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Daniil Trifonov, Denis Matsuev, Valery Gergiev, Yevgeny Sudbin, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman, Birgit Nilsson, Alexei Sultanov, Bella Davidovich, Jean-Yves Thibaudet, Barbara Nissman, Melos String Quartet, Kronos Quartet, Juilliard Qt, Lazar Berman, Emil Gilels, Nikolay Khozyainov, Anton Kuerti, Alexander Peshkanov, Gidon Kremer, Joshua Bell, Julian Bream, Christopher Parkening, David Russell, John Williams, and dozens of others. Some were after concerts, others were when I recorded them for broadcast on my local NPR station.

Wow! :o
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Daniil Trifonov, Denis Matsuev, Valery Gergiev, Yevgeny Sudbin, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman, Birgit Nilsson, Alexei Sultanov, Bella Davidovich, Jean-Yves Thibaudet, Barbara Nissman, Melos String Quartet, Kronos Quartet, Juilliard Qt, Lazar Berman, Emil Gilels, Nikolay Khozyainov, Anton Kuerti, Alexander Peshkanov, Gidon Kremer, Joshua Bell, Julian Bream, Christopher Parkening, David Russell, John Williams, and dozens of others. Some were after concerts, others were when I recorded them for broadcast on my local NPR station.
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Now going deeper into Villa-Loboian waters:

Choros No. 11 -

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The Diner / Re: What are you currently reading?
« Last post by SimonNZ on Today at 06:38:34 PM »
Also picking away at this on audiobook at about one disc per day,and finding it very good:

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Quintet:



One of my favorite chamber works by anyone. Exotic, intoxicating, and utterly passionate --- this is the kind of stuff I really get excited about.
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Cut and paste of two recent posts to the main Listening thread. Putting them here since the music definitely fits here:. all the works on these two CDs date from 2010-2015. As a general category, all of them are basically tonal, no electronics or other addition to the basic orchestal instrumentarium.

TD


Speculation prompted this purchase.
I like it...but I'm not sure I would recommend this to anyone.
Ritter thought the little he had heard of this composer suggested an epigone of Rodrigo.  The Spanish composer I thought I heard echoes of is De Falla, mixed in to the generic neoRomantic composers of the late 20th century. There is little to cue the listener in to the fact the two works date fron 2015 and 2011. I think a number of GMGers would be pleased with this CD, and a number of GMGers a bit bored.  I intend to get more of this composer, but the rest of you will just have to decide for yourselves.
Another first listen to stuff never heard before


Generally good. The soloists are the principal chairs of their respective sections of the Nashville Symphony.
Contents
Frank Ticheli Clarinet Concerto (2010)
Brad Warnaar Horn Concerto (2015)
Bezhad Ranjbaran Flute Concerto (2013).
I liked the Flute Concerto best on first hearing. The composer was born in Iran, but has lived and studied in the US since 1974, when he was 19.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by jessop on Today at 06:14:01 PM »
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Composing and Performing / Re: jessop's compositions
« Last post by jessop on Today at 05:58:19 PM »
Seems legit. I do similar things. The only thing I would say is that your final chord seems to have just too many notes. I think it would be difficult to hear the intervallic nuances if you just play it at once... the risk is that it may end sounding close to a cluster, you don't want that. Maybe playing it arpeggiated, even as some sort of melodic line, could be the most effective way of using it. Or maybe play one half of the chord first and then the other. For example, one can hear the intervallic relations in Webern because the writing is very austere. On the other hand, sometimes in Boulez I often hear his chords as clusters because they have just too many notes.

Another thing I do is to apply similar operations to all the voices in a polyphony... in this way, you get a weave that evolves at the pace of the original melodies in the texture but which becomes richer and richer in harmony. Some sort of controlled successions of chords of the type you have here.

Yep actually I never have all the notes playing at once. I agree that it can sound a bit too much like a cluster, but also, on the practical side of things, there is a maximum number of notes that a string quartet plus a guitar can play at any one time. Due to the physical impossibilities of having the entire chord sound at once it has indeed given me the opportunity to consider how I can split these chords up.
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Another first listen to stuff never heard before


Generally good. The soloists are the principal chairs of their respective sections of the Nashville Symphony.
Contents
Frank Ticheli Clarinet Concerto (2010)
Brad Warnaar Horn Concerto (2015)
Bezhad Ranjbaran Flute Concerto (2013).
I liked the Flute Concerto best on first hearing. The composer was born in Iran, but has lived and studied in the US since 1974, when he was 19.
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Composer Discussion / Re: Camille Saint-SaŽns
« Last post by Baron Scarpia on Today at 05:54:32 PM »
Listened today to Saint-Saens Piano Concerto No 3. In its form, it could be characterized as an absolutely standard 19th century piano concerto - not a work that paves a new path, but full of beautiful melodies, compelling harmonies and orchestration, and perfectly managed structure.

I listened to Ciccolini/Baudo on EMI. It is an analog recording from the mid-70's. Not the sort of recording you would use to demonstrate your stereo system, but an honest concert hall perspective which is satisfying. Ciccolini gives a non-flashy but masterful performance. Baudo is a conductor whose skill is often overlooked. He does a superb job here. He accomplishes the difficult task of keeping the trombones in control is their dramatic passages in this work.
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