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11
I have not heard the set, but I read somewhere, that the SQ is sub par.

I can confirm that.
12
Cock. There’s an expression  « a cock and bull story » and The Cock and Bull is a pretty common name for a pub. Because of this « Cok’s Bull » sounds funny, I can hardly bring myself to write it! It doesn’t help that cock is a slang word for penis and bull sound like ball = testicle, and in Northern England « cock » is a friendly term of endearment, as in « what’s up, cock? »

I just abandoned Cok’s Bull after 10 minutes and am now enjoying Rampe at Tangermunde.

That was fast. I use to do a 15 minutes test.

But very few can compete with Rampe and the Tangermünde organ.
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If you could find a reference for that I’d appreciate it. In Delecroix’s book on Achilles he suggests that they’re lovers, and I argued vehemently with a friend who was reading it at the same time as me  that this is nonsense, there’s nothing to suggest it in Homer etc.

It was fabulous going back to read the Iliad, by the way, I reread Priam meeting Achlles in his tent at the end- extraordinary humane poetry - and Achilles and Scamander, which I find as exciting now as when I first encountered it when I was at school. The Greek is too hard for me now, it always was hard for me, but now it’s painfully so, I had to use a translation.

I think the intense friendship and Achilles's intense grief in the wake of Patroklus's death suggest to modern ears a passionate love. What they suggested to the people of Homer's era may have been totally different. Maybe warriors did bond that closely without mixing in an erotic element to the relationship. David and Yonatan in the Book of Samuel would be a good parallel, close in time and not too distant in physical space. I don't know of anyone claiming them as homosexual lovers.
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Agreed, certainly not in Homer, although others such as Aeschylus and Plato did depict them as lovers.

If you could find a reference for that I’d appreciate it. In Delecroix’s book on Achilles he suggests that they’re lovers, and I argued vehemently with a friend who was reading it at the same time as me  that this is nonsense, there’s nothing to suggest it in Homer etc.

It was fabulous going back to read the Iliad, by the way, I reread Priam meeting Achlles in his tent at the end- extraordinary humane poetry - and Achilles and Scamander, which I find as exciting now as when I first encountered it when I was at school. The Greek is too hard for me now, it always was hard for me, but now it’s painfully so, I had to use a translation.

It is the ideal thing to argue, since the question can never be answered. Even in the time of Plato the identity of Homer and the origin of the epics was unknown. It's like watching the Charlston Heston movie to find out if Moses had a beard.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by ritter on Today at 01:23:18 PM »
What is it like please?
[/quoteThe work is supposed to be an overture (IIRC, to an opera that was never composed), but it last almost thirty minutes, so it’s almost a symphonic poem of sorts. The start is quite impressive, with its prolonged crescendo (think Bartók’s The Wooden Prince), but quite brooding and somber. It’s by no means tha “folkloric” Skalkottas of the Greek Dances, as the work is twelve-tone, but quite approachable and serene.
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Spurred by Cato’s contribution to the “Iliad and Odyssey” thread started by springrite, revisiting Nikos Skalkottas’s wonderful The Return of Ulysses.



What is it like please?
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by JBS on Today at 01:13:01 PM »
Here's an intriguing new program of guitar rep.



Barrios Mangoré - La catedral
Tansman - Inventions (Hommage à Bach); Passacaille
Bach/Garcia - you know which chaconne
Bogdanović - Suite brève

Plus a couple more little Bach transcriptions, including an Ave Maria with soprano Elsa Dreisig.

I have listened to that CD once, but need to listen to it more. The familiar stuff relaxed me too much, so I let the Tansman and Bogdanovic slip by with less attention than they deserve.

Ms. Thirty also appears here in one other track, by Villa-Lobos. You can guess which Bachianas Brasilieras it is. She has a recital CD coming out from Warner, so I supect a bit of cross promotion was involved.
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, although others such as Aeschylus and Plato did depict them as lovers.

If you could find a reference for that I’d appreciate it. In Delecroix’s book on Achilles he suggests that they’re lovers, and I argued vehemently with a friend who was reading it at the same time as me  that this is nonsense, there’s nothing to suggest it in Homer etc.

It was fabulous going back to read the Iliad, by the way, I reread Priam meeting Achlles in his tent at the end- extraordinary humane poetry - and Achilles and Scamander, which I find as exciting now as when I first encountered it when I was at school. The Greek is too hard for me now, it always was hard for me, but now it’s painfully so, I had to use a translation.
20
General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by ritter on Today at 01:06:40 PM »
Now on to Arthur Honegger’s ballet Sémiramis (based on Paul Valéry, and commissioned by Ida Rubinstein):

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