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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Mandryka on Today at 07:47:25 AM »
Bach

One of my most cherished works.

Gestern Die Kunst der Fuge gehört. Herrlich! Ein Werk das bisher für Mathematik gehalten wurde. Tiefste Musik!"   Alban Berg



I'll be interested to read what you make of Asperen's. My copy arrived yesterday and so far I can say this: it is very well recorded and has courageous and  imaginative ideas.
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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: New Releases
« Last post by Todd on Today at 07:43:17 AM »


















The last disc features a straight strung Chris Maene piano.  I kinda want to hear the disc for that reason alone.  (It's Daniel Barenboim's new piano.)  I hope the playing is better than the god awful suit the pianist opted to wear for the cover shot.  The shoes are nice enough, though.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by kyjo on Today at 07:41:48 AM »


How are they, Cesar? I’d be interested to know.  :)
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Traverso on Today at 07:18:25 AM »
Bach

One of my most cherished works.

Gestern Die Kunst der Fuge gehört. Herrlich! Ein Werk das bisher für Mathematik gehalten wurde. Tiefste Musik!"   Alban Berg





 
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Todd on Today at 07:07:11 AM »



Over the last week, thanks to streaming, I got to sample the entire new Borodin Quartet DSCH set before deciding whether to buy.  The playing is very fine, and even streaming the sound is up to date, but I can't say that it has the impact of the older, Melodiya cycle.  That written, some of the late quartets come off very well, especially the 12th and 14th.  Alexei Volodin joins the ensemble in the Piano Quintet, and he does better work here than on his mixed rep disc, but here the older recording has Richter at the keyboard.  (And then there's Michail Lifits' recent version with the Szymanowski Quartet, which is arguably better yet.)  I'm on the fence, but the set is mid-priced, so it may be hard to resist getting a proper copy.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by "Harry" on Today at 07:02:07 AM »
.


At first encounter,  I felt somewhat cheated since this recording mainly contains contemporary arrangements of violin/trio sonatas. 
Some of which are familiar repertoire.

But recorder fans will undoubtedly enjoin the wondeful performances.

Q

Well at least she is pretty, that must count too :)
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The Diner / Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Last post by Todd on Today at 06:56:48 AM »



Game Night.  Fast-paced, witty in a contrived but entertaining way, with some good sight gags and more blood and violence than anticipated going in (I had read nothing about it), it's good enough to kill some time.  It could have been better had Sharon Horgan been better utilized.
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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: Recordings That You Are Considering
« Last post by Todd on Today at 06:52:42 AM »
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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: The Asian Invasion
« Last post by Todd on Today at 06:51:50 AM »



I enjoyed Tomoko Matsuoka's Scarlatti sufficiently so that I figured I should try another Japanese harpsichordist in this music.  I opted for Eiji Hashimoto's selection of eighteen sonatas recorded for the Klavier label.  Mr Hashimoto was born and raised in Japan, spent some time studying with Ralph Kirkpatrick, taught for a while at Toho School of Music, and then he spent a long time at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music before retiring in 2001.  He was good enough to catch the ear of Rudolf Serkin and ended up performing at Marlboro.  In addition to playing the harpsichord, Hashimoto also put together his own edition of one hundred Scarlatti sonatas, with said edition still available.  (There's also a three volume edition of ninety sonatas readily available.)  So he's an artist and a scholar.

This disc includes some less frequently recorded sonatas, which is fine, since lesser known of the sonatas need more love.  Hashimoto certainly knows the music and knows what he wants to do.  Some of the sonatas, and many sections of pretty much every sonata, come off very well.  His ornamentation is generally just fine.  However, his frequent use of pauses often interrupts the forward flow of the music.  He does this in pretty much every sonata, and sometimes it works better than others, but it ends up tipping into distracting mannerism before the disc is done.  Some of the phrasing also sounds stiff in a number of sonatas, lacking the sense of playfulness or rhythmic vitality found in other versions, harpsichord or piano.  As a result, the disc is one with some very fine moments and a greater abundance of less fine moments.

I streamed the disc, and sound is excellent even that way.  The few Klavier discs I own all have demonstration quality sound, so I would not be surprised if a physical copy of this disc does as well.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Daverz on Today at 06:48:31 AM »
String Quartet No.1
One of the great string quartets in my view. On an epic scale - like a symphony.



Nearly an hour long, but the time goes by quickly.

The Pro Arte Quartet on Laurel Records is also excellent and in stereo. 

https://www.laurelrecord.com/
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