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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: Purchases Today
« Last post by Harry's corner on Today at 05:54:08 AM »
Harry: the Symphonie parisienne set is a must ! It's not just symphonies, but ballets and arias, all of them exquisitely played and sung. In the big works (Haydn symphonies and Beethoven 2) the PI really make a difference, even if they have been performed by many PI bands. I think the difference is that they are more relaxed in feeling, more joyful too. The conductor is more a primus inter pares than with other more tightly controlled ensembles. Big recommendation. ;)

Thank you that was really very helpful. :)
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: Purchases Today
« Last post by André on Today at 05:41:23 AM »
Harry: the Symphonie parisienne set is a must ! It's not just symphonies, but ballets and arias, all of them exquisitely played and sung. In the big works (Haydn symphonies and Beethoven 2) the PI really make a difference, even if they have been performed by many PI bands. I think the difference is that they are more relaxed in feeling, more joyful too. The conductor is more a primus inter pares than with other more tightly controlled ensembles. Big recommendation. ;)
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Great Recordings and Reviews / Re: Early English Vocal Music
« Last post by Biffo on Today at 05:39:32 AM »


John Sheppard is not as well known as the others mentioned in this thread, but he deserves mentioning. 

This is a wonderful album, I bought it recently as a lossless download from Hyperion.
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The Diner / Re: One Word Posts
« Last post by LKB on Today at 05:38:50 AM »
Liposuction
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But isn't the point of finding a pitch which resonates with our being a vibratory, physical thing? After all, resonance has to do with physical vibration. Can we detect this solely with with our ears, and would that be the goal?

It appears that you consider it possible to separate physicality and resonance of the body, from listening, as if listening were a detached, non-physical activity by comparison; or at least an activity which is not dependent upon or "limited" (as you put it) by physical factors of resonance.

It seems to me that unless listening is connected with resonance with the body, it is separated into a more cerebral or mental realm. This seems limiting in its own way.
It seems you are hung up on a point I never argued for or made.  Did you miss the BODY mention in what I said?

...our entire body is affected by resonance.  It is entirely -- most likely -- possible that the whole being, the ears and body, 'resonate' more fully to some pitch or harmony other than the one limited by the happenstance of the length of your vocal chords."

That tiny bit of our body, the vocal chords, is not any kind of receptor of sound, but what we produce sound with... the rather arbitrary caprice of how long your vocal chords are and what pitch their owner can most readily produce is the 'home pitch', not for your body or soul, but only for and by the physical characteristics of your vocal chords.  Yes, you vibrate when you sing, but not necessarily more to one pitch vs. another because one pitch is most readily produced. 

Our corporeal reaction to hearing music -- and what we are most receptive to re: pitch or key area -- vs. what pitch we as individuals can most readily produce by singing are, I think, two entirely different subjects.








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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: Purchases Today
« Last post by André on Today at 05:34:28 AM »
I liked the Reger piano set more than the organ sets, which augurs well for you.

I'm a bit ambivalent on this one, in the sense that I'm not quite sure what to expect. I already have the big variations works, but the bulk of Reger's piano output is made up of dozens, if not hundreds of small pieces. Reger composed klavierstücken like a hen lays eggs: by the dozen. They're mood pieces and they're over faster than you can read track listings, so an adequate concentration level is required. It certainly makes for a different listening experience.
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The Diner / Re: Six-letter-word posts
« Last post by Turbot nouveaux on Today at 05:08:19 AM »
grassy
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: A little history
« Last post by Mahlerian on Today at 05:08:13 AM »
From what I see the mixture programming and its abolition is the main point of the book some guy refers to. As I have not read the book, I am not sure but I still see no argument or historical evidence that lead from the abolishing of mixed (often light) programmes to the general suspicion against "modern music".

I have not read the book, either, so my knowledge of it is also entirely secondhand.  My understanding is that it points out that the low point of contemporary music programming was in the middle of the 19th century, though, rather than the 20th century.

I do not deny that such existed. But I do not see the connection with the form of programmes. In fact, as I said, I think that the more serious programmes and the canonization of Bach and Beethoven were a precondition for the modernists (at least for some strains of modernism, others were a more contrary reaction to canon and tradition, above all Satie).
Of course, the serious programmes were also a precondition for a later development that could pose "classical" (older) music against modernist/avantgarde music.

You are probably right there.  The conditions for an avant-garde existing within public concert life could not be present without a public concert life to present an avant-garde.

But from what I have seen is that when Fétis is trashing Berlioz' music or Hanslick Wagner's or Bruckner's they never argue that instead of these composers Bach or Mozart should be played in concert (and never forget, when such old music was played in the 19th century is was often in arrangements/editions adapted to contemporary tastes) or that contemporary composers should write like Bach or Mozart. Rather it is other (admittedly often somewhat less daring and more conservative) roughly contemporary composers that are favored against the mid-19th century modernists.

Isn't the same true of the vast majority of critics in the 20th century though?  Even someone like Pleasants who thinks that good "serious" music ended with Wagner some seven decades earlier (and considered all "serious" music of his time all equally tainted) favored the contemporary movement of jazz music.
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The Diner / Re: Three-Word Posts
« Last post by aligreto on Today at 05:05:02 AM »
daring deadly duels
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The Diner / Re: Two Word Posts
« Last post by aligreto on Today at 05:04:07 AM »
woollen shoes
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