habitually blur (such as ostinatos, trills, and arpeggios"
http://www.classicstoday.com/review/review-10358/

- Another reviewer underlining clarity: http://www.organissimo.org/forum/index.php?/topic/31334-daniel-ericourts-complete-debussy-piano-works/

- http://cvnc.org/article.cfm?articleId=4146

- http://www.greensboro.com/funeral-held-today-for-famed-concert-pianist-pianist-daniel-ericourt/article_6300ce7d-5ffe-51c1-9bdd-74ef6f5430ea.html

So technically he is good. My impression is that he can be interventionist, obvious from listening to some rather free-style playing in "Minstrels", "La Serenade Interrompue" or his very light and dance-like "La Danse de Puck". But it also seems organized to me. In "Ce que a vu le Vent d´Ouest"  he is coherent and structured, then there´s a bit of extra wilderness almost at the end, to underline effects, for example. As regards his accents in individual notes, I´m not able to judge it.

Certainly original and interesting recordings. I´ve got the old Kapp LPs. CDs seem very expensive right now.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2017, 12:34:40 AM by Turner »

Offline aukhawk

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 569
  • Frankie
  • Location: England
  • Currently Listening to:
    Bach to Björk
Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #103 on: March 07, 2017, 09:05:38 AM »


HIP Debussy Preludes.  Hiroko Sasaki uses an 1873 Pleyel for her recording, and the results are partly ear-opening.  Here is hammerless Debussy in most of its glory.  The sound is not like a Steinway.  The piano has excellent dynamics - though it can't match a Steinway D - and it lacks the brilliant, bright colors of a modern piano, but the color palette is most attractive, and it is a perfect fit for Debussy's music. ...

I was interested by Todd's description of this piano sound, and so acquired this recording a couple of days ago.  It is gorgeous.  Whereas any attempt to fit the sound of a modern concert grand into my humble living room would inevitably be doomed to failure, this just seems to fit right in, it's just so ... believable.

I'm no expert on performances, but this certainly makes the other two recordings I have (Martino Tirimo, Gordon Fergus-Thompson) completely redundant, they just sound prosaic in comparison.
Thanks, Todd, for your inviting overview of this release.

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5813
  • Posts: who's counting?
  • Currently Listening to:
    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #104 on: March 09, 2017, 08:07:30 PM »
My latest acquisition is the Egorov box set and his Preludes, spread over two CDs, also sound very good to me and very close to Richter for top choice.

Egorov is awesome, with perhaps the softest touch of any pianist I've heard in the Preludes. But this soft touch isn't borne from a lightweight. On the contrary, he's happy brooding his way through each piece and carving out phrases.

In the end, though, I'm most fond of Kocsis. He's his usual exploratory self, with faster pacing in some pieces than is perhaps the norm, but not a single bar sounds rushed. He's great at manipulating a phrase, or whole sections, to flesh out the contrasts while keeping a solid grip on the whole. The end result is some mighty fine fantasy.


« Last Edit: March 18, 2017, 12:35:02 PM by Dancing Divertimentian »
Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5813
  • Posts: who's counting?
  • Currently Listening to:
    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #105 on: March 13, 2017, 03:49:48 PM »
Daniel Ericourt was mentioned briefly, but the often fine/interesting, complete cycles of for example Fou Tsong (modern sound), Marcelle Meyer & Livia Rev weren´t.

Livia Rev is definitely a dark-horse, but I agree she's great. But which recording are you referring to? She recorded a complete cycle for Saga in the early '80s and a partial cycle for Hyperion in the early '90s. I have the Saga set as well as her book 2 preludes on Hyperion.

She's a tad more animated for Saga but not as well recorded. The better sound on Hyperion allows for more nuance and greater depth, but overall I'd say neither has a leg up on the other. I think I slightly prefer the Hyperion, just for the sound.

One thing's for certain, though: she's the absolute anthesis of Beroff, Kocsis, and their ilk. Abandon isn't in her genes. Not that she's staid or reticent or anything, just that she's all about making every block of sound stand out. Obviously she knows how to make it work, though, so I give her plenty of kudos.
Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5813
  • Posts: who's counting?
  • Currently Listening to:
    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #106 on: March 13, 2017, 04:03:03 PM »
Where I think he really is outstanding is in Book 2 -- he makes Book 2 sound as great as Book 1.

Interesting view. For me Book 2 is the preferred book, reaching farther into the future than the Book 1. But they're both great, of course!
Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline Turner

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1210
  • Location: Europe
Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #107 on: March 13, 2017, 10:47:15 PM »
Livia Rev is definitely a dark-horse, but I agree she's great. But which recording are you referring to? She recorded a complete cycle for Saga in the early '80s and a partial cycle for Hyperion in the early '90s. I have the Saga set as well as her book 2 preludes on Hyperion.

She's a tad more animated for Saga but not as well recorded. The better sound on Hyperion allows for more nuance and greater depth, but overall I'd say neither has a leg up on the other. I think I slightly prefer the Hyperion, just for the sound.

One thing's for certain, though: she's the absolute anthesis of Beroff, Kocsis, and their ilk. Abandon isn't in her genes. Not that she's staid or reticent or anything, just that she's all about making every block of sound stand out. Obviously she knows how to make it work, though, so I give her plenty of kudos.

I have the Saga sets, some more Debussy as well with her.

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 14277
Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #108 on: March 18, 2017, 07:43:41 AM »



Another Frenchman joins the fray in Debussy's Preludes.  A student of Gaby Casadesus and Vitaly Margulis, Philippe Bianconi's tutelage was first rate.  His playing is, too.  He plays the entire set at a somewhat brisk seventy-four-ish minutes, and yet he never sounds rushed, and on more than one occasion he imparts a nice, languid sensibility without ever overdoing it.  Everything sounds natural, for lack of a better word, and no individual piece really stands out.  (Okay, The Engulfed Cathedral could have been a bit grander in scale.)  And both books sound roughly equal, whereas a fair number of pianists seem to be better in one or the other.  The second book has more of a cool feel than a more modernist feel, which is to the good here. 

Sound is close, a bit dry, and mostly about midrange, without a lot of lower register heft or upper register sparkle, but it is still superb.

La Dolce Vita's hit rate remains very high.
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5813
  • Posts: who's counting?
  • Currently Listening to:
    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #109 on: March 18, 2017, 09:50:06 AM »


I have that Preludes disc en route to me as I type. Looking forward to hearing it.

Interesting observation about the sonics. YouTube has several movements from this disc available for listening and I think I've noticed what you describe (I'll know more when I actually hear the disc). Although I have a feeling there could be some bias on my part since the sonics on Bianconi's DSD Lyrinx recordings are some of the finest in the catalogue.

If you ever come across Bianconi's disc with Images cheaply it might be worth your while.





 
Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 14277
Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #110 on: March 18, 2017, 11:06:32 AM »
...Although I have a feeling there could be some bias on my part since the sonics on Bianconi's DSD Lyrinx recordings are some of the finest in the catalogue.


The few Lyrinx recordings I own are all SOTA sound.  Too bad the distribution for the label doesn't seem especially robust.
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5813
  • Posts: who's counting?
  • Currently Listening to:
    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: Debussy's Preludes
« Reply #111 on: March 18, 2017, 12:07:41 PM »
Too bad the distribution for the label doesn't seem especially robust.

Yes, +1. It's a label I'd like to know better. For us Stateside though it's a crapshoot.
Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Buying Music From Amazon?
Please consider using these links. A small percentage of every sale using these links is passed on to GMG and helps keep this forum online.
Amazon US
Amazon Canada
Amazon UK