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The Diner / Re: Lights! Greasepaint! Curtains! The Theater
« Last post by NikF on June 17, 2018, 11:36:29 PM »
Mega-bump!

This seems to be the only thread dedicated to the theatre on GMG . Thought I’d revive it to see if there’s theatre fans  (I see drogulus posted here 9 years ago) and to share my excitement with the upcoming performances in Madrid of what must be one of the most legendary stagings ever: Giorgio Strehler’s production of Goldoni’s Arlecchino servitore di due padroni. The Piccolo Teatro di Milano will be bringing it as guests to Madrid’s Teatro de la Comedia (where the Spanish National Classical Theatre Company is headquartered) , in a revival by Ferruccio Soleri.

Strehler first approached Goldoni’s play in 1947, and his staging (as well as the sets by Ezio Frigerio) evolved  over the years. I saw it in Caracas in 1983 (35 years ago, good heavens!  ::)) , and was bowled over.

I’m really looking forward to this... :)



ritter, that appears an interesting prospect indeed.
Consistently you choose from a fine menu. 8)  Enjoy!


At the moment only play I've tickets to attend is 'La Maladie de la mort' at the Edinburgh Festival -

'Katie Mitchell, one of the world’s most influential and iconoclastic theatre makers, presents her own uncompromising stage adaptation of the provocative novella by Marguerite Duras.

Duras’s 1982 psychological thriller focuses on an unnamed man who hires a woman to spend several weeks with him in a hotel by the sea, hoping to experience love. She may only visit him at night, and cannot speak to him unless invited to.

This radical reworking reveals the inner landscapes of both characters in a live cinema and theatre experience. It combines a theatre production performed live, with a film generated and edited in real time, and projected on a large screen above the set.'



https://www.eif.co.uk/whats-on/2018/maladie
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: Purchases Today
« Last post by Traverso on June 17, 2018, 11:28:27 PM »
Bartók & Kodály

Yesterday I wanted to listen to the concerto for orchestra and I did not have a recording.I'm still building up my collection after selling most of my LP's a few years ago.Another hole is filled. :)
The two piano concertos,the violin concertos , The Miraculous Mandarin,  Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta I have already but this box is still attractive enough to purchase.





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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Traverso on June 17, 2018, 10:44:22 PM »
Mozart

Beginning this day with these piano quartets,well played by Sonnerie.
Three piano quartets K478,K493 & K452

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Laura Bush speaks up on migrant children concentration camps.

Oh right, the wife of the president responsible for ongoing horrific birth defects in the Falluja region in Iraq due to spent uranium used by the US military, this is virtue signaling on steroids!

The onus of separation is on parents dragging their kids across the border, very irresponsible and even understandable to uneducated people. Many of the the children are not even related to the would be crossers but brought over as hostages.

I just read a tear jerker article on th BBC website that should have been more concerned all this time about rape gangs in the UK going on for decades. The courageous person who spoke up for these unjustly treated and neglected kids is now in jail again without due process.

Free Tommy Robinson!
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Mookalafalas on June 17, 2018, 10:14:49 PM »

4)  CD 1 of a 5 CD Tahra set titled "Hommage a Hermann Scherchen"  |Tr. 1-17.  J.S. Bach (1685-1750): The Musical Offering, S. 1079 (47'29)  |Tr. 18. Scherchen rehearses:  L.V. Beethoven (1770-1827): Symphony 8 in F Major, Op. 93 (1812) (22'19)--Hermann Scherchen, cond. (all), members of the Vienna Symphony Orch., 23 JUN 1950 (Tr. 1-17), l'Orchestre de la RTSI Lugano (Tr. 18, March 1965).

This set is a puzzle.  OTOH, it is, in some respects, a luxurious and generous offering.  The accompanying booklet (in French & English, but, suprisingly, not German) extends to 146 pages.  It is loaded with documentation on Scherchen, his career and his personal life, with lots of photos, all in black & white except for one color photograph of the cemetery where he is buried on the inside back cover, page 145.  Pics of his family, and posters announcing various concerts, and pages from concert programs throughout his career abound.  During his captivity in Russia as a civilian POW in WWI, he learned to read Russian and read Russian literature, particularly Dostoyevsky, in the original for the rest of his life.  He seems to have turned every misfortune into an opportunity.  The booklet spends a great deal of time exponding on his love for the music of Arnold Schoenberg, and in fact, the set includes a performance of Act 2 Scene 3 of Moses und Aron and in fact, the box includes a separate 16 page booklet, again in French and English, of the text to the Scene, entitled, "The Dance Around the Golden Calf."  And yet, there is no detail per track on the CDs.  Just the information on timings I have in the headnote.  In that respect, this is a bare bones production.

  I think Scherchen's daughter owns the Tahra label. Perhaps that solves some of the puzzle?

TD:
  Shostakovich Violin Sonata Op.134 and 147
  These are actually trios played by Sviatoslav Richter, Oleg Kagan, and Yuri Bachmet in 1982 and 1985
Dark, moody, wonderfully played.  From this
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Composer Discussion / Re: Chopin
« Last post by amw on June 17, 2018, 09:54:00 PM »
I learned Op.10 no.12 ages ago but have honestly forgotten most of it. It is certainly written more explicitly as a concert piece, compared to op.10 no.11, which I also learned and which is not nearly as musically interesting (though more valuable as an etude, at least for me and my hand size).

Op.10 no.12 is one of the only études that really focuses on the left hand, basically a much easier version of the hand-shifting in Op.10 no.1; the popularity of the Godowsky studies on the Chopin études is that they develop the left hand much more significantly than Chopin tried to. When I looked into using the Chopin études as the basis for teaching myself piano technique, I figured I'd have to supplement with the Godowsky versions of Op.10 no.2 and Op.25 no.6 at minimum.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by RebLem on June 17, 2018, 09:50:21 PM »
On Sunday, 17 JUNE 2018, I listened to 4 CDs.

1)  CD 24 of the 24 CD set entitled "Gary Graffman: The Complete RCA & Columbia Album Collection."  It consists of 18 tracks of music from the Woody Allen film MANHATTAN, all by George Gershwin (1898-1937).  The album notes credit Zubin Mehta as the conductor with the NYPO, but I have information from Wikipedia that says Tracks 3, 7, & 18 were recorded by the Buffalo Philharmonic.  Graffman is the pianst only in Track 1.  Dick Hyman is the pianist in Tracks 6 & 11.  All the others are orchestra only.  No vocalists.  A number of musicians from outside the orchestra are on Track 11, but I am not going to list them all.  Music in some places orchestrated and adapted by Tom Pierson.  |Tr. 1.  Rhapsody in Blue (16'35)  |Tr. 2. Land of the Gay Caballero (0'35).  |Tr. 3.  Someone to Watch Over Me (3'26)  |Tr. 4.  I've Got a Crush on You (0'44)  |Tr. 5. Do, Do, Do (1'56)  |Tr. 6.  Mine (3'00)  |Tr. 7. He Loves and She Loves (1'19)  |Tr. 8.  Bronco Busters (1'18)  |Tr. 9.  Oh, Lady Be Good! (0'58)  |Tr. 10.  'S Wonderful (1'04)  |Tr. 11.  Love is Here to Stat (2'46)  |Tr. 12.  Sweet and Low-Down  (0'47)  |Tr. 13.  Blue Blue Blue (0'40)  |Tr. 14.  Embraceable You (1'49)  |Tr. 15.  He Loves and She Loves (1'19)  |Tr. 16.  Love is Sweeping the Country/Land of the Gay Caballero (0'43)  |Tr. 17.  Strike Up the Band (0'37)  |Tr. 18.  But Not for Me (1'12).  Rec. Columbia 30th St. Studio, NYC 7 MAR 1979, at least per liner notes.  I am skeptical.

Obviously great music, somewhat marred by the fact that a lot of it was truncated for the film.  The Rhapsody is the highlight here, and its a wonderfully idiomatic performance.

2)  L. V. Beethoven (1770-1827):  |Tr. 1-4.  Symphony 9 in D Minor, Op. 125 (63'17)  |Tr. 5.  Leonore Overture III in C Major, Op. 72a (13'38)--Fritz Busch, cond., Danish RSO (Tr. 1-5) & Chorus, Kerstin Lindberg-Torlind, soprano, Else Jena, mezzo-soprano, Eric Sjoberg, tenor, Holger Byrding, bass (Tr. 1-4).  Rec. 7 SEP 1950 (Tr. 1-4), 24 OCT 1949 (Tr. 5).  GUILD Records.

This Ninth is a very well executed MOR performance.  The only thing a little unusual is that like a very few other conductors, Fritz Busch does not speed up as much in the final two minutes as most other conductors do.  He speeds up just a tad, but not much.  The vocal quartet is a very well matched one; not a weak performer among them and they gel  unusually well with each other.

Leonore III is also an excellent performance.  This CD is another example of a point I have made before.  This orchestra, variously called the Danish Radio Symphony, The Danish National RSO, or the Danish State RSO, is a far better orchestra than its reputation and has been for a long time.

3)  Frank Bridge (1879-1941):  |Tr. 1.  Rhapsody, H. 174 (1927) "Enter Spring"  (18'36)   |Tr. 2,  Isabella, Symphonic Poem after Keats, H. 78 (1907) (18'00)  |Tr. 3-4.  Two Poems for Orchestra after Richard Jeffries, H., 118 (1915) (12'58)  |Tr. 5.  Mid of the Night, symphonic poem for orchestra, H. 30 (1903) (26'05)--Richard Hickox, cond., BBC National Orch. of Wales.  Rec. Brangwyn Hall, Swansea, 26-27 NOV 2000.  CD 1 of a 6 CD set of Bridge's complete orchestral music performed by these forces. CHANDOS.

All these works, from his very first orchestral work, the Mid of the Night, through the latest of them on this CD, "Enter Spring" from 1927, are in a late romantic idiom.  This is somewhat startling for someone like me, who knows Frank Bridge primarily from a few chamber pieces and the fact that he was the most important teacher and mentor in the life of Benjamin Britten, whom I would classify, to the extent that he is classifiable, as a neo-classicist.  But, nevertheless, there you have it.

4)  CD 1 of a 5 CD Tahra set titled "Hommage a Hermann Scherchen"  |Tr. 1-17.  J.S. Bach (1685-1750): The Musical Offering, S. 1079 (47'29)  |Tr. 18. Scherchen rehearses:  L.V. Beethoven (1770-1827): Symphony 8 in F Major, Op. 93 (1812) (22'19)--Hermann Scherchen, cond. (all), members of the Vienna Symphony Orch., 23 JUN 1950 (Tr. 1-17), l'Orchestre de la RTSI Lugano (Tr. 18, March 1965).

This set is a puzzle.  OTOH, it is, in some respects, a luxurious and generous offering.  The accompanying booklet (in French & English, but, suprisingly, not German) extends to 146 pages.  It is loaded with documentation on Scherchen, his career and his personal life, with lots of photos, all in black & white except for one color photograph of the cemetery where he is buried on the inside back cover, page 145.  Pics of his family, and posters announcing various concerts, and pages from concert programs throughout his career abound.  During his captivity in Russia as a civilian POW in WWI, he learned to read Russian and read Russian literature, particularly Dostoyevsky, in the original for the rest of his life.  He seems to have turned every misfortune into an opportunity.  The booklet spends a great deal of time exponding on his love for the music of Arnold Schoenberg, and in fact, the set includes a performance of Act 2 Scene 3 of Moses und Aron and in fact, the box includes a separate 16 page booklet, again in French and English, of the text to the Scene, entitled, "The Dance Around the Golden Calf."  And yet, there is no detail per track on the CDs.  Just the information on timings I have in the headnote.  In that respect, this is a bare bones production.

Per Wikipedia, "The Musical Offering (German title: Musikalisches Opfer or Das Musikalische Opfer), BWV 1079, is a collection of keyboard canons and fugues and other pieces of music by Johann Sebastian Bach, all based on a single musical theme given to him by Frederick the Great (Frederick II of Prussia), to whom they are dedicated. The Ricercar a 6, a six-voice fugue which is regarded as the highpoint of the entire work, was put forward by the musicologist Charles Rosen as the most significant piano composition in history (partly because it is one of the first).[1] This ricercar is also occasionally called the Prussian Fugue, a name used by Bach himself."
This performance is very brightly recorded, and the sound is rather harsh.  Because of that, I do not recommend it.
The Beethoven 8th is a rehearsal, none of which, of course, is in English.  We do get to hear quite a lot of Scherchen's voice, which is rich with staccato bursts, and lots of rapid speech and clipped, crisp, sharp directions.  He sounds rather intimidating, but the orchestra seems to respond well to his direction.  Their respect for him is palpable.
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The Diner / Re: Worst looking CD/LP artwork
« Last post by Madiel on June 17, 2018, 09:32:46 PM »
Mostly it's just dated.

Also, large.
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Composer Discussion / Re: Chopin
« Last post by Madiel on June 17, 2018, 09:31:51 PM »
The musical interest of them varies in my opinion. Some of them wear their technical side too obviously to be great pieces of music.

Op.10 no.12 is, believe it or not, one of the more manageable ones if you know what you're doing and one that I managed to learn. More than anything it's about conservation of energy, and shaping the piece musically is the way to do it. If you go hell for leather your left arm will give out before you reach the end.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: Film (movie) Music
« Last post by vandermolen on June 17, 2018, 09:24:21 PM »
Cheers. I will have to investigate Charles Gerhardt!

If you type his name and 'classic film scores' into Amazon a lot come up. They were reissued on CD a while back but some are now over-priced. The one that I'd especially recommend is entitled 'Sunset Boulevard - the music of Franz Waxman' especially for the extraordinary 'making of the Female Monster' from Bride of Frankenstein. There's also a section from 'A Place in the Sun' which is identical to a part of Shostakovich's 11th Symphony but was composed before the Shostakovich! No way  that Dmitri S could have seen the movie and even more ironically Waxman conducted the West Coast premiere of Shostakovich's 11th Symphony.

I think that the clip below is very interesting and also plays a clip of the Fugue from Porgy and Bess, earlier than both, which has a similar theme.

https://youtu.be/Tzti-u2yd3o
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