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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Cato on Today at 03:38:55 PM »
I suppose that is the reason.

Recently I have also been revisiting the 3 early symphonies of Tchaikovsky: a particularly exuberant finale in the Second Symphony!




Right now I am revisiting the last three symphonies.  Antoni Wit and his Poles give a fine performance of the Fourth Symphony.  I first heard it - without realizing it - when I saw The Phantom of the Opera with  Claude Rains/Nelson Eddy .  There is an opera sequence which uses the music from the Fourth Symphony.  I saw this in the late 1950's on T.V.

A year or two later, when I was ransacking the classical section of the public library's main building in downtown Dayton, I saw a mono recording of the Fourth Symphony with Eugene Ormandy and The Philadelphia Orchestra.  A thrilling performance, which they improved in the mid-1960's with one in stereo! 

I see that the stereo version is only available in a collection:




The Fifth Symphony in the Antoni Wit/Polish National is also excellent!  My first experience with that was also via a mono recording (Stereo was not always available when I was discovering classical music in my childhood) from Serge Koussevitzky and the Boston Symphony.  THAT was an intense performance!  The record was NOT a 78, so it must have been recorded in the early 1950's before his death, or was a reissue of an earlier 78 rpm performance..




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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by HIPster on Today at 03:37:50 PM »
Playing this enchanting disc of early Mozart Symphonies:



I love the way Dombrecht and Co. bring these to life.  :)
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I listened to the SWR symphoniker led by Hanz Holliger in these orchestral songs and I followed with these choral works and melodies with piano


This left me puzzled as the Holliger CD sounds very romantic through a lush orchestral texture.  The Timpani CD is more along the french impressionist style expected from the early Koechlin.  The different rendering leaves me puzzled: the (different) opus numbers in both cds  are close to one another (from.op 5 to op 17) suggesting that they were composed roughly during the same period.  The rational explaination would be to say that its Koechin orchestration that changes everything.  Another possibility is that it is the sound of Holliger orchestra.  Anyway, one thing which is sure is that there is more than one Koechlin that meets the ear... ;)

Yes, there are different Koechlins. ;) His approach to orchestration is totally singular. The reason the Holliger-led recordings sound the way they do is because that’s the way Koechlin had orchestrated them. If you listen to any of his orchestral works, you can tell who the composer is within a few measures. I do think Koechlin’s goals in orchestral music vs his choral, chamber, solo piano music, etc are quite different from one genre to the next. His style does change from work to work and the period of his development is difficult to chart since so much of his music has yet to be recorded. Whatever the case may be, his orchestral music is my favorite part of his oeuvre that I’ve heard. I just can’t get into his chamber music. It comes across as pretty albeit without much of his individual stamp that makes the orchestral music so special to me. YMMV however.

Indeed !  No words can really do justice to these magnificent songs (some of them quite extended songs, actually). An oniric, sensual, crepuscular tinge permeates them.

I can only nod my head in agreement (as if I was going to disagree in the first-place). ;)
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by André on Today at 03:17:45 PM »
Quatre Poemes d'Edmond Haraucourt, Op. 7:



As Andre already knows, this whole set is exquisite. If anyone is into early 20th Century French songs, then I highly recommend this Koechlin set.

Indeed !  No words can really do justice to these magnificent songs (some of them quite extended songs, actually). An oniric, sensual, crepuscular tinge permeates them.

............................................................................................

From this set:




Sonatas by Debussy and Ravel (recorded 1943), Bach (1956), concertos by Brahms (1958), Tchaikovsky (1950), Bruch (1952).

Michèle Auclair was the first winner of the Jacques Thibaud - Marguerite Long competition along with Samson François, in 1943. I think it’s not farfetched to find in her playing qualities similar to those of François: an uncanny ability to « get » the right mood and musical line of a work beyond the notes of the score.

According to some commentators she coupled the best features of the franco-belgian school of violin playing with that of the russian (her principal teachers were the French Boucherit and Thibaud and the Russian Kamensky, with the Belgian Eugene Ysaÿe being a common link between Thibaud and Kamensky).

A fiery performer, her playing is way above mere virtuoso fiddling. Her performances of the Brahms and Tchaikovsky concertos are mesmerizing in their musical nobility and jaw-dropping in their brilliance. Her tone reminds me of Grumiaux’ in its unerring accuracy and sweetness, and Szeryng’s in its steely brilliance. I found her Brahms more beautiful than Ginette Neveu’s while sharing with that legendary performer a natural authority that asserts itself from the very first notes. This is ‘sit up and take notice’ music-making.

The Bach sonatas in this set are those for violin and keyboard, here played by Marie-Claire Alain...on the organ ! This was the first time I heard this instrumental combination and it works superbly. She made precious few recordings, but there are two of the Tchaikovsky concerto. It can be sampled on YT here:


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9Ozx3TMRaqE
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Spineur on Today at 03:06:02 PM »
Excellent! 8) Do let me know how you get on with it, Spineur.
I listened to the SWR symphoniker led by Hanz Holliger in these orchestral songs and I followed with these choral works and melodies with piano


This left me puzzled as the Holliger CD sounds very romantic through a lush orchestral texture.  The Timpani CD is more along the french impressionist style expected from the early Koechlin.  The different rendering leaves me puzzled: the (different) opus numbers in both cds  are close to one another (from.op 5 to op 17) suggesting that they were composed roughly during the same period.  The rational explaination would be to say that its Koechin orchestration that changes everything.  Another possibility is that it is the sound of Holliger orchestra.  Anyway, one thing which is sure is that there is more than one Koechlin that meets the ear... ;)
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First-Listen Sundays!

Frank Martin’s String Quartet:

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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Wanderer on Today at 02:42:50 PM »
.

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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by jessop on Today at 02:22:50 PM »
Listening to this disc of works by Isabel Mundry, a really nice programme of music where other pieces of hers are placed fairly evenly between movements of Dufay-Bearbeitungen. It gives a real sense of this disc as being one single listening experience to hear all the way through, rather than just separate pieces one after another. Hoping to get in contact with Mundry soon.



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The Jazz Lounge / Re: What Jazz are you listening to now?
« Last post by SimonNZ on Today at 02:22:39 PM »


Ramsey Lewis - Down To Earth (1959)
Mark Feldman and Sylvie Courvoisier - Malphas:John Zorn's Book of Angels, Vol. 3 (2006)
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Great historical performances:

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