Author Topic: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)  (Read 17157 times)

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scarpia

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #20 on: October 24, 2008, 08:30:05 AM »
If Stringer, Ossonce and Sanderling had not come along I am sure that I would be happy with Plasson but they did and I have come to prefer them.

I generally agree regarding Plasson, it was the first I heard and was good enough to convince me that Magnard is interesting.  However I have come to prefer Sanderling (partly because of the unpleasant early digital EMI sound).  However I don't find Ossonce convincing.

karlhenning

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Re: Alberic Magnard (1865-1914)
« Reply #21 on: October 31, 2008, 07:37:10 AM »
Another composer whose work I need to get to know . . . .

Offline Dundonnell

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Re: Alberic Magnard (1865-1914)
« Reply #22 on: October 31, 2008, 07:41:04 AM »
Another composer whose work I need to get to know . . . .

Certainly is :) Exploration broadens the mind as well as the horizons ;D

Offline J.Z. Herrenberg

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Re: Alberic Magnard (1865-1914)
« Reply #23 on: October 31, 2008, 07:45:15 AM »
Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything. -- Plato

Offline monafam

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #24 on: July 29, 2009, 04:57:26 AM »
I just wanted to say that I've realy enjoyed Magnard's symphonies as well.   I initially got it because of the eClassical deal; however, I was somewhat reluctant to move them to the tops of my playlist because of some opinions on another site.  While not damning, it certainly wasn't quite as praiseworthy as this particular thread.   I'm glad I gave him a shot -- I really enjoy his works.

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #25 on: July 29, 2009, 05:05:19 AM »
I just wanted to say that I've realy enjoyed Magnard's symphonies as well.   I initially got it because of the eClassical deal; however, I was somewhat reluctant to move them to the tops of my playlist because of some opinions on another site.  While not damning, it certainly wasn't quite as praiseworthy as this particular thread.   I'm glad I gave him a shot -- I really enjoy his works.

Which proves the point: no opinion is more important than your own. Glad you like the symphonies. Which versions do you own? I'm a Sanderling man, but enjoy Ossonce too; very different interpretations.

Sarge
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Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
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Offline J.Z. Herrenberg

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #26 on: July 29, 2009, 09:18:25 AM »
Which proves the point: no opinion is more important than your own. Glad you like the symphonies. Which versions do you own? I'm a Sanderling man, but enjoy Ossonce too; very different interpretations.

Yes, I think you need both series. Sanderling and Ossonce both understand Magnard's music very well, but they stress different aspects. To be very simplistic about it: Ossonce accentuates the drama and the colour, Sanderling the seriousness and the construction. Perhaps it's France vs. Germany...

I have one very unmusical confession to make - whenever I listen to Magnard's Fourth I choose Sanderling for the first three movements but Ossonce for the hair-raising finale. Ossonce really brings out the desperation and heroism of that movement. With him it becomes an emotional rollercoaster that only just ends in (heavily) qualified triumph. Very moving.
Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything. -- Plato

Offline monafam

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #27 on: July 29, 2009, 10:43:44 AM »
I happened to purchase the Sanderling versions. 

While I know the conductor/performer makes an impact, I've never really considered the impact the different interpretations should make.  If I purchase this other set, it sounds like I will have an excellent case study!

Thanks!

snyprrr

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #28 on: July 31, 2009, 02:31:13 PM »
I just heard a snippet of Magnard's sole SQ (e minor, 1906?). Wow, it seems to have "the" sound. I have heard that Magnard's and Schoenberg's Op.7 are the two SQs that most fully answer late Beethoven.

There are a few recordings: Artis?, Via Nova, Ysaye, Hyperion?. The Ysaye had so-so reviews, the Artis (on Adda) is ridiculously expensive, and the Via Nova awaits review. I'm not sure about the Hyperion (or, if there is one).

But, judging from the little I head, Magnard's SQ could be a long lost epic masterpiece.

Anyone?

DFO

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #29 on: July 31, 2009, 03:20:47 PM »
Have the Via Nova. Excelent IMHO.Also have all Dvorak, and Schubert, and...nearly 300 more. I LOVE SQ!! ;D

DavidW

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #30 on: July 31, 2009, 03:35:42 PM »
I just heard a snippet of Magnard's sole SQ (e minor, 1906?). Wow, it seems to have "the" sound. I have heard that Magnard's and Schoenberg's Op.7 are the two SQs that most fully answer late Beethoven.

There are a few recordings: Artis?, Via Nova, Ysaye, Hyperion?. The Ysaye had so-so reviews, the Artis (on Adda) is ridiculously expensive, and the Via Nova awaits review. I'm not sure about the Hyperion (or, if there is one).

But, judging from the little I head, Magnard's SQ could be a long lost epic masterpiece.

Anyone?

Yes it is good!  This is surprising! :D  Anyway check out

and you will also get Faure's sublime string quartet. 0:)

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #31 on: August 01, 2009, 12:39:32 PM »
Yes it is good!  This is surprising! :D  Anyway check out

and you will also get Faure's sublime string quartet. 0:)

I second David's recommendation.

Sarge
« Last Edit: January 27, 2010, 04:51:53 PM by Sergeant Rock »
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

snyprrr

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #32 on: January 27, 2010, 03:45:36 PM »
I just got the Quatuor Ysaye recording of the SQ, with the Faure.

Wow, I have listened for a few days now, and I think this Magnard is shooting right up to the top of my "most-attractive-to-listen-to" list. The is plenty of drama, but there is a certain "consonance" to all the hard parts, so that the entire thing is sooo easy to listen to, even though it is as deep and thought provoking as late LvB (perhaps the Eb comes to mind the most).

All I can say is that this SQ sounds to me like nothing else. All of the Romantic red flags that I don't like,... aren't there. Maybe it's the way he develops, but I am riveted to every note, as if I can hear Magnard writing the piece.

The first mvmt just keeps on going and going,... it reminds me of some kind of the noblest King Arthur/ forest music. It's very hard for me to describe, but I feel like I'm listening to an organic Klimpt(?) painting.

The scherzo sounds so familiar that I'm wondering who Magnard stole the theme from? This is some of the most immediately appealing serious classical music I've ever heard.

The slow mvmt (Chant Funebre) has a very rarified atmosphere. It is neither sad, nor gloomy,... but has such a noble sentiment that I can't really say,... it's just really a unique sound Magnard has going in theis SQ.

Sorry, I'm just sold.

I think it was the MusicWeb review that said that this recording wasn't as,...incisive?... as the Artis on the old Accord cd; but, this recording is so special (the notes even go on about the sound of the Abbey where this was recorded) that I really could care less right now. The recording is so sumptuous one really feels like one is sitting in a very special place.

I know this review sounds a bit aon the fairy side, but this score is really a nice big steak dinner. Enjoy!

And, the Faure, with the same sublime sound, makes a perfect discmate to this jewel.

DavidW

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #33 on: January 27, 2010, 05:02:21 PM »
Cool beans. :)

Offline J.Z. Herrenberg

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #34 on: January 31, 2010, 06:20:42 AM »
Thanks, snyprrr, for that wonderful endorsement. I now know for certain my Magnard collection isn't complete!
Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything. -- Plato

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #35 on: January 31, 2010, 06:50:08 AM »
Thanks, snyprrr, for that wonderful endorsement. I now know for certain my Magnard collection isn't complete!

Me too - I love Magnard's Symphony 4 and Chant Funebre - so this sounds like a must.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #36 on: March 26, 2011, 06:24:42 PM »
Magnard's Symphony No. 4 is a masterpiece as far as I'm concerned, though the third was wonderful as well. I wished he composed much more. I own both the Sanderling and Ossonce recordings (I have not heard Plasson's set though I generally dislike his conducting). I like the energy of the Sanderling, but the natural flow that Ossonce produces is much more alluring to me. Ossoance also knows how to build those climaxes, but his handling of the more lyrical sections is truly exemplary.
"Music should be able to invoke the natural emotions in all human beings. Music is not notes fixed on apiece of paper.” - Toru Takemitsu

Online Daverz

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #37 on: March 26, 2011, 07:09:13 PM »
Must have Magnard



Unfortunately as an appendage to a bunch of Liszt on a 2-CD set, but whaddaya gonna do.  I have not heard the Ossonce set,  but this Ansermet recording easily bests Sanderling or Plasson both for performance and recording quality.  There's also a mono broadcast of a live Ansermet performance of the Magnard on Cascavelle that has been getting praise in the mags.

Offline The new erato

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #38 on: March 27, 2011, 01:42:35 AM »
Must have Magnard



Unfortunately as an appendage to a bunch of Liszt on a 2-CD set, but whaddaya gonna do.  I have not heard the Ossonce set,  but this Ansermet recording easily bests Sanderling or Plasson both for performance and recording quality.  There's also a mono broadcast of a live Ansermet performance of the Magnard on Cascavelle that has been getting praise in the mags.
A not very obvious coupling I agree, and one that will prevent me from buying this disc. A single disc with the Magnard coupled with some similar (preferable reasonably obscure) french music from the same period would have made it a must-buy for me. I suddenly see there are some advantages to downloads.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Alberic Magnard(1865-1914)
« Reply #39 on: March 27, 2011, 08:09:24 AM »
A not very obvious coupling I agree, and one that will prevent me from buying this disc. A single disc with the Magnard coupled with some similar (preferable reasonably obscure) french music from the same period would have made it a must-buy for me. I suddenly see there are some advantages to downloads.

Yes, I wouldn't buy this 2-CD set either. The coupling just isn't logical at all. I own the Sanderling and Ossonce cycles, so I'm pretty set as far as the symphonies go.
"Music should be able to invoke the natural emotions in all human beings. Music is not notes fixed on apiece of paper.” - Toru Takemitsu