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The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: vandermolen on December 14, 2007, 12:21:22 AM

Title: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on December 14, 2007, 12:21:22 AM
I don't expect much response here but I thought it worth drawing attention to two new releases of music by this largely unknown but (in my view) very worthwhile composer (the teacher of Bliss at Cambridge).

EMI have just issued an excellent CD of choral/orchestral works, including the excellent "For the Fallen" as part of an issue of several releases to commemorate Armistice Day in the UK (Foulds's "A World Requiem" was performed on the day itself this year in London). The EMI CD has given me great pleasure; the Miniature Suite for piano and and strings is a lovely, charming work and, as in the music of John Ireland, Rootham understates the emotion which, paradoxically, makes it more poignant.

Lyrita have also issued Rootham's Symphony of the 1930s. One of my favourite issues of the old Lyrita LP catalogue, it is coupled with music by Bantock and Holbrooke and is IMHO one of the best of the newly released Lyrita CDs (my other great discovery was Arthur Benjamin's epic Symphony of 1945). Both these works would, I think appeal to admirers of Vaughan Williams and Moeran. The Rootham Symphony (and I hope that his Symphony 2, completed just before his death, is recorded one day) is a great work with slapping brass and a "big tune" in the last movement, which reminded me of the end of the first movement of Vaughan Williams's Sixth Symphony (the slow movement of the Arthur Benjamin Symphony also reminded me of the VW symphony 6...his greatest in my view).

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_ss_w_h_?url=search-alias%3Dclassical&field-keywords=rootham&Go.x=3&Go.y=8


There's an article about Rootham here:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/Rootham/index.htm
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Montpellier on December 14, 2007, 03:24:06 AM
I bought the Lyrita CD mainly for the Holbrooke, a work I easily fell for.   I didn't give the Rootham Symphony a fair listen but I put the EMI disc on my MDT wish list so I presume I liked it.   I'll run it again today and also get that MDT order going. 
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: springrite on December 14, 2007, 03:26:39 AM
I do have the Lyrita LP in question and quite like the work, but have not listened to it in ages since I no longer have a serviceable turntable.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on December 14, 2007, 09:48:46 AM
I plan signing up to eMusic,m where Lyrita recordings can now be downloaded at a very low price, so I'm grateful for your pointer, Vandermolen. You have whetted my appetite...
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on December 14, 2007, 11:13:10 AM
Thanks for responses  :)

The new EMI CD (a reissue of an LP which, I think, must have been one of the last EMI classical LPs (c 1987)) is well worth investigating. Both this and the Lyrita recording of the Symphony are relatively inexpensive (on UK Amazon).

Look out for that Arthur Benjamin symphony too:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Benjamin-Orchestral-Works-Arthur/dp/B000N8UVSA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1197659773&sr=1-1
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Dundonnell on December 14, 2007, 06:02:37 PM
I have no difficulty agreeing with you regarding Rootham's 1st Symphony! A good, solid and sometimes impressive contribution to the list of inter-war British symphonies. It does make one wonder what Rootham's 2nd symphony-written under the shadow of fatal illness and completed by Patrick Hadley-does sound like. The adjective 'apocalyptic' which has beeen used to describe the 2nd is certainly intriguing!
I did think that the Lyrita coupling of the Rootham with works by composers so different to him in Holbrooke and Bantock was rather odd but I suppose that there can be a case for variety within the same disc.

I was also impressed by the EMI CD recently reissued. The short choral pieces included are models of classical restraint but extremely beautiful. It is sad that Rootham's setting of Binyon's 'For the Fallen' led to a dispute with Elgar, whose own setting(part of "The Spirit of England") was published second. The CD does remind us-once again-the huge debt we owe to Richard Hickox in championing over the years so many British choral compositions. It does worry me to speculate on which conductors will follow Hickox, Handley and David Lloyd-Jones  in keeping the flame alive in the future.

Thanks also for reminding me that Bliss was a pupil of Rootham. This has given me an idea for a new thread!
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on December 15, 2007, 08:48:21 AM
Perhaps Rumon Gamba, a talented young conductor will carry forward the interest in works of lesser-known British composers. His Chandos Film Music Series (Rawsthorne,Alwyn, Vaughan Williams etc) has been very promising as was his Chandos CD of the last three Arnold symphonies (symbolically perhaps, taking up the torch from Richard Hickox, who had conducted the Chandos recordings of the earlier symphonies).
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Montpellier on December 15, 2007, 11:32:44 AM

I did think that the Lyrita coupling of the Rootham with works by composers so different to him in Holbrooke and Bantock was rather odd but I suppose that there can be a case for variety within the same disc. 

Are they so different?  They sounded in the same realm - the Rootham 2nd movement bore similarities with the Holbrooke, perhaps darker.  However, I know too little about Rootham, not much more about Holbrooke, just this disc and some chamber music.  The Holbrooke seemed to have affinity with Bantock's Fifine at the opening string chorus.

However,
Quote
I was also impressed by the EMI CD recently reissued. The short choral pieces included are models of classical restraint but extremely beautiful.

I've ordered this disc now and look forward to it.  There isn't much of this composer about, nor Holbrooke for that matter but every little helps. 

Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on December 15, 2007, 11:55:19 PM
Are they so different?  They sounded in the same realm - the Rootham 2nd movement bore similarities with the Holbrooke, perhaps darker.  However, I know too little about Rootham, not much more about Holbrooke, just this disc and some chamber music.  The Holbrooke seemed to have affinity with Bantock's Fifine at the opening string chorus.

However,  
I've ordered this disc now and look forward to it.  There isn't much of this composer about, nor Holbrooke for that matter but every little helps. 



I'm sure that you'll enjoy the EMI CD. I've played it many times over the past couple of weeks. It is a very well put together programme. The Miniature Suite is charming and "For the Fallen" is moving. For a CD it's a bit short on playing time c 50+mins as EMI have simple duplicated an LP; pity they couldn't have added something more...but maybe I am greedy. Like Dunnodell I'm very curious about Rootham's unrecorded Second Symphony from the very end of his life.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Montpellier on December 20, 2007, 07:13:17 AM
I'm sure that you'll enjoy the EMI CD. I've played it many times over the past couple of weeks. It is a very well put together programme. The Miniature Suite is charming and "For the Fallen" is moving. For a CD it's a bit short on playing time c 50+mins as EMI have simple duplicated an LP; pity they couldn't have added something more...but maybe I am greedy. Like Dunnodell I'm very curious about Rootham's unrecorded Second Symphony from the very end of his life.
Yes, on first listening - most pleasant.   I've still to listen to "For the Fallen".   The CD arrived this morning, I made an MP3 so I could listen while about town - not the best conditions and this music demands listening in peace and quiet which I'll do this evening unless something goes wrong!   The music has clean lines, clean harmony, beautiful choral balance and the texture never seems to get clogged.  I hate to say this and hope it offends no one, I find it somewhat easier than similar from Holst.   Definitely glad I bought the CD. 

Symphonies by Daniel Jones arrived at the same time, maybe I should start a thread on him.   A very different music. 
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on December 20, 2007, 11:55:55 AM
Yes, on first listening - most pleasant.   I've still to listen to "For the Fallen".   The CD arrived this morning, I made an MP3 so I could listen while about town - not the best conditions and this music demands listening in peace and quiet which I'll do this evening unless something goes wrong!   The music has clean lines, clean harmony, beautiful choral balance and the texture never seems to get clogged.  I hate to say this and hope it offends no one, I find it somewhat easier than similar from Holst.   Definitely glad I bought the CD. 

Symphonies by Daniel Jones arrived at the same time, maybe I should start a thread on him.   A very different music. 

Pleased you are enjoying it. "For the Fallen" is the highlight of the CD for me, so I'll be very interested to hear what you think of it. I like the symphonies of Daniel Jones although he is a tougher nut to crack. Rootham's Miniature Suite is very charming.

I'm listening to Shostakovich's 11th Symphony at the moment, which is altogether quite different!
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Dundonnell on December 20, 2007, 02:09:05 PM
Yes, on first listening - most pleasant.   I've still to listen to "For the Fallen".   The CD arrived this morning, I made an MP3 so I could listen while about town - not the best conditions and this music demands listening in peace and quiet which I'll do this evening unless something goes wrong!   The music has clean lines, clean harmony, beautiful choral balance and the texture never seems to get clogged.  I hate to say this and hope it offends no one, I find it somewhat easier than similar from Holst.   Definitely glad I bought the CD. 

Symphonies by Daniel Jones arrived at the same time, maybe I should start a thread on him.   A very different music. 

You should start a thread on Daniel Jones! Happy to join you there if you do. If you don't, then I shall start one myself!
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Montpellier on December 24, 2007, 05:35:50 AM
I've found For the Fallen a very satisfying and poignant work.   Beautifully constructed.   

The Miniature Suite has sound and texture not unlike George Butterworth, the little music he wrote, a composer I find so easy to listen to.  Definitely a worthwhile buy.  It's also drawn my attention back to his Symphony. 

Great.

(I'll have a look at Daniel Jones later.  I need to d/ld the string quartets, noting that Chandos offer the service.

Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Sydney Grew on December 28, 2007, 03:45:46 PM
I don't expect much response here but I thought it worth drawing attention to two new releases of music by this largely unknown but (in my view) very worthwhile composer (the teacher of Bliss at Cambridge).

Thank you for the recommendation! We shall look out for Rootham's music. Oddly enough his name is not mentioned in Norman Lebrecht's book on Twentieth Century Music, a reliable work to which we are accustomed to turn for information about unknown composers.

Grove of course provides something, but even there we find only a "selective list" of his works, and there are among them a great many written for chorus. The most ambitious of Rootham's choral works with orchestra is said to be the Ode on the Morning of Christ's Nativity, dating from 1928.

Will it not be an admirable thing when in a few years' time the internet has matured to the extent that we may retrieve at the press of a button a recorded performance of any one of the complete works of men such as Rootham! Will it happen in our life-time we wonder?
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: longears on December 28, 2007, 03:58:31 PM
Will it not be an admirable thing when in a few years' time the internet has matured to the extent that we may retrieve at the press of a button a recorded performance of any one of the complete works of men such as Rootham! Will it happen in our life-time we wonder?
Listen to his complete first symphony here. (http://www.emusic.com/album/Various-Artists-Bantock-Holbrooke-Rootham-Overture-to-a-Greek-MP3-Download/11094002.html)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on July 25, 2012, 01:18:18 PM
I have a CD of the Second Symphony now - a very fine and darkly moving score, written under the shadow of a fatal illness. Lyrical, valedictory (certainly not 'apocalyptic') with a choral finale, it cries out for a commercial release (Dutton?) The orchestration was completed by Patrick Hadley. Anyone who responds to Bax or Alwyn should enjoy this, although the work has a warmth and eloquence which is very much Rootham's own.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on July 27, 2012, 07:55:39 AM
Yes,I was impressed by this completion of No2. I will 'dig' my cdr out a bit later. I need another listen! Like Holst's entertaining,'The Perfect Fool' opera.it seems to be one of those works that's just crying out for a commercial cd release.
Enjoyed the Moeran 'Second',too.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on July 28, 2012, 04:18:54 AM
Yes,I was impressed by this completion of No2. I will 'dig' my cdr out a bit later. I need another listen! Like Holst's entertaining,'The Perfect Fool' opera.it seems to be one of those works that's just crying out for a commercial cd release.
Enjoyed the Moeran 'Second',too.

Yes, I agree - Dutton should do it (they have released some of Rootham's chamber music). I find the end of Rootham's Second Symphony to be very touching and the score altogether memorable. I must listen to the Moeran properly.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on August 05, 2012, 05:05:59 AM
Vandermolen really has got me going! :o ;D It's been Roothmania for the last few days here. After having his glorious First Symphony on repeat for hours on end,I downloaded some of the emi recordings,to make up a cdr of mainly orchestral works,although I 'threw' in 'The Stolen Child',for good measure. This,'The Psalm of Adonis' & the 'Miniature Suite' are all wonderfully compact. No note spinning here. This is one composer who knew when to stop! 'The Stolen Child' sounds particularly effective heard immeadiately after the Second. It sort of steals (geddit?! ;D) in on you! And his orchestration is always so clean,so transparent. No one could ever have accused him of over scoring.

The Second is more ambitious in scope,more sombre in tone.......and I'm impressed! :) But I need another listen,so after the current (afore mentioned) cdr ends,I will 'bung it on'!
After that,thanks to a musical friend,I have a big,ambitious choral blockbuster lined up!!! :P :)

Looking at the essay on Musicweb & the list of unrecorded works,it is hard to understand why a composer of this quality remains ignored by even the most imaginative of small cd labels! :(
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: snyprrr on August 05, 2012, 05:08:34 AM
Rootham

th = d

Rodham


Anyone? Anyone?


Bueller?
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on August 05, 2012, 06:31:07 AM
Actually,I wish I'd left out that last gripe (see last post!) Yes, I'm enjoying Rootham & I wish they'd record some more,but that kind of,chest beating, 'Why is this composer ignored' post is SO unoriginal! Dammit! I should be ashamed of myself! :o :-[ And what about poor old Lev Knipper?!! I mean,honestly!!! ;D
  John France,at Musicweb,reckons a Promenade performance of Rootham's First would "raise the rafters". Not sure about that myself. Much as I enjoy this symphony I feel that sort of observation does a work like this few favours. Anyway,it's just not that kind of music.
As far as I'm aware,even Havergal Brian's Gothic blockbuster didn't physically alter the altitude or solidity of any beam or joist! ;D

Is it possible for a piece of music to literally 'raise the roof' or 'bring the house down?'
I'm sure my old battered s/h pbk copy of Lyall Watson's (hippy favourite) 'Supernature',has a lot to say on the subject!


Any Royal Albert Hall carpenters or scientist/engineers are welcome to join this debate! :)

If ever Rootham's First Symphony gets a Prom hearing (if it hasn't had one) will I need to bring a crash helmet & suitable protective clothing? :( ;D

Just,in case........

Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on August 05, 2012, 07:33:15 AM
On a more serious note :o I have just found a D90 cassette,in my collection,of a performance of Rootham's First Symphony with the BBC Symphony orchestra conducted by Andrew Davis. Broadcast on June 20th 2004 & broadcast (in a specially made recording) as part of Brian Kay's '3 for All' programme;this should make for an interesting comparison to the Lyrita recording.
As luck would have it,I still play cassettes & actually use them to record off the radio,now & again! :o I have now slotted this into my dolby cassette deck,and.....whoa! This is definately one of my better recordings! A lovely,clear,expansive recording,to my ears? Well,not bad for me ;D & the performance sounds great. Very bracing. I now wish Andrew Davis would make a recording (or of the Second!). When I get a lead I will make a cdr!

Wow! The timpani in this recording is quite something! That almighty thwack,just then, nearly knocked me off my seat!!!! :o Good as the Lyrita recording is,the sonics here make me feel that this really would benefit from the sonics of modern state of the art recording! It really DOES add something! (Hopefully,not a cardiac arrest! :()

Update: Hm! :( I knew I was tempting fate! Unfortunately,the balance goes a bit funny,near the beginning of the finale! Definately,pro left ear 'ole! But,it could be worse. I remember now,the machine I used at the time had a dodgy button & you had to wedge it in place....usually,a matchstick! ;D As I say it could have been worse. (One channel,only,sometimes!)
Presumably,I can do something to even up the balance using 'Audacity'?
Must put that lead (cassette to pc) on my 'shopping list',now!

Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on August 07, 2012, 10:59:56 AM
It would be wonderful (though implausible) to hear Rootham's First Symphony at the Proms. The work which would, I believe, 'bring the house down' in the unlikely event of it ever being performed there, would be Richard Arnell's Third Symphony. Stanley Bate's Third and Fourth symphonies would also be great candidates (in my dreams).  Still, I lived to hear Moeran's 1st Symphony's prom premiere - so you never know.  :D
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on August 07, 2012, 12:39:33 PM
 ;D Indeed,who knows? I listened to Moeran's Violin Concerto the other night. Even if it isn't a masterpiece,it certainly wins,on all counts,as one of the most beautiful ever composed. (If beauty alone could get a work into the concert repertory it would be there!)
 I must admit I haven't heard Arnell's 3rd,but I dug out an off air cassette I made of his Piano Concerto & I must admit I was rather impressed. A sort of British answer to Prokofiev,very exciting. And the ancient old cassette worked too!

 You're enthusiasm here has really got me into Rootham. The Dutton booklet,with the cd of Violin Sonatas by (Rootham,Holbrooke,etc) refers to him as a quite prolific composer. Indeed,I was suprised at how much remains unrecorded. I hope this will be rectified,in due course. Nevertheless,despite my enthusiasm for Roothams First,I'm not too sure it would bring the house down;although a Prom performance would be rather nice,to say the least! Not that there's anything wrong with the Rootham;I love it & it's a very impressive symphony;but I just don't think it's a rafter raising kind of work! ;D
Bate's 3rd or Fourth,as you say,are more likely candidates,for a rafter shifting! And,maybe one day?!!!

Another dream. Brian's third symphony.
Bax's Second made it recently & judging by some of the reviews I saw,even if it didn't raise rafters,it did pretty well. Bax's First is another Prom day dream. That tremendous opening & the imposing,indeed exciting,second movement. I can see the critics nit picking about the final movement,though;so maybe it's better,sometimes,just to dream?!!

Anyway,enough of rafters! It's a Rootham thread after all,not a carpentry thread! ;D
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on August 08, 2012, 12:10:58 AM
;D Indeed,who knows? I listened to Moeran's Violin Concerto the other night. Even if it isn't a masterpiece,it certainly wins,on all counts,as one of the most beautiful ever composed. (If beauty alone could get a work into the concert repertory it would be there!)
 I must admit I haven't heard Arnell's 3rd,but I dug out an off air cassette I made of his Piano Concerto & I must admit I was rather impressed. A sort of British answer to Prokofiev,very exciting. And the ancient old cassette worked too!

 You're enthusiasm here has really got me into Rootham. The Dutton booklet,with the cd of Violin Sonatas by (Rootham,Holbrooke,etc) refers to him as a quite prolific composer. Indeed,I was suprised at how much remains unrecorded. I hope this will be rectified,in due course. Nevertheless,despite my enthusiasm for Roothams First,I'm not too sure it would bring the house down;although a Prom performance would be rather nice,to say the least! Not that there's anything wrong with the Rootham;I love it & it's a very impressive symphony;but I just don't think it's a rafter raising kind of work! ;D
Bate's 3rd or Fourth,as you say,are more likely candidates,for a rafter shifting! And,maybe one day?!!!

Another dream. Brian's third symphony.
Bax's Second made it recently & judging by some of the reviews I saw,even if it didn't raise rafters,it did pretty well. Bax's First is another Prom day dream. That tremendous opening & the imposing,indeed exciting,second movement. I can see the critics nit picking about the final movement,though;so maybe it's better,sometimes,just to dream?!!

Anyway,enough of rafters! It's a Rootham thread after all,not a carpentry thread! ;D

Actually I prefer Moeran's Cello Concerto and find the climax of the final movement overwhelming in the Coetmore/Boult version - much as I like the Violin Concerto too. I was there for the proms premiere of Bax's Symphony No 2 (and for a performance of Symphony No 5 in a half empty Albert Hall decades ago) - the only time I have heard Bax in concert. You must listen to the Arnell 3,5 and 5 symphonies, which I'm sure you would like. The return of the 'big tune' at the end of No 5 is a wonderful moment.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on August 08, 2012, 08:48:16 AM
I will program the Cello Concerto in,later. I must admit to being a recent convert to the Moeran Violin Concerto.I'm not that keen on Violin or Cello Concerto's generally. I don't know why! :( But there are exceptions,of course,besides the usual suspects! But the Moeran is so beautiful. It isn't highly regarded,but you just think of all those lovely landscapes. Since the Cello Concerto is the most highly regarded of the two,I'm obviously missing something. Programing it in & putting it on repeat should do the trick! ;D
Yes Arnell does sound interesting. The Piano Concerto doesn't get mentioned as much as the symphonies so if I like that,it stands to reason I'll like the symphonies.

By the way Vandermolen,were there many in the audience for Bax 2? I hope so. If there were more than two people things could be looking up! ;D
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on August 08, 2012, 11:20:32 AM
I will program the Cello Concerto in,later. I must admit to being a recent convert to the Moeran Violin Concerto.I'm not that keen on Violin or Cello Concerto's generally. I don't know why! :( But there are exceptions,of course,besides the usual suspects! But the Moeran is so beautiful. It isn't highly regarded,but you just think of all those lovely landscapes. Since the Cello Concerto is the most highly regarded of the two,I'm obviously missing something. Programing it in & putting it on repeat should do the trick! ;D
Yes Arnell does sound interesting. The Piano Concerto doesn't get mentioned as much as the symphonies so if I like that,it stands to reason I'll like the symphonies.

By the way Vandermolen,were there many in the audience for Bax 2? I hope so. If there were more than two people things could be looking up! ;D

Hello Cilgwyn - no I was not the only person in the Albert Hall for Bax's 2nd Symphony  ;D - as far as I recall the Albert Hall was quite full, but this may have been for the rest of the programme.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on August 09, 2012, 09:43:08 AM
Well,the important thing is,the hall WAS full! :) So maybe that will be an incentive to program some more. No 1,6 or Spring Fire would be good follow ups! A pity the performance can't be released on cd. Still,I've got my off air cassette! :o ;D

I put the Moeran Cello Concerto on last night. Unfortunately perhaps,the recording I own is the Chandos one. I hope this is adequate! The recording is spectacular,but on the reverberant side.
 On the plus side,this does add a cinematic sheen to the performance,which seems appropriate for a Concerto which strikes me as having a 'filmic',epic quality to it,quite distinct from most Cello Concerto's I have encountered;most of them being of an introspective,ruminative,autumnal or brooding nature;which is one of the reasons I generally don't like Cello Concerto's! Not that I'm an expert mind.Perhaps I just keep 'bumping into' the wrong ones! ;D
In fact Moeran's Cello Concerto strikes me as being a prime example of a Cello Concerto for people who think they don't like Cello Concerto's. It really does lift you up with it's warmth & passion. It's also,at times,very exciting & unlike the Violin Concerto it's all very purposeful,there's no 'oirish' note spinning!
In short,marvellous. I really enjoyed it. And I'm NOT just being polite! ;D

As a footnote,I put on the fillup item,the 'Sinfonietta'. The quiet bits are rather nice,but it's not one of his best. It seems to lack the kind of themes or ideas that stay in the mind. Worth an occasional hearing,though!

Back to Rootham! :o ;D

Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: alanmedrow on August 04, 2013, 02:38:33 AM
People, recommend Cyril Rootham for Radio 3's Composer of the Week.  I have just done this for their 70th birthday special: I have been into Rootham's music since I came across a relative of his at a Prom concert some years ago, and this composer definitely deserves more exposure...
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on August 20, 2013, 05:25:40 AM
People, recommend Cyril Rootham for Radio 3's Composer of the Week.  I have just done this for their 70th birthday special: I have been into Rootham's music since I came across a relative of his at a Prom concert some years ago, and this composer definitely deserves more exposure...

Rootham as Composer of the Week would certainly raise his reputation. I wonder if there is enough material though. He spent most of his life in academia.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: kyjo on August 20, 2013, 01:40:38 PM
I really enjoy Rootham's Symphony no. 1, which is a breezily energetic piece in the mold of Moeran's Symphony in G minor and Bliss' A Colour Symphony. One thing I find particularly successful about this work its concision; that there's not a note wasted, nor are there any pastoral meanderings which some British composers of the time (not wrongly) engage in from time to time.

(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2007/June07/bantock_SRCD269.jpg)

I also have this EMI disc, which includes the moving For the Fallen for chorus and orchestra:

(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2007/Dec07/rootham_5059232.jpg)

Two Rootham works I'd really like to see recorded are his Symphony no. 2 (which I've seen variously titled as Revelation and Apocalyptic) and his large-scale Ode on the Morning of Christ's Nativity for soloists, chorus and orchestra. A friend of mine and previously active member here, Colin (Dundonnell), compiled a catalogue of Rootham's orchestral music which is available on his marvelous website: http://composers.gulabin.com/ (http://composers.gulabin.com/)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on August 20, 2013, 02:17:09 PM
Yes, a commercial recording of Rootham's fine 2nd Symphony would be great. It is one of the great gaps in recordings of music by British composers, along with Ruth Gipps's Symphony No 4 - her masterpiece.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on October 08, 2013, 02:18:09 PM
I'm coming a bit late to join this discussion, but as the grandson of Cyril Rootham I would like to add some information.  We have recently launched a website for CBR at www.rootham.org, so now there is a fairly complete list of his works available both on the website and as an Excel spreadsheet to download.  I am still adding to the list of works, so any corrections will be gratefully received.

Works to record?  I too would love to see CBR's Second Symphony recorded, but I think a more likely candidate is the "Ode on the Morning of Christ's Nativity" which is currently being typeset for publication.  This effort to get CBR's works into print is voluntary work, so the edition may not be published for a few months.   

And there will be a chance to hear CBR's "For the Fallen" on 7 June 2014, when Ember Choral Society and Hampton Choral Society include it in their summer concert.  The programme also includes VW's "A Sea Symphony": it should be quite an evening!  See emberchoral.org.uk for details.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: kyjo on October 08, 2013, 05:07:47 PM
I'm coming a bit late to join this discussion, but as the grandson of Cyril Rootham I would like to add some information.  We have recently launched a website for CBR at www.rootham.org, so now there is a fairly complete list of his works available both on the website and as an Excel spreadsheet to download.  I am still adding to the list of works, so any corrections will be gratefully received.

Works to record?  I too would love to see CBR's Second Symphony recorded, but I think a more likely candidate is the "Ode on the Morning of Christ's Nativity" which is currently being typeset for publication.  This effort to get CBR's works into print is voluntary work, so the edition may not be published for a few months.   

And there will be a chance to hear CBR's "For the Fallen" on 7 June 2014, when Ember Choral Society and Hampton Choral Society include it in their summer concert.  The programme also includes VW's "A Sea Symphony": it should be quite an evening!  See emberchoral.org.uk for details.

Fascinating, Daniel! Welcome to the forum indeed. :)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on October 09, 2013, 11:30:32 AM
Thank you and welcome,Daniel. Cyril Rootham is a fine composer.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on October 10, 2013, 05:25:54 AM
I'm coming a bit late to join this discussion, but as the grandson of Cyril Rootham I would like to add some information.  We have recently launched a website for CBR at www.rootham.org, so now there is a fairly complete list of his works available both on the website and as an Excel spreadsheet to download.  I am still adding to the list of works, so any corrections will be gratefully received.

Works to record?  I too would love to see CBR's Second Symphony recorded, but I think a more likely candidate is the "Ode on the Morning of Christ's Nativity" which is currently being typeset for publication.  This effort to get CBR's works into print is voluntary work, so the edition may not be published for a few months.   

And there will be a chance to hear CBR's "For the Fallen" on 7 June 2014, when Ember Choral Society and Hampton Choral Society include it in their summer concert.  The programme also includes VW's "A Sea Symphony": it should be quite an evening!  See emberchoral.org.uk for details.

Daniel,

Welcome indeed! I was delighted to see a post from Rootham's grandson. Your grandfather was a very fine composer whose music, over many decades, has given me great pleasure. Right from the first appearance of Symphony No 1 on that Lyrita LP I have looked for more information/recordings of his music. There is a recordcc ing of Symphony No 2 but it has never been commercially released. It would be an ideal issue for Dutton and, in my CD fantasy life, coupled with Ruth Gipps's magnificent 4th Symphony. 'For the Fallen' and 'Miniature Sweet' are other firm favourites from that fine old EMI disc, which I discovered on LP in 1987. I shall look at the website with much interest. Thank you for posting here.

Added later:

The website looks very interesting. I was very pleased to read that Rootham promoted the work of Honneger, another favourite of mine and that he taught Armstrong Gibbs, whose 'Westmorland Symphony' is a very moving score.


Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on December 08, 2013, 02:26:13 PM
Thank you for the warm welcome, and my apologies for being slow in responding. 

There's something new on the Cyril Rootham website: a page where you can listen to some excerpts and a few entire works: 
http://rootham.org/listen.html
This forum is the first place where I have announced the new Listen page, so if anyone has suggestions or criticisms I will really be receptive. I'd like to get things straight before it hits a wider audience. Please don't hold back!

On a different topic: it's only in the last few weeks that I have discovered the joys of the British Library.  I have already listened to one CBR work there (Symphony No 2 conducted by Vernon Handley), a work which I had never heard except on the crackling 78s of the Adrian Boult 1939 recording.  The British Library staff are incredibly helpful and supportive, and I am hoping that in January/February both Symphony No 2 and some other gems will be transferred to the sound server in the BL.  That will mean that registered readers will be able to listen "on demand" rather than booking a listening appointment to load the reel-to-reel tape.  But obviously still by attending in person at the BL, not over the internet.

Thank you for any feedback.

Dan
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on December 09, 2013, 02:01:17 PM
Thank you for the warm welcome, and my apologies for being slow in responding. 

There's something new on the Cyril Rootham website: a page where you can listen to some excerpts and a few entire works: 
http://rootham.org/listen.html
This forum is the first place where I have announced the new Listen page, so if anyone has suggestions or criticisms I will really be receptive. I'd like to get things straight before it hits a wider audience. Please don't hold back!

On a different topic: it's only in the last few weeks that I have discovered the joys of the British Library.  I have already listened to one CBR work there (Symphony No 2 conducted by Vernon Handley), a work which I had never heard except on the crackling 78s of the Adrian Boult 1939 recording.  The British Library staff are incredibly helpful and supportive, and I am hoping that in January/February both Symphony No 2 and some other gems will be transferred to the sound server in the BL.  That will mean that registered readers will be able to listen "on demand" rather than booking a listening appointment to load the reel-to-reel tape.  But obviously still by attending in person at the BL, not over the internet.

Thank you for any feedback.

Dan

Hi Daniel,

The website is great. Couldn't get the Chiswick Choir in 'For the Fallen' to play but managed one synthesised midi work and ingenious the way that it follows the score. Yes, I do hope that there is a commercial recording of Symphony No. 2 soon.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on March 08, 2014, 07:17:54 AM
Many thanks for the comments.  The recording of the "For the Fallen" concert had a huge dynamic range, so that some parts (including the very beginning) were almost inaudible.  I have had the recording re-mastered for web playback, and I hope that you can now enjoy it.

And I have added a "Concerts" page on the Cyril Rootham website, giving details of three recitals or concerts over the next few months:
    http://rootham.org/concerts.html

And there will be more surprises to come on the Rootham website in about 6 weeks . . .

Best,
Dan
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on March 08, 2014, 02:00:48 PM
Many thanks for the comments.  The recording of the "For the Fallen" concert had a huge dynamic range, so that some parts (including the very beginning) were almost inaudible.  I have had the recording re-mastered for web playback, and I hope that you can now enjoy it.

And I have added a "Concerts" page on the Cyril Rootham website, giving details of three recitals or concerts over the next few months:
    http://rootham.org/concerts.html

And there will be more surprises to come on the Rootham website in about 6 weeks . . .

Best,
Dan

That is exciting news Dan. Thank you.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on July 10, 2015, 07:49:39 AM
This is a very exciting new release - for me anyway. Anyone who likes VW, Bliss etc should love the First Symphony on an earlier release. Rootham was the teacher of Bliss:


Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on July 11, 2015, 01:54:44 AM
Nice choice of artwork for the jewel case. Let us know what you think of this release. It has created great excitement at the AMF,with some pre-orders,already. And what other goodies have Lyrita got in store from us from Itter's vast 'off air' archive,I wonder? This is the kind of project music lovers of the less familiar and beaten track have been waiting years for!!! Commendable,to put it mildly!!
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on July 11, 2015, 02:05:18 AM
I managed to grab the uploads of these works from the AMF before they were removed. I will be making some cdr-s of them as soon as I have some,having used my last batch up!! I am trying to save at the moment so I am afraid I must resist for a while!! :( How does No 2 compare to No 1,I wonder? I like Rootham's first,but I must admit I was not convinced by some parts of it. The first movement seems like a series of climaxes without the truly memorable or motifs of a VW symphony (for example). It seems to find itself in the second movement. I must have another go! I am a big fan of the Moeran,though;and the Dyson seemingly grows on me,on each encounter. Not that I can hum that one;but such colourful,lush orchestration. I can't think of another British symphony like it,really!
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on July 11, 2015, 10:14:21 AM
I managed to grab the uploads of these works from the AMF before they were removed. I will be making some cdr-s of them as soon as I have some,having used my last batch up!! I am trying to save at the moment so I am afraid I must resist for a while!! :( How does No 2 compare to No 1,I wonder? I like Rootham's first,but I must admit I was not convinced by some parts of it. The first movement seems like a series of climaxes without the truly memorable or motifs of a VW symphony (for example). It seems to find itself in the second movement. I must have another go! I am a big fan of the Moeran,though;and the Dyson seemingly grows on me,on each encounter. Not that I can hum that one;but such colourful,lush orchestration. I can't think of another British symphony like it,really!
I will post on it as soon as I have heard it. I have a download of it which I liked although it is different to No.1. I also like that Dyson Symphony very much and find the end of 'Quo Vadis' to be incredibly moving.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Albion on July 11, 2015, 11:02:15 PM
Apart from some fleeting channel drop-out during the symphony this is about as good as it gets. In one release we have two of Rootham's most impressive and personal works.

In addition to the first symphony also on Lyrita, try to get hold of this splendid reissue, originally released in 1987 and subsequently as part of EMI's British Composers series:


(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2007/Dec07/rootham_5059232.jpg)


http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2008/Jan08/Rootham_5059232.htm (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2008/Jan08/Rootham_5059232.htm)

 :)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on July 12, 2015, 12:03:51 AM
Apart from some fleeting channel drop-out during the symphony this is about as good as it gets. In one release we have two of Rootham's most impressive and personal works.

In addition to the first symphony also on Lyrita, try to get hold of this splendid reissue, originally released in 1987 and subsequently as part of EMI's British Composers series:


(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2007/Dec07/rootham_5059232.jpg)


http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2008/Jan08/Rootham_5059232.htm (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2008/Jan08/Rootham_5059232.htm)

 :)

I agree that EMI CD is a fantastic disc. It was also the last new release I ever bought on LP in 1987.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on July 14, 2015, 12:24:04 AM
I've just bought the new Lyrita Rootham release via the Musicweb website. I just came upon the Musicweb Message Board and 'Dundonnell',amongst others was discussing the new release. The Boss of the site pointed out that the new cd set was available for £11.75 post free,via Musicweb and that was it!!! ??? ;D I must admit,I do feel one needs to support a release like this.Not that they're going to go down without me,of course....but as that gruesome dinosaur Tesco's slogan goes.......!!  I have now found all the Rootham downloads on my external drive. I've got the First symphony on there,and most,if not all,of the emi recordings;the cd of which is pretty pricey now!! As soon as I get some cdr's I will make a cdr,minus the Holbrooke and Bantock items;so I can concentrate on Rootham! I might miss the rather eye catching Lyrita artwork,with those birds!! Oh well.....I think I can cope! :( ;D
I saw your comments about the earlier Rootham cd on Amazon. I actually like some of Holbrooke's music......but I'm greedy,and I want ALL Holbrooke cds! 'The Birds of Rhiannon' is rather nice imho,but not one of his strongest works. I DO think,however,that it works allot  better coupled with orchestral works from his 'Cauldron of Annwn' cycle (as per,the not exactly brilliantly performed or recorded Marco Polo cd). A new cd of these works,including 'The Wild Fowl' would be a definite pre-order,here,and would display Holbrooke's darkly gothic,late romantic muse at it's best (Come on Chandos/Dutton/Cpo!!)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on July 14, 2015, 02:22:10 AM
I've just bought the new Lyrita Rootham release via the Musicweb website. I just came upon the Musicweb Message Board and 'Dundonnell',amongst others was discussing the new release. The Boss of the site pointed out that the new cd set was available for £11.75 post free,via Musicweb and that was it!!! ??? ;D I must admit,I do feel one needs to support a release like this.Not that they're going to go down without me,of course....but as that gruesome dinosaur Tesco's slogan goes.......!!  I have now found all the Rootham downloads on my external drive. I've got the First symphony on there,and most,if not all,of the emi recordings;the cd of which is pretty pricey now!! As soon as I get some cdr's I will make a cdr,minus the Holbrooke and Bantock items;so I can concentrate on Rootham! I might miss the rather eye catching Lyrita artwork,with those birds!! Oh well.....I think I can cope! :( ;D
I saw your comments about the earlier Rootham cd on Amazon. I actually like some of Holbrooke's music......but I'm greedy,and I want ALL Holbrooke cds! 'The Birds of Rhiannon' is rather nice imho,but not one of his strongest works. I DO think,however,that it works allot  better coupled with orchestral works from his 'Cauldron of Annwn' cycle (as per,the not exactly brilliantly performed or recorded Marco Polo cd). A new cd of these works,including 'The Wild Fowl' would be a definite pre-order,here,and would display Holbrooke's darkly gothic,late romantic muse at it's best (Come on Chandos/Dutton/Cpo!!)

Many thanks. I didn't realise that the new CD was actually a double album. I have just listened to Symphony 2 twice and found it wonderful. It is a more tranquil, quieter work than the bracing first symphony. However, Rootham's was progressively very ill and then dying when he wrote the Symphony 2. I have to say that I found the very end of the work, when it seems to enter some kind of ethereal/spiritual world, incredibly moving and teared-up as I was listening to it. By this time he couldn't speak or write and had only just enough time to dictate the last parts of the orchestration to his friend and former pupil Patrick Hadley (Rootham had conducted the premier of Hadley's wonderful 'The Trees so High' which is one of my favourite works). Anyway, on to 'Ode on the Morning of Christ's Nativity'!
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on July 14, 2015, 04:13:26 AM
By chance,I've just been listening to the Handley/Sainton 'twofer'! He sounds quite different to VW,doesn't he? I think Moeran is a closer comparison.....but without the Irish affinities/harmonies. I also like the Sainton pieces. 'The Island' is a glorious tone poem. Very film-ic. I always find it strangely sad. The flush & promise of youth.....yet,his subsequent career not living up to expectations. I like the other pieces too;and 'The Island' makes a nice curtain raiser before the melancholy of the Hadley work! It sets you up. A good pairing imho. Generally speaking I am a stickler for single composer cd's;with the exception of what Beecham used to refer to as 'lollipops';but this combi works!! :)
 I like 'The Hills' on emi.too!
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on July 14, 2015, 09:45:06 AM
By chance,I've just been listening to the Handley/Sainton 'twofer'! He sounds quite different to VW,doesn't he? I think Moeran is a closer comparison.....but without the Irish affinities/harmonies. I also like the Sainton pieces. 'The Island' is a glorious tone poem. Very film-ic. I always find it strangely sad. The flush & promise of youth.....yet,his subsequent career not living up to expectations. I like the other pieces too;and 'The Island' makes a nice curtain raiser before the melancholy of the Hadley work! It sets you up. A good pairing imho. Generally speaking I am a stickler for single composer cd's;with the exception of what Beecham used to refer to as 'lollipops';but this combi works!! :)
 I like 'The Hills' on emi.too!

That Chandos twofer is one of the best. I have that and the Lyrita version of The Trees so High. Sainton's 'Nadir' is terrific and movingly defiant in the way in hammers out 'V for Victory' at the end. I love works where despair turns into defiance and this is one of my favourites. Apparently it was a response to witnessing the death of a child in a bombing raid on Bristol during the war. Do you know Sainton's score for the film 'Moby Dick' on Marco Polo? As you like the fine tone poem 'The Island' you should like that work too as it is very evocative sea music.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on July 17, 2015, 02:40:31 PM
Thank you, Lyrita!

This Lyrita release is a real joy to me.  I want to contribute a fragment of the programme note written by my father (Jasper Rootham, CBR's son) for the performance of "Ode on the Morning of Christ's Nativity" on 28 November 1962 in King's College Chapel, Cambridge, conducted by David Willcocks:

  "This work was composed between 1925 and 1928, though the composer had it in mind for some time before that. The combination of Christian belief, classical form and avid acceptance of beauty in any shape, which the young Milton put into the Nativity Ode, faced Rootham with a stiff technical problem of contriving a musical structure which would suit, and perhaps even adorn this profusion. [...]  Rootham used to think that this was his best work, although he never lived to hear his own Second Symphony, written in the shadow of death, performed. At any rate, in the Nativity Ode Rootham had scope for what he liked best and was probably best at, namely the setting of words to music, whether for soloists or for chorus."

If anyone would like a PDF of the full programme notes for that entire 1962 concert, just email me through the rootham.org website.

And let's not get get too hung up about CBR being "near death" while finishing the 2nd Symphony. Just read Patrick Hadley's sparkling obituary / tribute here:
  http://rootham.org/obituary.html

Happily,
Dan Rootham
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on July 17, 2015, 09:14:38 PM
Thank you, Lyrita!

This Lyrita release is a real joy to me.  I want to contribute a fragment of the programme note written by my father (Jasper Rootham, CBR's son) for the performance of "Ode on the Morning of Christ's Nativity" on 28 November 1962 in King's College Chapel, Cambridge, conducted by David Willcocks:

  "This work was composed between 1925 and 1928, though the composer had it in mind for some time before that. The combination of Christian belief, classical form and avid acceptance of beauty in any shape, which the young Milton put into the Nativity Ode, faced Rootham with a stiff technical problem of contriving a musical structure which would suit, and perhaps even adorn this profusion. [...]  Rootham used to think that this was his best work, although he never lived to hear his own Second Symphony, written in the shadow of death, performed. At any rate, in the Nativity Ode Rootham had scope for what he liked best and was probably best at, namely the setting of words to music, whether for soloists or for chorus."

If anyone would like a PDF of the full programme notes for that entire 1962 concert, just email me through the rootham.org website.

And let's not get get too hung up about CBR being "near death" while finishing the 2nd Symphony. Just read Patrick Hadley's sparkling obituary / tribute here:
  http://rootham.org/obituary.html

Happily,
Dan Rootham

Dan, I take the point in your last sentence and many thanks for posting the fine tribute by Patrick Hadley (another great composer). I was really interested to know that your grandfather conducted the first performance of 'The Trees so High' and the first British performance of Honegger's 'King David'. I am now really enjoying the 'Ode on the Morning of Christ's Nativity'. I am very pleased that we have Rootham's grandson contributing to this thread. Jeffrey.  :)

Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on July 25, 2015, 02:10:06 AM
Good to know he kept his sense of humour! Thank you for your contribution to this thread,Daniel.
I'm looking forward to the new Lyrita cd,which I ordered from Musicweb last week. Unfortunately,no sign of it yet :(. I was told it had been posted. I shall wait a few more days then email the sender!
That said,I have the downloads of the broadcast,and I might just make some cd-rs. The trouble is,the cd will probably turn up as soon as I've made them! Okay! Can't wait! I'll do a cd-r of No's 1 & 2 (will they fit on one?!! ::)).
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on July 25, 2015, 04:09:54 AM
Yes,they fit! :) Of course,I should point out,in the circumstances;the Lyrita recording was a paid download & I am awaiting the Lyrita 2cd set. I do believe in supporting the original artists when possible. In between,off air recordings are the only way! Whoever uploaded the recording of the Second Symphony,to the AMF,obviously had a good tape recorder! Wonderful,glorious music.....I'm really enjoying this. I also have the dowload of the emi cd,minus 'The Psalm of Adonis'. Amazon,craftily,make you download the entire cd if you want that. I recall downloading a few tracks,then ending up buying the remainder. The trouble is I'd to pay again to download that short piece!! The emi cd is very pricey s/h at the moment! ???
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Albion on July 27, 2015, 06:52:46 AM
An excellent site with a useful work-list and some great images of CBR -

http://rootham.org/index.html (http://rootham.org/index.html)

 :)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on July 27, 2015, 07:24:31 AM
Still waiting for the Lyrita Rootham 2cd set! :( Maybe tomorrow?!!
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on July 28, 2015, 12:43:00 AM
Still waiting for the Lyrita Rootham 2cd set! :( Maybe tomorrow?!!

Well, 'City in the West' should be with you at least.  8)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Albion on July 28, 2015, 07:34:39 AM
Reviewed very positively on musicweb -

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2015/Jul/Rootham_sy2_REAM2118.htm (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2015/Jul/Rootham_sy2_REAM2118.htm)

 ;D
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on July 29, 2015, 03:11:09 AM
Indded! It would be nice if my order from Musicweb would arrive!! :( :(
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on July 30, 2015, 03:55:38 AM
Indded! It would be nice if my order from Musicweb would arrive!! :( :(

What about the EMI disc?  8)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on July 30, 2015, 04:02:01 AM
Reviewed very positively on musicweb -

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2015/Jul/Rootham_sy2_REAM2118.htm (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2015/Jul/Rootham_sy2_REAM2118.htm)

 ;D
It's a great review. Thanks so much for posting it.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on July 30, 2015, 06:48:07 AM
Well,You certainly beat Musicweb! I'm still waiting and contacted them today. No reply,as yet. Perhaps someone is playing it now? Or thinking,what's this new indie band?!! ??? :( >:(
City in the West is a lovely,evocative piece. I think it is one of Rootham's finest.Thank you for enabling me to hear this without paying for the full download. You have to be careful about being tempted in this way. I've had the emi pieces (you could download separately) on my external drive for a while. Since then I've learnt to watch out for these kind of traps!! ::)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on July 30, 2015, 07:08:47 AM
Well,You certainly beat Musicweb! I'm still waiting and contacted them today. No reply,as yet. Perhaps someone is playing it now? Or thinking,what's this new indie band?!! ??? :( >:(
City in the West is a lovely,evocative piece. I think it is one of Rootham's finest.Thank you for enabling me to hear this without paying for the full download. You have to be careful about being tempted in this way. I've had the emi pieces (you could download separately) on my external drive for a while. Since then I've learnt to watch out for these kind of traps!! ::)
My pleasure and glad that you are enjoying it.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on January 11, 2017, 08:53:59 AM
No Armstrong Gibbs thread as far as I can make out. I did look. Perhaps I missed it?! If there is one I apologise and I could move this?! Anyway,I listened to his third Symphony a few days ago,knowing that vandermolen enjoys it. What a surprise! A really lovely symphony! :) I enjoyed every moment of it. Quite a find imho,if you like symphonies along the lines of Rootham and other British composers of that period. In fact,there was not one moment of it that I didn't enjoy!!  With respect to the performance,it is definitely one of Marco Polo's better efforts.  I would certainly place this amongst the best of the less well known symphonies (I'd like to avoid ranking here!) of this period. Rootham admirers might enjoy this?!

(http://i1362.photobucket.com/albums/r688/dinasman/51oKTZdALzL_zpsx9heafox.jpg)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on January 11, 2017, 12:49:34 PM
No Armstrong Gibbs thread as far as I can make out. I did look. Perhaps I missed it?! If there is one I aplogise and I could move this?! Anyway,I listened to his third Symphony a few days ago,knowing that vandermolen enjoys it. What a surprise! A really lovely symphony! :) I enjoyed every moment of it. Quite a find imho,if you like symphonies along the lines of Rootham and other British composers of that period. In fact,there was not one moment of it that I didn't enjoy!!  With respect to the performance,it is definitely one of Marco Polo's better efforts.  I would certainly place this amongst the best of the less well known symphonies (I'd like to avoid ranking here!) of this period. Rootham admirers might enjoy this?!

(http://i1362.photobucket.com/albums/r688/dinasman/51oKTZdALzL_zpsx9heafox.jpg)
Totally agree with you. It is in memory of his son killed in the war I think - very moving and poignant. I'm pleased that you like it too.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Christo on January 11, 2017, 01:09:35 PM
Totally agree with you. It is in memory of his son killed in the war I think - very moving and poignant. I'm pleased that you like it too.
... and another vote here who totally agrees with both of you. 'Westmorland' is a poignant, moving symphony, as sincere as music can be.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on January 11, 2017, 01:16:30 PM
... and another vote here who totally agrees with both of you. 'Westmorland' is a poignant, moving symphony, as sincere as music can be.
I had a feeling that Armstrong Gibbs would hook you into the discussion  8)
We'll get on to Eugene Goossens in a minute  :)
Yes the Armstrong Gibbs is a fine work and makes reference to locations I knew well as a student in the North of England although they are not all spelt properly on the CD 'Castnel Fell' should be Cartmel Fell. It's a beautiful area.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on January 11, 2017, 01:20:06 PM
... and another vote here who totally agrees with both of you. 'Westmorland' is a poignant, moving symphony, as sincere as music can be.
Do you know Edgar Bainton Symphony 3 Johan? His wife died whilst he was composing it and he stopped composing. A friend challenged him to complete it and the result IMHO is as poignant and moving as the Armstrong Gibbs score.

Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on January 13, 2017, 11:35:01 AM
I must admit I haven't made much headway with Bainton's third;try as I might. But then you haven't much headway with Respighi's Sinfonia Drammatica!! ??? ;D  Although,as I found out very recently on the Respighi thread,it has got some fans!! That said,I'm sure Bainton's third is infintely more subtle!! ;D More fool me,eh?!! ;D  I must admit I do prefer his Second. I find the themes a bit diffuse in the third. I just can't get a grip on any real structure. The second,however has a memorable theme which reappears at intervals (it's a while since I heard it). It's very Baxian in atmosphere,but has a 'flavour' of it's own. Lovely! :)

I do also have a problem with the choice of coupling by Dutton. Boughton's First! Why not more Bainton? I must admit I dislike Dutton's 'habit' of coupling two  different composers,if it's anyone other than Arnell or Havergal Brian!!  I just find it annoying! I like to concentrate on one specific composer at a time;but there we are;maybe that's just me? Although,I know that at least one critic on Musicweb expressed the same view of Dutton's coupling tendencies. Of course,you can make a cd-r with just one composer;but I don't really want to do that if I can help it!!
More importantly,I suppose,is the fact that Boughton's first symphony is dull.........and I'm someone who likes Boughton. In fact,I think he deserves a bit better than he gets. I like his second and third symphonies. They are fine pieces of music. I think the second is absolutely lovely. I like all the music on the Hyperion cd;which includes his Flute Concerto and Concerto for String Orchestra. Finely crafted music,all of it! I love his Bethehem (also on Hyperion) and I like his unexpectedly more astringent,The Queen of Cornwall,even more than his Immortal Hour. But his First Symphony,NO!!! I appreciate that it's an early work,but imho I do think coupling it with the Bainton was a ghastly mistake.  The couplings for the Second are much better,and they do work quite well together.

On the other hand,sometimes a coupling of two different composers does work very well! The BBC Radio Classics cd of Bantock's Pagan Symphony,in a very satisfying and different performance by the late lamented Edward Downes is a case in point. I think the juxtaposition of the Bantock and Bax's Tintagel and Northern Ballads is very apt. The legendary atmosphere of the music by both composers chosen here, just makes this a perfect disc for me. Which is  more than I can say for Hyperion's choice of (or Handley's?) Fifine at the blasted Fair!! Not a favourite I'm afraid. For some reason,if I have to listen to it Beecham's performance is my preference,anyway,even if it's cut and in mono!! It just has more poetry! In fact,I even quite like parts of it his performance. That said,it's still not a favourite. For years this would have been the only accessible Bantock available. When I put the Lp on I would wonder what the rest of his music was like. The fact that it was the only Bantock I could hear meant it actually got more plays than it would have had otherwise. I never actually thought I would ever hear anything else by this composer!! The old emi recording makes me a bit sad though;because Beecham did,apparently,express a desire to record more of these neglected composers. I think Holbrooke may have been another one? Alas,it never happened. A Beecham recording of the Hebridean,Celtic Symphony or Pagan would have been truly special! And maybe a Beecham,Ulalume?! This (and Bantock's neglect at the time of the recording,and my own youth) gives the Beecham recording a certain poignancy which possibly helps to make Fifine a little more appealing than it would,or should be!! I actually do play it now and again as it is in that emi box set of English composers. On the final cd,if memory serves me correctly?!!

Anyway,I digress!! ::)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on January 14, 2017, 01:08:53 PM
I must admit I haven't made much headway with Bainton's third;try as I might. But then you haven't much headway with Respighi's Sinfonia Drammatica!! ??? ;D  Although,as I found out very recently on the Respighi thread,it has got some fans!! That said,I'm sure Bainton's third is infintely more subtle!! ;D More fool me,eh?!! ;D  I must admit I do prefer his Second. I find the themes a bit diffuse in the third. I just can't get a grip on any real structure. The second,however has a memorable theme which reappears at intervals (it's a while since I heard it). It's very Baxian in atmosphere,but has a 'flavour' of it's own. Lovely! :)

I do also have a problem with the choice of coupling by Dutton. Boughton's First! Why not more Bainton? I must admit I dislike Dutton's 'habit' of coupling two  different composers,if it's anyone other than Arnell or Havergal Brian!!  I just find it annoying! I like to concentrate on one specific composer at a time;but there we are;maybe that's just me? Although,I know that at least one critic on Musicweb expressed the same view of Dutton's coupling tendencies. Of course,you can make a cd-r with just one composer;but I don't really want to do that if I can help it!!
More importantly,I suppose,is the fact that Boughton's first symphony is dull.........and I'm someone who likes Boughton. In fact,I think he deserves a bit better than he gets. I like his second and third symphonies. They are fine pieces of music. I think the second is absolutely lovely. I like all the music on the Hyperion cd;which includes his Flute Concerto and Concerto for String Orchestra. Finely crafted music,all of it! I love his Bethehem (also on Hyperion) and I like his unexpectedly more astringent,The Queen of Cornwall,even more than his Immortal Hour. But his First Symphony,NO!!! I appreciate that it's an early work,but imho I do think coupling it with the Bainton was a ghastly mistake.  The couplings for the Second are much better,and they do work quite well together.

On the other hand,sometimes a coupling of two different composers does work very well! The BBC Radio Classics cd of Bantock's Pagan Symphony,in a very satisfying and different performance by the late lamented Edward Downes is a case in point. I think the juxtaposition of the Bantock and Bax's Tintagel and Northern Ballads is very apt. The legendary atmosphere of the music by both composers chosen here, just makes this a perfect disc for me. Which is  more than I can say for Hyperion's choice of (or Handley's?) Fifine at the blasted Fair!! Not a favourite I'm afraid. For some reason,if I have to listen to it Beecham's performance is my preference,anyway,even if it's cut and in mono!! It just has more poetry! In fact,I even quite like parts of it his performance. That said,it's still not a favourite. For years this would have been the only accessible Bantock available. When I put the Lp on I would wonder what the rest of his music was like. The fact that it was the only Bantock I could hear meant it actually got more plays than it would have had otherwise. I never actually thought I would ever hear anything else by this composer!! The old emi recording makes me a bit sad though;because Beecham did,apparently,express a desire to record more of these neglected composers. I think Holbrooke may have been another one? Alas,it never happened. A Beecham recording of the Hebridean,Celtic Symphony or Pagan would have been truly special! And maybe a Beecham,Ulalume?! This (and Bantock's neglect at the time of the recording,and my own youth) gives the Beecham recording a certain poignancy which possibly helps to make Fifine a little more appealing than it would,or should be!! I actually do play it now and again as it is in that emi box set of English composers. On the final cd,if memory serves me correctly?!!

Anyway,I digress!! ::)
Your post, as always, is very interesting and, rather boringly perhaps, I agree with everything in it! The 'Cromwell Symphony' by Boughton is a most dreary affair. The Clifford 'Symphony 1940' coupled with Bainton's Second Symphony on Chandos is much better, a fine and moving work - a kind of wartime act of defiance and a shaking of the fist at 'would be oppressors' as the booklet notes point out - it was written during the Blitz on London (Arnell's mother was killed in the Blitz - I say apropos of nothing!) Fifine at the Fair has such a stupidly twee title that it undermines my enjoyment of the work - although there are some beautiful passages. Going back to Boughton I have the highest opinion of The Immortal Hour and the Oboe Concerto, coupled with Symphony 3 on Hyperion I think. My latest discovery is R.Nathaniel Dett's 'The Ordering of Moses' - a fine work from 1937 but I will get back to Respighi's 'Sinfonia Drammatica'.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on January 17, 2017, 10:56:33 AM
I've been listening to the Bainton third again. The fact that I often use cordless headphones hasn't helped. There you are listening in another room and the Boughton comes on! ??? As I said,ingrate as I am  ;D,I do prefer one composer at a time;unless it's one of those old style collections of overtures or ballet music,like you used to get on Lp's. I think Bainton and Veale are quite good enough to stand on their own. At least the Gardner symphony is a decent one;although I still skip to the Veale now! The Clifford is a good one;and the Bainton Second and Clifford seem to go very well together.  Lyrita's decision to couple Brian with Cooke led to my sticking to buying dowloads of 6 & 16. I would have been quite happy with a cd of just the Brian symphonies,myself. I'm not really that keen on what I've heard of Cooke;but I think it is a decent symphony of it's sort,unlike the Boughton!! Anyway,I'm using the program button to isolate the Bainton third from it's annoying neighbour and you'll be pleased to hear that I'm starting to enjoy it now. It's obviously a more complex work than it's predecessor,so it needs more of a listen. Another observation. While on first appearances the main composer comparison that springs to mind is Bax;a good deal of it sounds closer to the sound world of Moeran.  Maybe a sort of fusion of the two;but with a flavour of it's own. The big climaxes certainly make a most glorious sound. A bit like the ones you have in the first movement of Bax's Second symphony. You feel the full power of the orchestra roaring at you. Very exciting!
I think I'll play it again now. Again,using the program button. I can understand why the Rutland Boughton trust wanted to record it,but phew!! ::)

After bashing Boughton's First,I must say I was genuinely disappointed to read in the most recent Rutland Boughton trust Newsletter (available via their website) that funding for new Boughton recordings has virtually dried up. Meanwhile the Faust Fund on the HB website races past the 90% marker!! ??? And there I was hoping I might live to hear one of his Arthurian Music-Dramas!! ;D  As to Nathaniel Dett? I would look him up,but I fear I'll be dipping into my account again! Guess what one of my New Year resolutions is? (was?! ::)).

Just realised I'm droning on about Bainton on a Rootham thread. I may try and move this post. Apologies for this! :-[




Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: cilgwyn on January 17, 2017, 11:05:16 AM
I listened to Rootham's Second symphony again last night. I'm going to have another listen later;and to Gibb's third,along the way......or after? Wonderful symphonies. They go well together. I think Rootham's Second and Gibb's third are quite a find.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Christo on January 24, 2017, 01:52:49 AM
[quote/] author=vandermolen link=topic=4930.msg1032182#msg1032182 date=1484169606]Do you know Edgar Bainton Symphony 3 Johan? His wife died whilst he was composing it and he stopped composing. A friend challenged him to complete it and the result IMHO is as poignant and moving as the Armstrong Gibbs score.

[/quote]
I kept silent, because I bought it immediately - but am not sure if I ever played it. Hundreds of other CDs fared the same, I'm (not) afraid to say.  :-X

Okay, 'as poignant and moving as Gibbs' is enough recommendation. Will oblige.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on January 24, 2017, 02:29:41 AM
I kept silent, because I bought it immediately - but am not sure if I ever played it. Hundreds of other CDs fared the same, I'm (not) afraid to say.  :-X

Okay, 'as poignant and moving as Gibbs' is enough recommendation. Will oblige.
Yes, certainly you need to hear this Johan - we shall expect a full résumé in due course.  8)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Oates on February 03, 2017, 03:17:57 AM
Apart from some fleeting channel drop-out during the symphony this is about as good as it gets. In one release we have two of Rootham's most impressive and personal works.

In addition to the first symphony also on Lyrita, try to get hold of this splendid reissue, originally released in 1987 and subsequently as part of EMI's British Composers series:


(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2007/Dec07/rootham_5059232.jpg)


http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2008/Jan08/Rootham_5059232.htm (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2008/Jan08/Rootham_5059232.htm)

 :)

Yes, this CD is very worthwhile. I wish Hickox could have returned to Rootham as part of his tenure at Chandos. Incidentally, the cover art of this EMI CD has always intrigued me. It is meant to reflect the spirit of the piece For The Fallen, which uses Binyon's The Spirit of England as its text. Binyon's intention (if not Rootham's) was to commemorate British war loses. The CD photo was taken at Douaumont Cemetery at Verdun, and exclusively  depicts the resting place of French and German troops.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on February 03, 2017, 07:30:45 AM
Yes, this CD is very worthwhile. I wish Hickox could have returned to Rootham as part of his tenure at Chandos. Incidentally, the cover art of this EMI CD has always intrigued me. It is meant to reflect the spirit of the piece For The Fallen, which uses Binyon's The Spirit of England as its text. Binyon's intention (if not Rootham's) was to commemorate British war loses. The CD photo was taken at Douaumont Cemetery at Verdun, and exclusively  depicts the resting place of French and German troops.
Interesting point. This, in its original appearance, was one of the last new LPs I bought in 1987.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on February 11, 2017, 11:21:51 AM
Sorry to have been absent from the forum for so long - but I retire in less than three weeks and will have much more time for Cyril Rootham and the website...

Re the "For the Fallen" CD recorded by Hickox, I can tell you that the typesetting status of the included works is now as follows:
- op 38 "The Stolen Child": typeset and proofread
- op 61 "Miniature Suite": typeset and proofread, and to be performed in September 2017 by Taunton Sinfonietta
- op 93 "City in the West": typeset and proofread
- op 84 "The Psalm of Adonis": currently being typeset
- op 51 "For the Fallen": published and available from Chiltern Music

Another upcoming performance: Cyril Rootham's op 89 "March for Military Band" (1933). It will be performed by the London Military Band, in the Wilde Theatre at South Hill Park Arts Centre, Bracknell on Sunday 19th March at 3pm. Alistair Jones, who typeset the work, will conduct this work only: the rest of the programme is conducted by Alan Shellard.

And finally: a few completely unknown Rootham songs are now available to play from the Rootham website. We are using the MuseScore typesetting software to generate a synthesised performance "on demand": sorry if this upsets purists who would prefer a human performance!  So far, you can hear op 1 "Four Songs" (1895), op 11 "It was an English Ladye bright" (1904) and op 19 "The Ballad of Kingslea Mere" (1905).  There's also the first movement of CBR's op 88 "Suite for Pianoforte" (1933): the other three movements will follow when proofread. All these works have a player icon on the Works page of the Rootham website:
http://rootham.org/works.html (http://rootham.org/works.html)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on February 12, 2017, 03:28:25 AM
Sorry to have been absent from the forum for so long - but I retire in less than three weeks and will have much more time for Cyril Rootham and the website...

Re the "For the Fallen" CD recorded by Hickox, I can tell you that the typesetting status of the included works is now as follows:
- op 38 "The Stolen Child": typeset and proofread
- op 61 "Miniature Suite": typeset and proofread, and to be performed in September 2017 by Taunton Sinfonietta
- op 93 "City in the West": typeset and proofread
- op 84 "The Psalm of Adonis": currently being typeset
- op 51 "For the Fallen": published and available from Chiltern Music

Another upcoming performance: Cyril Rootham's op 89 "March for Military Band" (1933). It will be performed by the London Military Band, in the Wilde Theatre at South Hill Park Arts Centre, Bracknell on Sunday 19th March at 3pm. Alistair Jones, who typeset the work, will conduct this work only: the rest of the programme is conducted by Alan Shellard.

And finally: a few completely unknown Rootham songs are now available to play from the Rootham website. We are using the MuseScore typesetting software to generate a synthesised performance "on demand": sorry if this upsets purists who would prefer a human performance!  So far, you can hear op 1 "Four Songs" (1895), op 11 "It was an English Ladye bright" (1904) and op 19 "The Ballad of Kingslea Mere" (1905).  There's also the first movement of CBR's op 88 "Suite for Pianoforte" (1933): the other three movements will follow when proofread. All these works have a player icon on the Works page of the Rootham website:
http://rootham.org/works.html (http://rootham.org/works.html)
Thanks for the information Daniel and good to hear from you on the forum again. Coincidentally, yesterday I listened to your grandfather's eloquent and very moving Second Symphony. I hope that the Lyrita CD gets the exposure it deserves and I was delighted to see the underrated and inspiriting Symphony 1 reissued as part of the Lyrita boxed set of British symphonies:

Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Scion7 on February 12, 2017, 11:33:02 AM
While this chap is mostly regarded for his vocal music,  the total neglect of his chamber music in this day and age of releasing/recording-releasing just about anything under the sun is a bit bewildering:

String Quintet in D   (1908)
String Quartet in C   (1914)
Suite for Flute & Piano  (1921)
Sonata in g for violinn & piano  (1925)
Septet for Viola, wind quintet & Harp  (1930)
Piano Trio  (1931)

 >:(

an exception:

(http://s15.postimg.org/ov9oczzzf/violin_Son.jpg)


Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Mirror Image on February 12, 2017, 11:50:35 AM
Went on a little Rootham shopping spree:

Also bought:

(https://www.chandos.net/artwork/LY0269.jpg) (https://www.chandos.net/artwork/LE2118.jpg)

(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61LGntwz26L._SS500.jpg)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on February 12, 2017, 04:58:15 PM
Went on a little Rootham shopping spree:
Three wonderful discs - you won't be disappointed John. If you like Bliss, which you do ( :)) you should like Rootham's First Symphony. Rootham was the teacher of Bliss and his first symphony shares something of the open-air quality and great slapping brass passages of Bliss's 'A Colour Symphony' they are both very genial works but not without depth. The Rootham Symphony 1 has a fine tune which suddenly appears like that at the end of Vaughan Williams's 6th Symphony first movement - in the Rootham it's in the final movement. The Second Symphony is something quite different. Written when he was very ill at the end of his life. I find the final minutes, with a choral accompaniment, to be heart breakingly beautiful. The other disc is wonderful too - one of the last new LPs I bought in 1987.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Mirror Image on February 12, 2017, 05:02:09 PM
Three wonderful discs - you won't be disappointed John. If you like Bliss, which you do ( :)) you should like Rootham's First Symphony. Rootham was the teacher of Bliss and his first symphony shares something of the open-air quality and great slapping brass passages of Bliss's 'A Colour Symphony' they are both very genial works but not without depth. The Rootham Symphony 1 has a fine tune which suddenly appears like that at the end of Vaughan Williams's 6th Symphony first movement - in the Rootham it's in the final movement. The Second Symphony is something quite different. Written when he was very ill at the end of his life. I find the final minutes, with a choral accompaniment, to be heart breakingly beautiful. The other disc is wonderful too - one of the last new LPs I bought in 1987.

Great to hear, Jeffrey. I already listened to Symphony No. 1 earlier and found it quite enjoyable indeed. Looking forward to hearing the rest! :)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on February 16, 2017, 06:34:21 AM
While this chap is mostly regarded for his vocal music,  the total neglect of his chamber music in this day and age of releasing/recording-releasing just about anything under the sun is a bit bewildering:

String Quintet in D   (1908)
String Quartet in C   (1914)
Suite for Flute & Piano  (1921)
Sonata in G for violin & piano  (1925)
Septet for Viola, wind quintet & Harp  (1930)
Piano Trio  (1931)

an exception:
Violin Sonata in G minor

I agree with you.  Over the past few years and with help from friends, I have arranged the typesetting of several of Rootham's chamber works. These works are now typeset, and most have been proofread:

Furthermore I am planning a recording of these "strings only" works within the next few months:

The op 27 Quintet in particular is a beautiful composition.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Christo on February 17, 2017, 01:26:58 AM
Great to hear, Jeffrey. I already listened to Symphony No. 1 earlier and found it quite enjoyable indeed. Looking forward to hearing the rest! :)

One of my very rare and very minor differences of opinion with Jeffrey - we're musical twins  8) - concerns this Rootham 1: I like it, but apparently somewhat less so than he.  :) Hope to find out soon if I like the Second better (guess so, from what I read about it).
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on February 17, 2017, 02:27:13 AM
One of my very rare and very minor differences of opinion with Jeffrey - we're musical twins  8) - concerns this Rootham 1: I like it, but apparently somewhat less so than he.  :) Hope to find out soon if I like the Second better (guess so, from what I read about it).
I forgive you. 8)
Yes, look forward to hearing what you make of Symphony 2 - a completely different type of work with a wonderful closing section.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on March 07, 2017, 10:59:01 AM
On the topic of Cyril Rootham's two symphonies, I shall be giving a talk about my grandfather's music at the Daventry weekend meeting (21-23 April) of the Federation of Recorded Music Societies.  The talk will include a historic 78 excerpt from each symphony, as well as selections from several more recent recordings of CBR's part-songs and choral works. 

Sorry, the talk is rather bright and early on the morning of Saturday 22 April: 09:30-10:45 at the Mercure Daventry Court Hotel.  Day tickets are available, and full details about the weekend will be posted on the FRMS website:  http://www.thefrms.co.uk/frmsevents/frmsevents.htm (http://www.thefrms.co.uk/frmsevents/frmsevents.htm)

Dan
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on March 13, 2017, 12:38:39 AM
More information about Cyril Rootham's chamber music...

A recording of three CBR works (Op.20 and Op.49 quartets, Op.27 quintet) will go ahead in April.

And there is now a generated MP3 of CBR's Op.12 "Réminiscences des Alpes Bavaroises" (1906). The work is for violin and piano, and thanks to MuseScore's technology you can listen while following the score:
  Op.12 Réminiscences MP3 (https://musescore.com/danielr/reminiscences/s/2ee053/embed)

This charming piece lasts about 11 minutes and is dedicated "à son ami H. Haydn Inwards" - one of the violinists of the Gompertz Quartet. One puzzle: is the work's title a pure coinicidence, or is it intended as quiet homage to Elgar's 1895 songs (Op.27 "From the Bavarian Highlands")?
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on March 13, 2017, 02:52:37 AM
More information about Cyril Rootham's chamber music...

A recording of three CBR works (Op.20 and Op.49 quartets, Op.27 quintet) will go ahead in April.

And there is now a generated MP3 of CBR's Op.12 "Réminiscences des Alpes Bavaroises" (1906). The work is for violin and piano, and thanks to MuseScore's technology you can listen while following the score:
  Op.12 Réminiscences MP3 (https://musescore.com/danielr/reminiscences/s/2ee053/embed)

This charming piece lasts about 11 minutes and is dedicated "à son ami H. Haydn Inwards" - one of the violinists of the Gompertz Quartet. One puzzle: is the work's title a pure coinicidence, or is it intended as quiet homage to Elgar's 1895 songs (Op.27 "From the Bavarian Highlands")?
That's exciting news Daniel and very glad to hear it. I don't think I'll be able to get to Daventry for your talk about your grandfather's music but I hope it goes well and that you get a good sized audience. I'm very interested to hear about the 78rpm extracts from the symphonies.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on March 23, 2017, 05:44:28 AM
About CBR's symphonies: those extracts from 78s are embedded in the 100th anniversary talk given on Radio 3 by the late Arthur Hutchings, and you can hear the talk on the Rootham website here:
http://rootham.org/playlist/hutchings/listen_hutchings_talk.html (http://rootham.org/playlist/hutchings/listen_hutchings_talk.html)

Two new events to mention...

On 19th March 2017, the London Military Band's concert included CBR's Op.89 "March for Military Band". The full story and the recording (with score) are now on the website:
http://rootham.org/playlist/opus_089/listen_opus089_perf_score.html (http://rootham.org/playlist/opus_089/listen_opus089_perf_score.html)

And over the past few days I have created a generated MP3 file with score for two of CBR's anthems from 1911:
Until I can get someone to record these works, a synthetic version is perhaps better than nothing? Just look for the player icon against each work on the website's "Works" page here:
http://rootham.org/works.html (http://rootham.org/works.html)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on June 23, 2017, 12:43:34 AM
The Cyril Rootham project continues...

I am happy to tell you that part of our recording session in April 2017 is now available on YouTube - the first recording of Rootham's Op.20 "Capriccio for String Quartet in D minor": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3eMP96C-Fvg (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3eMP96C-Fvg)

My thanks to the Crystal Palace String Quartet for this beautiful performance, and to project manager James Hall and recording engineer Joe Olney for their part on the technical aspects.

I am working hard towards getting this Op.20 published...
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on June 23, 2017, 09:30:49 AM
The Cyril Rootham project continues...

I am happy to tell you that part of our recording session in April 2017 is now available on YouTube - the first recording of Rootham's Op.20 "Capriccio for String Quartet in D minor": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3eMP96C-Fvg (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3eMP96C-Fvg)

My thanks to the Crystal Palace String Quartet for this beautiful performance, and to project manager James Hall and recording engineer Joe Olney for their part on the technical aspects.

I am working hard towards getting this Op.20 published...
Great news Daniel! Thanks for letting us know.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on July 03, 2017, 11:35:50 PM
More news about Cyril Rootham's chamber music...

I have just uploaded to YouTube the first recording of Rootham's String Quintet in D major (Op.27), performed on 11 April 2017 by the augmented London City Quartet:
https://youtu.be/UxukpAxWErs (https://youtu.be/UxukpAxWErs)

It's not a lightweight piece: duration over 31 minutes....

I was recently given access to an amusing extract from the diaries of Thomas Dunhill (my thanks to Paul Vincent):
Quote
July 1909
... to an "At Home" at Dr Champney’s. R.C.M. Union affair. They did a dull quintet by Rootham ...

Perhaps the length of the quintet triggered that remark?  In the interests of historical completeness, I felt bound to share it!
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on July 04, 2017, 12:15:24 AM
More news about Cyril Rootham's chamber music...

I have just uploaded to YouTube the first recording of Rootham's String Quintet in D major (Op.27), performed on 11 April 2017 by the augmented London City Quartet:
https://youtu.be/UxukpAxWErs (https://youtu.be/UxukpAxWErs)

It's not a lightweight piece: duration over 31 minutes....

I was recently given access to an amusing extract from the diaries of Thomas Dunhill (my thanks to Paul Vincent):
Perhaps the length of the quintet triggered that remark?  In the interests of historical completeness, I felt bound to share it!
It is a very lyrical and enjoyable work - not dull at all. Maybe Dunhill was referring to his own music!  :)
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on December 09, 2017, 12:17:19 PM
Another lost work retrieved: I have just finished typesetting Cyril Rootham's Op.10 String Quartet in G minor from a scan of the original manuscript in the Cambridge University Library.  Most poignantly, this work from 1902 is dedicated to Cyril Rootham's father - my great-grandfather and namesake Daniel Rootham (1837-1922), who was musical director of the Bristol Madrigal Society for 50 years.

There's no performance recording of this quartet yet, but you can follow the score with a synthesized sound track generated by MuseScore.  This link should take you to the Op.10 Quartet entry on the Works page on the CBR website:  http://rootham.org/works.html#op010 (http://rootham.org/works.html#op010)

The quartet runs to about 21 minutes and consists of four movements:

Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on December 10, 2017, 02:52:14 AM
Another lost work retrieved: I have just finished typesetting Cyril Rootham's Op.10 String Quartet in G minor from a scan of the original manuscript in the Cambridge University Library.  Most poignantly, this work from 1902 is dedicated to Cyril Rootham's father - my great-grandfather and namesake Daniel Rootham (1837-1922), who was musical director of the Bristol Madrigal Society for 50 years.

There's no performance recording of this quartet yet, but you can follow the score with a synthesized sound track generated by MuseScore.  This link should take you to the Op.10 Quartet entry on the Works page on the CBR website:  http://rootham.org/works.html#op010 (http://rootham.org/works.html#op010)

The quartet runs to about 21 minutes and consists of four movements:
  • Allegro moderato
  • Adagio (starts at 7'20")
  • Allegro giocoso e marcato (starts at 12'05")
  • Allegro non troppo e misterioso (starts at 15'45")

Very interesting news Daniel - any chance of new recordings of CR's music?

Incidentally I used your grandfather's image (complete with pipe) as one of my questions on our 'Guess the composer' quiz; it didn't take long for someone to reveal his identity!
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on December 10, 2017, 05:00:18 AM
"... any chance of new recordings of CR's music?"

Yes, there is a CD of music for flute and piano planned for Spring 2018 by flautist James Dutton and pianist Oliver Davies.  I heard part of the content at a concert in The Guards' Chapel on 31st October (http://rootham.org/downloads/Guards_Chapel_Concert_2017-10-31.pdf (http://rootham.org/downloads/Guards_Chapel_Concert_2017-10-31.pdf)), and that was a great experience. I especially enjoyed the CBR Op.64 "Suite in Three Movements" (of course) - but also the "Sonata for Flute & Piano" by Stanley Bate.

More details about this CD on James Dutton's website: https://www.jamesduttonflute.com/recording/ (https://www.jamesduttonflute.com/recording/)

"...  I used your grandfather's image (complete with pipe) as one of my questions on our 'Guess the composer' quiz..."

Thank you for promoting CBR in a music quiz!  That photo with pipe was almost certainly taken by my father Jasper when he and CBR were on a walking holiday.  Probably the last vigorous outdoor excursion they had together before CBR suffered a stroke in 1936...
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on December 10, 2017, 06:30:20 AM
"... any chance of new recordings of CR's music?"

Yes, there is a CD of music for flute and piano planned for Spring 2018 by flautist James Dutton and pianist Oliver Davies.  I heard part of the content at a concert in The Guards' Chapel on 31st October (http://rootham.org/downloads/Guards_Chapel_Concert_2017-10-31.pdf (http://rootham.org/downloads/Guards_Chapel_Concert_2017-10-31.pdf)), and that was a great experience. I especially enjoyed the CBR Op.64 "Suite in Three Movements" (of course) - but also the "Sonata for Flute & Piano" by Stanley Bate.

More details about this CD on James Dutton's website: https://www.jamesduttonflute.com/recording/ (https://www.jamesduttonflute.com/recording/)

"...  I used your grandfather's image (complete with pipe) as one of my questions on our 'Guess the composer' quiz..."

Thank you for promoting CBR in a music quiz!  That photo with pipe was almost certainly taken by my father Jasper when he and CBR were on a walking holiday.  Probably the last vigorous outdoor excursion they had together before CBR suffered a stroke in 1936...
Thanks Daniel - I think that it's a great photo of your grandfather.
Best wishes
Jeffrey
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on January 18, 2018, 05:11:50 AM
News about the launch of a CD titled "Idyll: The English Flute Unheard": James Dutton (flute) and Oliver Davies (piano) have recorded music by composers connected with the Royal College of Music - and yes, that includes Cyril Bradley Rootham. The CD features works by CBR, Armstrong Gibbs (CBR's student at Cambridge), George Henschel, Norman Demuth, Richard Walthew, Stanley Bate, Robin Milford, Leonard Salzedo and John White.  I attended the concert in The Guards' Chapel last October when James and Oliver played several of these works, and I was particularly struck by the "Sonata for Flute" by Stanley Bate.

The launch event for the CD (free entry, free refreshments, informal recital and chat) will take place on 2nd March 2018 at Christ Church, Kensington: full details are on James Dutton's website https://www.jamesduttonflute.com/recording/ (https://www.jamesduttonflute.com/recording/).
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on January 18, 2018, 08:54:37 AM
News about the launch of a CD titled "Idyll: The English Flute Unheard": James Dutton (flute) and Oliver Davies (piano) have recorded music by composers connected with the Royal College of Music - and yes, that includes Cyril Bradley Rootham. The CD features works by CBR, Armstrong Gibbs (CBR's student at Cambridge), George Henschel, Norman Demuth, Richard Walthew, Stanley Bate, Robin Milford, Leonard Salzedo and John White.  I attended the concert in The Guards' Chapel last October when James and Oliver played several of these works, and I was particularly struck by the "Sonata for Flute" by Stanley Bate.

The launch event for the CD (free entry, free refreshments, informal recital and chat) will take place on 2nd March 2018 at Christ Church, Kensington: full details are on James Dutton's website https://www.jamesduttonflute.com/recording/ (https://www.jamesduttonflute.com/recording/).
That CD looks a must Daniel! I'm also a great admirer of Stanley Bate, especially symphonies 3 and 4 and the Piano Concerto and Viola Concerto released by Dutton. Apart from CBR I also really like the music of Robin Milford whose music reminds me of Finzi and also Armstrong Gibb, whose 'Westmorland' Symphony in memory of his son killed in World War Two is very moving.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on March 01, 2018, 01:58:07 AM
Bad news: the weather has tripped us up!  James Dutton has had to postpone the CD Launch until Friday 20 April at 19:30 (doors open at 19:00). Other details are unchanged: the venue is still Christ Church Kensington, Victoria Road, London W8 5RQ.  And some good news: the CD is indeed now on sale and available on the MPR label: http://www.mikepurtonrecording.com/cd-shop/idyll-the-english-flute-unheard (http://www.mikepurtonrecording.com/cd-shop/idyll-the-english-flute-unheard).
[Update: the CD launch went well, and shortly after that James Dutton gave three similar launch recitals: one in Norway and two in the USA.]
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: Roasted Swan on March 01, 2018, 06:51:07 AM
That CD looks a must Daniel! I'm also a great admirer of Stanley Bate, especially symphonies 3 and 4 and the Piano Concerto and Viola Concerto released by Dutton. Apart from CBR I also really like the music of Robin Milford whose music reminds me of Finzi and also Armstrong Gibb, whose 'Westmorland' Symphony in memory of his son killed in World War Two is very moving.

Slight tangent - with all the music that is being rehabilitated the orchestral works of Leonard Salzedo don't get a look-in.  The ballet The Witch Boy was presented as a suite on an old CFP LP years ago but there are numerous other pieces well worth hearing.  The Scherzo from his Concerto for 4 Percussionists used to be a party-piece for the RLPO percussion section years ago.
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: DanielR on June 25, 2018, 11:14:33 AM
"Slight tangent - with all the music that is being rehabilitated the orchestral works of Leonard Salzedo don't get a look-in."
But I did enjoy the Salzedo "Cantiga Morisca" on the recent CD "Idyll: The English Flute Unheard" (which also has Cyril Rootham's "Suite in Three Movements").  As a Cyril Rootham promoter I face similar problems: orchestral works are very expensive to record!  So I fall back on generated recordings - as an admittedly lame alternative to live music, but certainly better than nothing at all. For example, listen to Rootham's lively work "Four Impressions (Killarney)" Op.8 (1900).  It's an early work, it's not great music - but it's fun, and it certainly sounds convincingly Irish!  Here's the link:  http://rootham.org/playlist/opus_008/listen_opus008a_synth_mscore.html (http://rootham.org/playlist/opus_008/listen_opus008a_synth_mscore.html)

To drag the thread back to Cyril Rootham's music in live performance, I wanted to mention a concert on Sunday 1 July 2018 by the Bristol Chamber Choir. Their programme includes works by Aaron Copland - and by Cyril Rootham (whose father Daniel Wilberforce Rootham was musical director of the BCC's predecessor The Bristol Madrigal Society).  The afternoon concert at St Stephen's Church, Bristol BS1 1EQ starts at 3 pm, and there is a concert flyer to download on the choir's web page:  https://www.bristolchamberchoir.org.uk/page11.html (https://www.bristolchamberchoir.org.uk/page11.html)
Trains willing, I shall be there!
Title: Re: Cyril Rootham (1875-1938)
Post by: vandermolen on June 28, 2018, 02:43:16 AM
"Slight tangent - with all the music that is being rehabilitated the orchestral works of Leonard Salzedo don't get a look-in."
But I did enjoy the Salzedo "Cantiga Morisca" on the recent CD "Idyll: The English Flute Unheard" (which also has Cyril Rootham's "Suite in Three Movements").  As a Cyril Rootham promoter I face similar problems: orchestral works are very expensive to record!  So I fall back on generated recordings - as an admittedly lame alternative to live music, but certainly better than nothing at all. For example, listen to Rootham's lively work "Four Impressions (Killarney)" Op.8 (1900).  It's an early work, it's not great music - but it's fun, and it certainly sounds convincingly Irish!  Here's the link:  http://rootham.org/playlist/opus_008/listen_opus008a_synth_mscore.html (http://rootham.org/playlist/opus_008/listen_opus008a_synth_mscore.html)

To drag the thread back to Cyril Rootham's music in live performance, I wanted to mention a concert on Sunday 1 July 2018 by the Bristol Chamber Choir. Their programme includes works by Aaron Copland - and by Cyril Rootham (whose father Daniel Wilberforce Rootham was musical director of the BCC's predecessor The Bristol Madrigal Society).  The afternoon concert at St Stephen's Church, Bristol BS1 1EQ starts at 3 pm, and there is a concert flyer to download on the choir's web page:  https://www.bristolchamberchoir.org.uk/page11.html (https://www.bristolchamberchoir.org.uk/page11.html)
Trains willing, I shall be there!
The Four Impressions (Killarney) sound very enjoyable Daniel and entirely characterisic. Couldn't Dutton be encouraged to record it? It has potential wide appeal as immediately approchable and attractive music. Thanks for posting it.