Author Topic: Ravel's Rotunda  (Read 34324 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: Stravinsky Has Ruined Ravel for Me
« Reply #240 on: June 21, 2017, 06:23:44 AM »
Yeah, well I will ruin Ravel for you if you don't ***** *****  because you'll ***** ***** back to the Xenakis thread this instant!

I'm counting to ten and if you don't move  >:(

1.........

2........

'MURICA, WOOOO!!!! Pass me over the table some biscuits!! :D ;D


Offline Robert101

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 20
  • Location: Ottawa
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #241 on: June 21, 2017, 07:15:59 AM »
i  just recently discovered the Piano Concerto for Left Hand. What a mind-blowingly work, pitting the left hand of the piano against a very large orchestra. I swear if you don't know the work and just listen to it you will never know it is for the left hand alone. The contrabasson solo at the beginning sounds like it is from some primordial bowel of the earth and not from a musical instrument.

Anyway I rather like this performance here. Miss Wang's steely left fingers displaying some pyrotechnics !

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbEtk1kdYx4

My favorite however is this classic:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Sxpi0zybzA

(And how is it that Ravel only has 12 pages in this thread?)


I agree. It's Ravel at his most direct, urgent self. Yet his bittersweet harmonies and orchestrational brilliance still shine through. I'll take the first 5 minutes of that work over almost anything.

snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: Stravinsky Has Ruined Ravel for Me
« Reply #242 on: July 03, 2017, 07:28:44 AM »
This Alien is contemplating a mass invasion of Snyprrr land. Our race will take all your Stravinsky CDs off you and deport you back to HOME  ;)

"Signal rhythms coming from Andromeda Prime, Captain. Hailing frequencies open..."


"aww, shizzle"


"Captain, we're being forced to listen to 'Maggot Brain' via the Mothership Connection. Permission to load lactating HiggsBosom cannon!"

Offline North Star

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17076
  • Location: Oulu, Finland
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #243 on: August 11, 2017, 01:17:50 AM »
I concur, he's my favorite post-baroque composer at the moment for some reason.
You have truly seen the light!
"Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it." - Confucius

My photographs on Flickr

snyprrr

  • Guest
Serious Question About Ravel's Violin Sonata: Blues
« Reply #244 on: November 29, 2017, 09:01:48 PM »
I really have some stylistic issues with Ravel's... Masterpiece. On one hand, it's as refined and cosmopolitan and...hip as anything from the last forty years, but I also feel that Ravel is trying to hard, or maybe the technology wasn't in place yet for better notation, or...

or maybe it's genius.

SO, HERE'S MY QUESTION: In the 'Blues' middle movement, there is a section where the violin plays these jaunty chords, and the piano just doesn't seem to be in the same... tempo,... or,... but,... I've listened to a couple of reliable sources, and I guess it's in the score, though I can't read it very well.

What's going on here? It's sounds terrible to me...

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 44277
  • Bohuslav Martinů (1890 - 1959)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    The Opening of the Wells on Magic Nights
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #245 on: February 11, 2018, 08:18:12 AM »
Quite a wonderful mini-documentary:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/oFxySK-GePM" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/oFxySK-GePM</a>
“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline Maestro267

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1387
  • Location: Wales
Re: Serious Question About Ravel's Violin Sonata: Blues
« Reply #246 on: February 11, 2018, 08:21:51 AM »
I really have some stylistic issues with Ravel's... Masterpiece. On one hand, it's as refined and cosmopolitan and...hip as anything from the last forty years, but I also feel that Ravel is trying to hard, or maybe the technology wasn't in place yet for better notation, or...

or maybe it's genius.

SO, HERE'S MY QUESTION: In the 'Blues' middle movement, there is a section where the violin plays these jaunty chords, and the piano just doesn't seem to be in the same... tempo,... or,... but,... I've listened to a couple of reliable sources, and I guess it's in the score, though I can't read it very well.

What's going on here? It's sounds terrible to me...

I didn't know Daphnis et Chloé had a "Blues" middle movement...and I'm sure it doesn't call for a piano.

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 44277
  • Bohuslav Martinů (1890 - 1959)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    The Opening of the Wells on Magic Nights
Re: Serious Question About Ravel's Violin Sonata: Blues
« Reply #247 on: February 11, 2018, 08:53:17 AM »
I really have some stylistic issues with Ravel's... Masterpiece. On one hand, it's as refined and cosmopolitan and...hip as anything from the last forty years, but I also feel that Ravel is trying to hard, or maybe the technology wasn't in place yet for better notation, or...

or maybe it's genius.

SO, HERE'S MY QUESTION: In the 'Blues' middle movement, there is a section where the violin plays these jaunty chords, and the piano just doesn't seem to be in the same... tempo,... or,... but,... I've listened to a couple of reliable sources, and I guess it's in the score, though I can't read it very well.

What's going on here? It's sounds terrible to me...

Well, the Violin Sonata isn’t Ravel’s only masterpiece. To make the assertion that it is doesn’t seem like a fair judgment on your part. What about works like the String Quartet, Miroirs, Gaspard de la nuit, the Piano Trio, Le tombeau de Couperin, Jeux d’eau, L'enfant et les sortilèges, Chansons madécasses, the piano concerti, Daphnis et Chloé, or Shéhérazade? These works certainly more than hold up to the idea of a ‘masterpiece’.

Oh and there’s nothing wrong with the Violin Sonata or the way it was constructed. That’s just your ears failing to make a connection.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 08:55:30 AM by Mirror Image »
“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 44277
  • Bohuslav Martinů (1890 - 1959)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    The Opening of the Wells on Magic Nights
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #248 on: February 12, 2018, 02:20:29 PM »
Quite a wonderful mini-documentary:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/oFxySK-GePM" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/oFxySK-GePM</a>

Has anyone seen this? It’s great!
« Last Edit: February 12, 2018, 02:26:21 PM by Mirror Image »
“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 44277
  • Bohuslav Martinů (1890 - 1959)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    The Opening of the Wells on Magic Nights
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #249 on: March 06, 2018, 09:28:05 PM »
Happy Birthday, Monsieur Ravel!

[Ravel playing his piano arrangement of ‘Happy Birthday’ with ravishing harmonies.]
« Last Edit: March 06, 2018, 09:31:57 PM by Mirror Image »
“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline Draško

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 556
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #250 on: March 28, 2018, 05:00:42 AM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/RHZPg7PnNRQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/RHZPg7PnNRQ</a>

A video of Samson François talking about Ravel's music and playing Toccata from Le Tombeau de Couperin.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 50733
  • Et quid amabo nisi quod ænigma est?
    • Henningmusick
  • Location: Boston, Mass.
  • Currently Listening to:
    Shostakovich, Frescobaldi, Stravinsky, JS Bach, Liszt, Chopin, Haydn, Henning
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #251 on: March 28, 2018, 05:12:29 AM »
I like him better and better:  he christened his lorry Adélaïde.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline milk

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2632
  • Location: usa
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #252 on: May 23, 2018, 03:08:19 PM »
I found this super depressing but also fascinating:
This week, we're throwing it back to an old favorite: a story about obsession, creativity, and a strange symmetry between a biologist and a composer that revolves around one famously repetitive piece of music.

Anne Adams was a brilliant biologist. But when her son Alex was in a bad car accident, she decided to stay home to help him recover. And then, rather suddenly, she decided to quit science altogether and become a full-time artist. After that, her husband Robert Adams tells us, she just painted and painted and painted. First houses and buildings, then a series of paintings involving strawberries, and then ... "Bolero."

At some point, Anne became obsessed with Maurice Ravel's famous composition and decided to put an elaborate visual rendition of the song to canvas. She called it "Unraveling Bolero." But at the time, she had no idea that both she and Ravel would themselves unravel shortly after their experiences with this odd piece of music. Arbie Orenstein tells us what happened to Ravel after he wrote "Bolero," and neurologist Bruce Miller helps us understand how, for both Anne and Ravel, "Bolero" might have been the first symptom of a deadly disease.

https://player.fm/series/radiolab-from-wnyc/unraveling-bolero

Baron Scarpia

  • Guest
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #253 on: May 23, 2018, 03:27:06 PM »
I heard the same podcast this week. The comparison with the biologist is new, but speculations about the Bolero and dementia have surfaced before.

https://www.nature.com/news/2002/020122/full/news020121-1.html

One thing that seems to contradict the idea is the fact that the Piano Concerto for the left hand was written years after Bolero and isn't at all repetitive.


Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 44277
  • Bohuslav Martinů (1890 - 1959)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    The Opening of the Wells on Magic Nights
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #254 on: May 23, 2018, 06:12:28 PM »
The story about Ravel suffering from dementia while writing Boléro is BS and, quite frankly, unfounded. The composer even joked about Boléro before saying "I've written only one masterpiece—Boléro. Unfortunately, there’s no music in it.” :P This doesn’t seem like someone who suffers from dementia to me. He knew exactly what he was doing.
“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline milk

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2632
  • Location: usa
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #255 on: May 23, 2018, 06:23:35 PM »
The story about Ravel suffering from dementia while writing Boléro is BS and, quite frankly, unfounded. The composer even joked about Boléro before saying "I've written only one masterpiece—Boléro. Unfortunately, there’s no music in it.” :P This doesn’t seem like someone who suffers from dementia to me. He knew exactly what he was doing.

This podcast claims that when Bolero premiered, someone in the audience yelled, “he’s crazy!” True or not, I burst out laughing from that. That’s pretty funny.

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 44277
  • Bohuslav Martinů (1890 - 1959)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    The Opening of the Wells on Magic Nights
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #256 on: May 23, 2018, 07:00:38 PM »

This podcast claims that when Bolero premiered, someone in the audience yelled, “he’s crazy!” True or not, I burst out laughing from that. That’s pretty funny.

I’m sure it delighted the composer. :)
“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline milk

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2632
  • Location: usa
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #257 on: May 23, 2018, 07:47:10 PM »
I’m sure it delighted the composer. :)
Probably no one laughed at the time. Sound like a Seinfeld episode now.

Baron Scarpia

  • Guest
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #258 on: May 23, 2018, 08:50:47 PM »
The story about Ravel suffering from dementia while writing Boléro is BS and, quite frankly, unfounded. The composer even joked about Boléro before saying "I've written only one masterpiece—Boléro. Unfortunately, there’s no music in it.” :P This doesn’t seem like someone who suffers from dementia to me. He knew exactly what he was doing.

Early signs of dementia were noted as early as 1927, including aphasia, memory lapses (losing his place when performing familiar music), deterioration of writing. Even years later, when he was almost entirely disabled, he was said to have maintained his personality and self-awareness. No one could (or would) say that the Bolero was a symptom of dementia, but the idea that a neurological disorder could influence him to go in a different artistic direction is not without support. One symptom of frontotemporal dementia is that sufferers tend to be drawn to repetition.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2018, 09:11:04 PM by Baron Scarpia »

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 44277
  • Bohuslav Martinů (1890 - 1959)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    The Opening of the Wells on Magic Nights
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #259 on: May 24, 2018, 04:47:37 AM »
Early signs of dementia were noted as early as 1927, including aphasia, memory lapses (losing his place when performing familiar music), deterioration of writing. Even years later, when he was almost entirely disabled, he was said to have maintained his personality and self-awareness. No one could (or would) say that the Bolero was a symptom of dementia, but the idea that a neurological disorder could influence him to go in a different artistic direction is not without support. One symptom of frontotemporal dementia is that sufferers tend to be drawn to repetition.

I don’t doubt that Ravel suffered from a neurological disorder, but I doubt this had any effect on Ravel's writing of Boléro as he wrote both piano concerti after Boléro. That’s what I was doubting. Also, after writing Boléro, there was the song cycle Don Quichotte à Dulcinée, which, again, shows no signs of someone suffering from a neurological disorder even though he very much was at this point (1933).
« Last Edit: May 24, 2018, 04:55:14 AM by Mirror Image »
“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

 

Don't Like These Ads? Become a GMG Subscriber!
For as little as 14 cents per day, subscribers get no advertising on the forum, a larger Inbox for your PM's, and a warm glow of knowing you are supporting the forum. All this and a groovy Subscriber badge too!
Click here to read more.