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Koch plays a program with Vihuela and baroque guitar. The vihuela playing didn't grab me (and it's recorded with a lot of reverb and distance) but the baroque guitar stuff on this album by Koch is stunning. He has a very soft smooth touch which some may not like but I find beautiful.
There's this Vihuela recording as well:
The sound is really good on this one - much better than the Vihuela tracks on the Koch - and Bonavita has a jazzy style in playing early Spanish music. He makes it sound very modern. I'm not sure what I think about that yet.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Wanderer on Today at 05:55:29 AM »
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The Diner / Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Last post by k a rl h e nn i ng on Today at 05:55:11 AM »
Last night:  Yojimbo (1961) and Play It Again, Sam (1972)

The latter was based on Woody Allen’s 1969 play, in which he also starred (demonstrating that he has acting chops beyond ‘mere stand-up’) together with Diane Keaton and Jerry Lacy.  Curiously, the film was directed not by Allen himself, but by Herbert Ross.  Ebert remarks that the film has a predictability which is to be expected from its B’way play origins (it opened at the Broadhurst Theatre), but which (I paraphrase, perhaps) hardly matters in a movie this funny.

SPOILER ALERT (for any to whom the movie is, erm, not yet known) The ending of the film rhymes the iconic film which is famously misquoted in the title;  my question, I guess, is how that worked on stage.  At first, I consider that it ‘might not work’;  but being in the theatre has its own sense of suspension of disbelief, and it may work just fine.

END SPOILER ALERT

It was in auditioning for the role of Linda that Keaton first met Allen.

Near the end of the first run of the play, Allen left the show and was replaced by (wait for it) Bob Denver.

Tony Roberts, so far as I can tell, plays essentially the same character all the time to a much more thorough degree than might be suggested for Allen himself;  and here he plays an utterly realistic New York business type who (in that era) went nowhere without telling his office what phone number he might be reached at.  Which (for me) makes it all the more interesting that the movie elected to relocate the action to San Francisco (the play is, of course, set in NY).  This makes climatological sense, so that there is romantic fog for the closing scene at the airport.

I see I have not said anything about Yojimbo, but I hardly need to.

Why should that stop me?

I don’t think it is merely nostalgist of me that I love the look of b-&-w film.  (Tangentially, I also watched a Twilight Zone episode last night, “And When the Sky Was Opened.”)  Curiously, and even though one could not really say that the musical materials are ‘owned’ by this or that genre . . . while listening to the lovely score (the sound a little dated, though not distractingly so, the Blu ray reproduction is sweetly sonorous) I found myself wondering if the minimalist melodic minor third (sometimes in this or that wind instrument, sometimes in . . . harpsichord!) suggested to the Wild West.  Of course, there is something of a barbaric rawness to the spare material, not specific to New Mexico Texas Almeria.

In just the same way, I expect, as I can just about equally love three perfectly different productions of Hamlet, my enjoyment of Yojimbo, Fistful of Dollars, and Last Man Standing.  Probably you expect this of a composer, but I thoroughly admire how Masaru Sato, Ennio Morricone (the pseudonym Dan Savio in the credits threw me, I admit) and Ry Cooder each created a musical environment which helped define the film.  Of Mifune, Eastwood and Willis, there is no arguing that Mifune is the strongest actor (and not merely a matter of the nature of the weapon requiring more elegant physicality);  but that does not diminish either American actor.  Again, the role in each film is an enjoyably distinct character.  Eastwood’s legendarily laconic character (which he scrabbled down through initial struggles with Leone, whose original script had much more dialogue for the part) contrasts very agreeably with Willis’s, who in the noir manner communicates mostly via voice-overs.


And here I am still not saying much about Yojimbo.  It's great!
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by aligreto on Today at 05:29:28 AM »
Brahms: Piano Quintet Op. 34 [Leipziger Streichquartett/Staier]....





This is a wonderful work which is given a fine performance here. The recording, however, is a bit “hollow”, lightweight and recessed in a dry acoustic for me. This does not detract from a fine performance however.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Mandryka on Today at 05:13:42 AM »
Hmm, what 18th C music are you thinking of here, in particular?

That's such a good question I don't want to spoil it by giving an answer.
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Ah yes, it's a bugger when that happens, 18th, first half only, and even then nothing too galant or what the French call High Baroque and Classicism or anything like that. 18th century music that anticipated Carter quartets.
Hmm, what 18th C music are you thinking of here, in particular?
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Mandryka on Today at 04:33:20 AM »
17th or 18th century music?


Thread-duty - first listen
Cavalieri
Rappresentatione di anima et di corpo
Johanette Zomer, Stephan van Dyck, Jan Van Elsacker, Stephan MacLeod, Dominique Vissé, Nuria Rial, Béatrice Mayo Felip
L'Arpeggiata
Pluhar



Ah yes, it's a bugger when that happens, 18th, first half only, and even then nothing too galant or what the French call High Baroque and Classicism or anything like that. 18th century music that anticipated Carter quartets.
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K 296 is good on piano I think, there's a fabulous recording by Marco Farolfi. It's a sonata that means a lot to me because it was one of the pieces which made me decide to explore 17th century music, I remember being completely bowled over by Farolfi's CD.
17th or 18th century music?


Thread-duty - first listen
Cavalieri
Rappresentatione di anima et di corpo
Johanette Zomer, Stephan van Dyck, Jan Van Elsacker, Stephan MacLeod, Dominique Vissé, Nuria Rial, Béatrice Mayo Felip
L'Arpeggiata
Pluhar

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This has always been a favourite disc of mine, particularly the gloriously impassioned version of the Franck by Chung and Lupu and the superb Melos Ensemble version of Ravel's sublime Introduction and Allegro.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Mandryka on Today at 04:05:42 AM »


K296, which may (still) be my favourite single Scarlatti sonata.

I am strongly considering listening to all 556 in order now, with score, and making notes about individual sonatas to remember them, but that seems a little too nerdy even by my standards. Also not sure when I would have the 36 free hours.

K 296 is good on piano I think, there's a fabulous recording by Marco Farolfi. It's a sonata that means a lot to me because it was one of the pieces which made me decide to explore 17th century music, I remember being completely bowled over by Farolfi's CD.
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