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Achilles cannot have been pre-pubescent because on the way to Troy he begets a son, Neoptolemos (who does lots of butchery in the sack of Troy, as far as I recall). Of course, epics are hardly consistent as far as ages go (Penelope has a 20 year old son but is never understood as around 40, o.k. maybe she is 36, but nevertheless the fervor of the suitors lusting for her seems to indicate that age does not play a role here.)

I do not recall if there is a special word for war companions. But otherwise friendship is philia and love eros. eromenos (beloved, usually the younger) would be diffferent from philos.
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Robert Graves mentions the age of 15, citing Homer himself [The Greek Myths, Graves, 160.l], but I haven't been able to track down the exact passage—the version of the Iliad Graves was working from may have had different numbering or may have had passages that are now considered apocryphal. However, he does lead to some useful passages. In one, Phoenix says:

It was to thee that the old horseman Peleus sent me on the day when he sent thee to Agamemnon, forth from Phthia, [440] a mere child, knowing naught as yet of evil war...

Iliad, Murray, ix.438-440

What is interesting about that passage, when you go to Greek, is that Homer uses the term νήπιον ("nhay-pee-on") which not only means child, but in some cases, specifically a pre-pubescent child. (The LSJ entry from the word link makes direct reference to this passage in the Iliad.)
https://mythology.stackexchange.com/questions/1995/how-old-were-paris-and-achilles-at-the-time-of-the-trojan-war

Achilles reaching puberty and begetting a son on the voyage seems plausible, for Ancient Greek mythology at least.




Patroclus and the beardless Achilles tending to his wound.
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Ordered:

Lodewijk Mortelmans: Homerische Symphonie

Cecil Armstrong Gibbs: Symphonie "Odysseus"

Gabriel Faure: Penelope

Arthur Bliss: Morning Heroes (Eine Symphonie für Sprecher, Chor, Orchester)

Michael Tippett: King Priam  (Medium: Blu-ray Disc)

Malcolm Arnold: The Return of Odysseus op.119 für Chor & Orchester

I bought the Armstrong Gibbs 'Odysseus' Symphony - possibly as part of a Dutton promotion - and now can't remember a single thing about it, good or bad. It doesn't seem to have made much of an impression. I will be interested to know what you make of it.
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In some ways, my favorite from Tuesday's concert:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/2tKeyWRP5h8" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/2tKeyWRP5h8</a>
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There's only one thing worse than having your work disliked by people, at least to be disliked is to provoke some reaction, but when your work is not even worth a comment, either good or bad, then I think it's time to stop posting it.
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Composing and Performing / Re: Henning's Headquarters
« Last post by k a rl h e nn i ng on Today at 01:10:39 AM »
And at last, the return of Kurosawa’s Scarecrow

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/2tKeyWRP5h8" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/2tKeyWRP5h8</a>
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The Diner / Re: Dreams of 2020
« Last post by k a rl h e nn i ng on Today at 01:04:53 AM »
“Aleppo” was a clear gaffe by Johnson. But was it any worse than a candidate declaring (among a flood of nonsense and lies) that Putin would not go into Ukraine after that had already happened? The candidate who said that, Donald Trump, eventually won the overwhelming support of the so-called conservatives. “Aleppo” became an excuse to not vote for somebody they weren’t voting for anyway.

Weld’s level of polish is completely irrelevant. He needs support from people who care about their team winning more than they care about the differences between Trump and him. He won’t get it even if he runs a perfect campaign.

I once had some hope that the Libertarian party could eventually become a legitimate factor by gradually peeling supporters from both major parties. But after seeing how thoroughly the Republicans closed ranks around even Donald Trump, and even when the Libertarian candidate had relatively strong credentials, I now realize how completely futile that cause is even in the long term.

Your points, all well taken.
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The Diner / Re: Cato's Grammar Grumble
« Last post by k a rl h e nn i ng on Today at 01:03:58 AM »
They are actually almost all spelling errors or is this part of the joke?

It is indeed, although your true grammar nerd maintains a distinction between poor grammar and bad spelling  8)
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Achilles cannot have been pre-pubescent because on the way to Troy he begets a son, Neoptolemos (who does lots of butchery in the sack of Troy, as far as I recall). Of course, epics are hardly consistent as far as ages go (Penelope has a 20 year old son but is never understood as around 40, o.k. maybe she is 36, but nevertheless the fervor of the suitors lusting for her seems to indicate that age does not play a role here.)

I do not recall if there is a special word for war companions. But otherwise friendship is philia and love eros. eromenos (beloved, usually the younger) would be diffferent from philos.
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Thanks! This would be my interpretation as well.
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I thought it was “Grande” as well, but it was apparently published without that adjective. “Große Humoreske” is from Schumann’s letters to Clara as far as I’m aware—I have not seen the original German but this is corroborated by Jörg Demus in the liner notes to his MdG recording. I imagine it was intended as poetic irony.
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