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The Diner / Re: What are you drinking?
« Last post by Sergeant Rock on Today at 06:22:52 PM »
That said, I don't like peaty whiskies: I don't enjoy the feeling that I am drinking cigar smoke. So no Islays for me.

I abhor the smell of cigars but love, perhaps paradoxically, the smoke of wood, charcoal, and the peat component of Islay whiskies. But I understand where you're coming from: I haven't convinced any member of my family, or any friend, to share my taste in Laphroaig  ;)

Sarge
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"Deutsche Harmonia Mundi: 100 Great Recordings" at 63 EUR in Amazon Spain!

https://www.amazon.es/Deutsche-Harmonia-Mundi-Great-Recordings/dp/B0765S8NY4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1516500734&sr=8-1&keywords=deutsche+harmonia+mundi

I checked the earlier 50-CD collection and the "Baroque Masterpieces" from Sony and only about 20 discs were duplicated.
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Pulcinella Suite
Apollon musagète
Concerto in D for strings


Masaaki Suzuki, conductor
Tapiola Sinfonietta


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Landed today


Irrational feeling of pride on discovering it was recorded in the studios of WGBH, Boston.
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The Diner / Re: What are you drinking?
« Last post by Jeffrey Smith on Today at 05:47:22 PM »
I opened a bottle of 10yo Laphroaig tonight. Heretofore my favorite single malt, I was once again disappointed as I have been in their recent bottlings. The former unique experience, and to some off-putting iodine/medicinal/band-aid smell and taste, was buried in the mix, making it not much different from other Islay brands. Still love the island single malts but sad that the most individual of the lot has lost its individuality. Or maybe it's just me...getting on in years, losing my sense of taste and smell? I'm not sure which answer I prefer  :D

Sarge
I think a number of brands are finding demand outstrips supply, and in trying to meet the demand have declined a bit  or made tweaks to their output. Glenlivet has introduced a "Founder's Reserve" that's a blend of various ages to supplement their basic 12yo offering, supposedly because they don't have enough of the latter to meet the demand.

That said, I don't like peaty whiskies: I don't enjoy the feeling that I am drinking cigar smoke. So no Islays for me.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: Dachau Dithyramb
« Last post by Cato on Today at 05:13:09 PM »
From Is Classical Music Culturally Relevant?


Anyways all a composer needs to do to be culturally relevant is to title their work in line with some cause du jour. it’s easy, after ignoring the past 100 years of art, you take your mushy post-romantic wrong note vomit and tie it in with some great cause like global warming or the #metoo movement
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by listener on Today at 05:11:25 PM »
JANÁČEK: Lachian Dances       Sinfonietta     Taras Bulba
Slovak Radio S.O. (Bratislava)     Ondrej Lenárd, cond.
MILHAUD: Saudades do Brazil      La Muse ménagère*    L'Album de Mme. Bovary*
Alexandre Tharaud,   piano          *Madéleine Milhaud, narrator
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Anyways all a composer needs to do to be culturally relevant is to title their work in line with some cause du jour. it’s easy, after ignoring the past 100 years of art, you take your mushy post-romantic wrong note vomit and tie it in with some great cause like global warming or the #metoo movement

DACHAU DITHYRAMB!

http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php?topic=22661.0
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by André on Today at 04:58:07 PM »
A really great disc:



The music is not so much thrilling as fascinating and hugely engrossing. The symphony is a one-movement work of some 28 minutes’ duration. The work evolves from a simple beginning to a fully worked out ‘stream of consciousness’ flow recalling Strauss’ Metamorphosen or a Pettersson symphony.

The concerto is just as good, with the big central movement an absolutely hypnotic moment. The short finale is a fun romp where the piano runs up and down the keys, chased by the full orchestra. It is surprisingly ‘un’ modern compared to the first two movements.

I connect with Ruders more than with his compatriot Per Norgärd, whose music I find harder to get into. Ruders shares with Ib Norholm a transparency and an economy of gesture that prove very satisfying. Later on this week’s listening schedule wiil be his opera The Handmaid’s Tale. I last listened to it at least 5 years ago.
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Anyways all a composer needs to do to be culturally relevant is to title their work in line with some cause du jour.  it’s easy, after ignoring the past 100 years of art, you take your mushy post-romantic wrong note vomit and tie it in with some great cause like global warming or the #metoo movement
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