Author Topic: Ravel's Rotunda  (Read 26353 times)

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Kullervo

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #40 on: October 23, 2008, 07:11:40 AM »
I think it's pretty good;  that is the recording of the Sonata for Vn & Vc and the Piano Trio that I have loaded onto my Sansa Fuze . . . .

I've just noticed you reviewed this very disc. :D

lukeottevanger

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #41 on: October 23, 2008, 07:14:20 AM »
I don't know it (unless some of the recordings are the same as on the disc I recommended above). But I'd hazard that it is. It looks like it includes the chamber-accompanied songs which are just a must-have. I might try it myself, actually, even though I think I must have everything on it a few times over! Ravel is worth it  :)

karlhenning

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #42 on: October 23, 2008, 07:14:57 AM »
Yes, some duplication in Ravel can't be bad!

lukeottevanger

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #43 on: October 23, 2008, 07:17:33 AM »
Indeed! And in fact, on the advice read above I've just ordered myself Maazel's Enfant, even though I'm perfectly happy with Ansermet.

Looking at the details, I think half of the Nash disc is made up of the same recordings as on the disc I already have. I adore the chamber-accompanied songs, but I have several sets already, so I'll pass on this for now whilst remaining interested!

greg

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #44 on: October 24, 2008, 03:39:54 PM »
I just turned on the TV and heard something awesome!
At first guess, I thought it was some mid-20th century French composer, like Poulenc or something. Then I though, "Maybe...... it could be Prokofiev. Maybe a ballet I've never heard before, like the Stone Flower." Then, about 10 seconds before it was over and revealed to me, i guessed Ravel's La Valse (i doubt i've even heard it before).  8)

Seriously, incredible music!  :o
They showed a ballet of tons of people ballroom dancing....... now, as much as I despise dancing, this was actually cool dancing to cool music. I mean, if it were played at a high school prom (in my dreams lol) I would've actually went and danced with someone! It's that good.

Drasko

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #45 on: November 20, 2008, 09:41:00 AM »


Pavane pour une infante defunte
Lucien Thévet, horn
Orchestre du Theatre des Champs-Elysees
Pedro de Freitas Branco
28.04.1953, Paris
[mp3=200,20,0,left]http://www.fileden.com/files/2008/7/24/2018019/Maurice%20Ravel%20-%20Pavane%20pour%20une%20infante%20defunte.mp3[/mp3]

I believe you can hear Thévet's glimmering horn vibrato also on Cluytens' Ravel recordings with l'Orchestre de la Société des Concerts du Conservatoire on French EMI (Rouge et Noir) but they sure don't make them like that anymore.

Drasko

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #46 on: November 20, 2008, 11:20:43 AM »
.......but they sure don't make them like that anymore.

...nor before, apparently...

Pavane pour une infante défunte
Orchestre Symphonique du Gramophon
Piero Coppola
1928-1932 (unfortunately don't know the name of principal horn)
[mp3=200,20,0,left]http://www.fileden.com/files/2008/7/24/2018019/W871-Coppola-RAVEL-Pavane.mp3[/mp3]

Transfer is by Mr.Reysen, posted on rmcr. Those interested in more of Piero Coppola's recordings from this period, including La Mer and Le Tombeau de Couperin, can download them from here.

mn dave

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #47 on: November 20, 2008, 11:30:28 AM »
Thanks, Drasko. If I remember, I'm going to check these out when I get home. That piece strikes me as unique and I enjoy it quite a bit.

karlhenning

  • Guest
Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #48 on: November 20, 2008, 11:36:56 AM »
I just turned on the TV and heard something awesome!
At first guess, I thought it was some mid-20th century French composer, like Poulenc or something. Then I though, "Maybe...... it could be Prokofiev. Maybe a ballet I've never heard before, like the Stone Flower." Then, about 10 seconds before it was over and revealed to me, i guessed Ravel's La Valse (i doubt i've even heard it before).  8)

Seriously, incredible music!  :o
They showed a ballet of tons of people ballroom dancing....... now, as much as I despise dancing, this was actually cool dancing to cool music. I mean, if it were played at a high school prom (in my dreams lol) I would've actually went and danced with someone! It's that good.

I love La valse.

Offline Herman

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #49 on: November 20, 2008, 12:30:33 PM »
I just turned on the TV and heard something awesome!
At first guess, I thought it was some mid-20th century French composer, like Poulenc or something. Then I though, "Maybe...... it could be Prokofiev. Maybe a ballet I've never heard before, like the Stone Flower." Then, about 10 seconds before it was over and revealed to me, i guessed Ravel's La Valse (i doubt i've even heard it before).  8)

Seriously, incredible music!  :o
They showed a ballet of tons of people ballroom dancing....... now, as much as I despise dancing, this was actually cool dancing to cool music. I mean, if it were played at a high school prom (in my dreams lol) I would've actually went and danced with someone! It's that good.

Probably you were looking at the Balanchine ballet.

Online The new erato

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #50 on: November 20, 2008, 10:16:29 PM »
I've enjoyed these two a lot recently (even though they are not all-Ravel discs):





(I find the Chopin sonata on this last disc to be quite unusual, don't yet know if I hate it or love it).

Lilas Pastia

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #51 on: November 28, 2008, 08:52:44 PM »
Drasko's comments are never designed to arouse interest (like mine ;D), but to inform and point to subtle artistic qualities. Which is why I appreciate the time he takes to direct our attention to some specific recordings. IOW, when he says Freitas Branco's Ravel is special, you better believe it. This is one of the most individual and downright unique orchestral recordings of anything I know. Nobody who thinks  he/she *knows* Alborada del gracioso, Pavane or Bolero will ever think the same after hearing those recordings. BRO has that EMI Rarissimes 2-disc set available for cheap right now.

For the money you get some rather unique Falla and Turina too.

Drasko

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #52 on: November 29, 2008, 10:03:34 AM »
 ;D ;)

The point I was possibly trying to make is that playing styles whose loss we sometimes lament (Russian, French, Czech) never were set in stone in the first place, and kept evolving and changing through generations of musicians. I believe we can hear that in those two recordings of Ravel's Pavane I posted. Unfortunate thing is that these days those styles seem to evolve into far too much uniformity across the globe.

As for Freitas Branco disc, yes I agree, the Ravel selection is essential, including above posted Pavane (my personal favorite) and that near mythical rendering of 18 and a half minute, rock steady tempo Bolero with more than piquant contributions from various soloists, Only thing keeping it from being true benchmark is somewhat limited dynamic range due to mono recording.
Turina selection sounds great to me, but I have nothing to compare it with, Falla's El Amor Brujo is a good one as well, though competition there is pretty fierce. Definitely recommendable disc.   


Lilas Pastia

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #53 on: November 29, 2008, 04:54:10 PM »
I guess orchestral playing undergoes evolution like many other living entities. Influential players/teachers are the driving force behind those evolutionary stages, and these stages take the form of a time 'plateau' during which an ensemble's sound acquires a distinct personality. In some rare cases orchestra  members (like the WP) see themselves as guardians of the tradition and make sure there is no evolution. 

In the case of the french orchestras, this personality is most apparent in the wind and brass playing. The Bolero features extended solos for them and they have a field day displaying those 'french' characteristics.

Offline yoyoman_hey

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #54 on: November 29, 2008, 05:25:36 PM »
Sorry for sidetracking the discussion here, but I just wanted to express my admiration for Ravel's solo piano work. I've only recently started listening some pieces, but Le Tombeau de Couperin and the piano version of Pavane Pour une Infante Defunte have been especially captivating. I've been hoping to delve into Mirroirs and Gaspard de la nuit, and if they're anything as engrossing as the two works I have heard so far, then I'm in for a real treat!

-Justin

Lilas Pastia

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #55 on: November 29, 2008, 05:41:44 PM »
Jeux d'eau has always been a favourite.

Offline yoyoman_hey

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #56 on: November 29, 2008, 05:48:17 PM »
Great, thanks for the reccomendation!

I think I have a recording of that piece; I think I'll check it out now.

Besides Debussy, is there any other composer with a similar style? I know that the two of them are often grouped together as 'impressionists', but I'd be curious to hear more from a lesser known composer. Perhaps someone influenced by Ravel?

-Justin

Offline Lethevich

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #57 on: November 30, 2008, 01:04:28 AM »
Besides Debussy, is there any other composer with a similar style? I know that the two of them are often grouped together as 'impressionists', but I'd be curious to hear more from a lesser known composer. Perhaps someone influenced by Ravel?

A question that seems to be asked a lot, but is never satisfactorily answered :( The nearest I can think of is Gershwin, on the piano side of things. Delius is often lumped into this group by people, but I find his work far more romantic and less crystallised than either Debussy or Ravel. Messiaen's early music has influences from these two composers.
Peanut butter, flour and sugar do not make cookies. They make FIRE.

Lilas Pastia

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #58 on: November 30, 2008, 07:46:46 PM »
Aspects of Ravel and Debussy can indeed be found in Gershwin and Delius. Chamber music is more elusive than orchestra or piano, but listen to their string quartets Debussy and Ravel, that is!).

There are also many stylistic kinships with other early 20th Century compositions. Vaughan-Williams studied with Ravel (who was his junior by 3 years  :o). I don't think anybody studied with Debussy, but many composers were influenced by him.

I think it's better to become thoroughly acquainted with these two before branching out here and there. The journey will be even more rewarding. I know that Debussy is viewed as the more important and influential of the two composers, but I find Ravel more rewarding and far-reaching.

Kullervo

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Re: Ravel's Rotunda
« Reply #59 on: November 30, 2008, 07:53:00 PM »
Frank Bridge's early music has something of Debussy about it (shades of late Scriabin in his music after WWI).

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