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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: Prematurely Avant-Garde
« Last post by vandermolen on Today at 03:39:50 AM »
The 'Sinfonie Singuliere' by Berwald (1845) sounds to me like it belongs to a much later period.
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I am not sure why the performance didn't click on first hearing, somehow my attention wandered. It must have been a great experience to hear it live. Listening to the radio broadcast the soprano soloist sounded rather disembodied, not sure that it was a good thing but she gave a passionate performance.
Maybe it worked better actually seeing her, spot-lit at the back. I found it more moving than had she been at the front. Was a great concert anyway.
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The Diner / Simple childhood pleasures?
« Last post by NikF on Today at 03:35:58 AM »
My grandmother would sometimes give me a boiled egg for breakfast. Quite often it would contain a double yolk. I'd dip bread that was cut into slices ('soldiers' ;D) into it. Wonderful.

So what did you have? Doesn't have to be food. Just a childhood pleasure.
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The Diner / Re: Last Movie You Watched
« Last post by milk on Today at 03:31:20 AM »
I think this essentially wrongheaded.  The central action of the movie is the bandit’s being on trial, and the rape is one of the charges to which he is made to answer.  Not only is the bandit neither glorified nor exonerated for the deed, the rape is specifically designated as crime.  The wife’s shame has practically an entire sub-narrative to itself.  And one of the concluding reflections of the movie is utter despair of human goodness (not, “well, it’s all rather a downer, but at least the bandit got himself a piece of nice tail”).

To tweeze, out of all that, “a trivialization of rape” does (with all due respect) seem to feed the anti-Liberal “PC-gone-amok” narrative.

One of the first Russian jokes I was told when I was in St Petersburg was about a ladies’ sauna which was recently built next to a block of flats.  One of the residents called his Building Committee to complain.

“What’s wrong?” they asked, on arriving at the Citizen’s flat.

“It’s indecent,” he protested.  “You can see naked women over the top of the fence.”

One member of the Committee looked out the window, and said, “I only see the fence, Comrade.”

“Yes, but if you step up onto this chair . . . .”
When was the last time you saw it? I hadn’t seen it for twenty years. I found myself unable to ignore the questions that continually pop up about the meaning and depiction of the rape In Rashomon. It’s not easy to tease out what is a representation of the view of medieval Japan and what is the “gaze” of the film. From the standpoint of the medieval story and mores, the bandit’s criminality is for having stolen something that is valuable to men and what is the difference between honor and shame for the woman. That’s true. One can very well lay this at the doorstep of the historical context. The rape itself is never given any realism, or consideration in itself, for what it is. The Bandit is almost a comic character in Rashomon, certainly the most memorable and really charming part of the film (Mifune is the most talented performer here). I don’t think any character’s story presented is dismissed out of hand because of the reality of rape. Each is dismissed for different reasons, including the one where she enjoys the rape. Clearly it’s self-serving for the bandit but not depicted as implausible because of the horror (which really isn’t hinted at, only dishonor after the fact is regrettable). There is no reality really. The inhumanity is doled out equally among the characters, including the woman, because of their actions - nothing specially bad about the rape that exonerates the woman. Watch it again and you’ll see the fingerprints of a man from a very sexist society in time and place all over it. Does the very fact that that dehumanization of women was THE view of the time and place (1951) let the film off the hook? Does a critique of the film from the most realistic and humanistic point of view equate to political correctness? I disagree on several fronts here: Rape and its depiction doesn’t get immunity from a filmic statute of limitations; it’s not the special property of one or another political pov, it’s always horrible and immoral; my comments merely critique the representation of woman in a film, the fact that this film is old is neither here nor there. There is nothing politically correct about saying that rape presented in a silly and shallow way is lacking, though this may indeed be a very modern view. Rashomon is the gaze of a man of his time. Fine. This man is not interested in the reality of rape and neither was his audience. Fine. Rashomon doesn’t really show how a woman would really look and feel and react and exist having been raped? Yes for me. I don’t see anything politically correct about my view. This is not the same as the N-word in Huckleberry Fin which clearly needs lots of context, historical, linguistic, political, to understand and appreciate. Rape itself doesn’t change. Let me add: go back and watch this film now. What you’ll see is several performances of a rape. None of them care about reality. None of them even hint at it. People have always said: oh well that’s not the point of the film. EXACTLY my point!
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Yes, it’s that magic time once again:  See how your nest egg shrinks!

Well, the fat cats are fatter, but my retirement funds are down $2,000 from last week.

By the way, it was a rookie mistake (as one observer put it) for El Tupé to try to take credit for a strong stock market (when it was strong . . . well, it is not exactly weak right now).  Yet, it is fair to attribute the volatility and non-growth of the present market substantially to both The Clownish President’s erratic foreign policy, and his boneheaded elective trade war.  The tariff chaos is not going to end anytime soon.
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The Diner / Re: Who was your crush when you were growing up?
« Last post by NikF on Today at 03:07:50 AM »
Here's another set of crushes that were probably influential.  ;D The thing is, it was a bit before my time, but because one of the dogs runs off at that beginning it was shown regularly on those outtakes shows at xmas. That was almost the only time we had a television so I got to see it often.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/HFVueJSJuEM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/HFVueJSJuEM</a>

FWIW
1) Red (legs/'cat on a hot tin roof')
2) Green (would probably eat you alive)
3) White (safe option)
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Biffo on Today at 02:53:08 AM »
I was there for Prom 41 and you are right that it was a very moving performance (being televised on 2nd December in the UK I think). I liked the soprano soloist being situated right at the back, behind the choir and spotlit just for her contributions. I was pleased that my wife and daughter enjoyed it to. My daughter said that she found the conclusion of Dona Nobis Pacem to be a bit too 'It's A Wonderful Life' but that's just an example of her cynicism and I very much disagreed with her.

I am not sure why the performance didn't click on first hearing, somehow my attention wandered. It must have been a great experience to hear it live. Listening to the radio broadcast the soprano soloist sounded rather disembodied, not sure that it was a good thing but she gave a passionate performance.
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General Classical Music Discussion / Re: What are you listening to now?
« Last post by Traverso on Today at 02:41:50 AM »
D'Anglebert
 
A very good recording,a very fine Cembalo and well played.

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And today, in It’s Only MIDI:

(Brass tones, though . . . MIDI "voices" are ghastly.)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/reGBWH_my20" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/reGBWH_my20</a>
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